(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Film Daily (Jul-Sep 1943)"

Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 




AUDIO-VISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The LIBRARY ..if CONGRESS 




Packard Campus 

for Audio Visual Conservation 

www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 



Senate Vote of $50,000 Kills O Wis Film Bureau 



Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 




The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



-^FDAIL 



y\. 84, NO. 1 



NEW YORK, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 1943 




TO EXTEND LOEWS TOP EXECS! CONTRACTS 

Factional Mouthpiece Role Holds Danger— Myers 



Industry Must Not be Used 
As Propaganda Machine, 
Allied Executive Warns 



By AL STEEN 
Associate Editor, THE FILM DAILY 

West End, N. J.— The motion 
picture industry must not be- 
some a mouthpiece for any one 
segment of the 
Government o r 
it will find itself 
in a dangerous 
spot, Abram F. 
Myers, general 
counsel of Na- 
tion a 1 Allied, 
warned at the 
Allied of New 
Jersey annual 
conference here 
yesterday. The 
picture business 
is not and 
should not be 
a propaganda machine except in the 

(Continued on Page 11) 




William Goetz to Open Offices of His Own 

Company, International Pictures, on Tuesday 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — William Goetz who resigned as vice-president in charge of pro- 
duction for 20th-Fox to form his own producing organization, has announced 
the association of Leo Spitz as chairman of the board of the new company 
which will be known as International Pictures, Inc. Goetz completes his duties 
at the 20rh-Fox studio, Saturday. 

Offices of International Pictures will be opened next Tuesday in the Corinne 
Griffith building. No plans for distribution or selection of a studio for produc- 
tion have been made as yet. 

Nunnally Johnson has been signed to produce. 



ABRAM F. MYERS 



No Freon Relief in 
Sight for Theaters 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — No relief is in sight 
from the recent WPB order forbid- 
ding the sale of freon for theater 
air conditioning plants, A. G. Smith, 

(Continued on Page 6) 



97% Holdovers for 
"Action in Atlantic" 

Out of its first 410 engagements, 
Warners' "Action in the North At- 
lantic" has been held over in 398 
situations, a score of 97 per cent, 
according to the company's playdate 
department. All of the remaining 
12 dates were in stands with a 
set policy that precludes holdovers. 

From a gross standpoint, more than 
100 "Action" bookings already have 
either approximated or exceeded 
"Casablanca" according to the home 
office. 



Senate Votes End 
Of OWI Film Bureau 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — The war job done by 
the motion picture industry is once 
again back in the lap of the indus- 
try — just about as completely as it 
was a year ago prior to the forma- 
tion of the OWI. Slight Government 
aid may be looked for, but the em- 
phasis is upon the word "slight." 

The end of the OWI motion picture 
bureau as an effective instrument to 

(Continued on Page 10) 

Open War Stamp Drive 
To Build "Shangri-La" 



Nation's exhibs., 13,000 strong, 
allied with the country's retail 
stores and newsboys, today launch 
a month's campaign to sell an extra 
dollar's worth of War Stamps to 
every American. 

The resulting $130,000,000— which 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Allied May Re-write 
Its Decree Changes 



West End, N. J.— Some of the 
proposals made by Allied for changes 
in the consent decree may be re- 
written so as to be more specific, 
it was indicated here yesterday by 
some Allied leaders. It was asserted 
by some that the recommendations 
were too general and it was hinted 
that the Department of justice 
would like more details as to re- 

(Continued on Page 11) 



Reserves Decision On 
Racketeer Dismissal Plea 



Mayer, Rubin, Bernstein, 
Weingarten Deals Before 
Stockholders on July 29 



By LOU PELEGRINE 
FILM DAILY Staff Writer 

The board of directors of 
Loew's, Inc., has ordered a spe- 
cial meeting of the company's 
stockholders to ask approval for the 
renewal of the contracts of four top 
executives, Louis B. Mayer, J. Rob- 
ert Rubin, David Bernstein and Law- 
rence Weingarten, it was learned 
yesterday. The meeting will be held 
the morning of July 29 at the com- 
pany's home office. 

In the notice to stockholders Nich- 
olas M. Schenck, president of M-G- 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Decision was reserved yesterday 
by Federal Judge Murray Hulbert 
on motions to dismiss the indictment 
against the six alleged Chicago 
gangsters charged with conspiracy 
to extort more than $1,000,000 from 
the film industry. One of the mo- 
(Continued on Page 6) 



More % Deals Warners' Aim 

Small Isolated Accounts to be Exceptions 



1,000 Attend 20th-Fox 
Family Club Outing 



Bear Mountain Park, N. Y.— With 
some 1,000 executives and club mem- 
bers' in attendance, the 20th Cen- 
tury-Fox Home Office Family Club 
(Continued on Page 12) 



A concerted effort to extend the 
number of percentage deals, as more 
beneficial to the exhibitor as well as 
the distributor, is expected to be 
urged on Warners' sales force at the 
regional sales meeting which will be 
called to order by Ben Kalmenson, 
general sales manager, at 10 a.m. 

(Continued on Page 12) 



Exhib. Aggressiveness 
Urged on Pic Rentals 



West End, N. J. — More aggres- 
sive complaints on the film rentals 
situations on the part of exhibitors 
were advocated by Sidney Samuel- 
son, national Allied leader, at the 
second day's sessions of New Jersey 
Allied's 24th annual conference at 

(Continued on Page 10) 



N. J. Allied Re-elects 
Loewenstein Prexy 

West End, N. J. — Harry Loewen- 
stein was re-elected president of New 
Jersey Allied at its annual confer- 
ence here yesterday. Lou Gold was 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Armour Quits Post 
With Disney Abroad 

Reginald Armour announced yes- 
terday that he had resigned as 
European managing director for 
Walt Disney Productions. Armour, 
who recently arrived in New York 
from London, stated that he will 
vacation for a few months after 
which he will indicate his future 
plans. 



^ m $130,000,000 IN WAR STAMP SALES WILL BUILD AIRPLANE CARRIER — DO YOVR BIT! J^ ^ 



== 



4 jK 






^*a? 



_pv 



Thursday, July 1, 194 




Vol. 84, No. 1 Thurs., July 1, 1943 lOCents 



JOHN W. ALICOATE : 



DONALD M. MERSEREAU 



CHESTER B. BAHN 



Publisher 



General Manager 



Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address- 
Filmday, New York. 



• Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Willc, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correct 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco-Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



FINANCIAL 



(Wednesday, June 30) 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat 16 16 16 

Col.Piets. vtc. (2'/ 2 %) 18Vi 18Vz 18'/i + V4 

Columbia Picts. pfd 

Con. Fm. Ind 17% "Vi l 7 Vi 

Con. 'Fm. Ind. pfd 

East. Kodak 166 165 1653/4 + % 

do pfd 

Cen. Prec. Eq 23 >/ 2 225/ 8 225/ 8 — Va 

Loew's, Inc 60 Vi 60 Vi 60y 2 — V4 

Paramount 277/ 8 273/ 4 27y 8 — Vs 

RKO 9'/ 8 9 9 

RKO $6 pfd 95 94'/ 2 9414 _ i/ 2 

20th Century-Fox ... 2^% 21 213/ 8 + l/ 4 
20th Century-Fox pfd. 32% 32l/ 4 32% + Va 

Univ. Pict. pfd 

Warner Bros 147/ 8 14% 1434 — l/ 8 

do pfd 88I/4 88'/ 4 88\4 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Para. iB'way 3s55... 773/ 8 773/ 8 773/ 8 

Para. Picts. deb. 4s56 

Warner Bros.' dbs. 6s48 

101 V4 101 101 — 1/4 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Monogram Picts 3% 3Vz 3% — Va 

Radio-Keith cvs 1% 134 1% -f l/ 8 

Sonotone Corp 31/2 3% 3Vi 

Technicolor 1234 1234 12% — Va 

Trans-Lux 33/ 4 31/4 3% -f % 

Universal Corp. vtc 

Universal Picts 



7,572 Eastman Employes 
In Service; 12 Gold Stars 



Rochester — Eastman Kodak em- 
ployes now in the armed service 
total 7,572. Of this total, 12 have 
given their lives. 



Gold Bars for Lionel Toll 

Camp Lee, Va. — Lionel Toll, editor 
of the Independent, New York trade 
paper, will be commissioned a sec- 
ond lieutenant in the QMC on gradu- 
ation tomorrow from OCS here. 



comma mid goiiig 



WILIAM F. RODGERS, M-G-M vice-president 
in charge of sales, returns to New York today 
from a visit to the Culver City studios. 

M-G-M branch managers RALPH MAW of 
Buffalo and HERMAN RIPPS of Albany will 
be in New York next Tuesday to confer with 
E. M. SAUNDERS and other home office of- 
ficials. 

B. G. DE SYLVA, executive producer of 
"For Whom the Bell Tolls," arrived in New 
York yesterday by train from Toronto, to re- 
main for the premiere of "For Whom the Bell 
Tolls." 

MITCHELL RAWSON, Warners' Eastern publi- 
city manager, returns late today from Charlotte, 
N. C, where he went to complete arrangements 
for the preview of "Mission to Moscow" there. 

BETTY HUTTON leaves the Coast for New 
York today. 

DAVE PALFREYMAN is en route from the 
Coast to New York. 

JULIUS J. EPSTEIN and PHILLIP C. EP- 
STEIN have arrived from Burba nk. 



ALLEN G. SMITH of the WPB left Washing- 
ton yesterday for a two weeks' Southwestern 
tour. 

IRVING BERLIN spent yesterday in Washing- 
ton conferring with Maj. Irving J. Phillipson, 
head of Army Emergency Relief. 

FRED MARSHALL is in New Haven from 
New York on Universal exploitation of "Next of 
Kin." 

MRS. HOOT GIBSON, is vacationing in 
Wilkes-Barre, her home city. 

RICHARD F. WALSH, IATSE president, is on 
a Western trip. 

ED PESKAY, eastern representative of Edward 
Small Productions, is on the Coast for con- 
ferences. 

JUDY GARLAND is en route to Philadelphia 
from the Coast. 

MOE A. LEVY, 20th-Fox district manager 
in charge of the Minneapolis, Des Moines and 
Omaha territories, who has been in town for 
sales conferences, returns to his headquarters 
in Minneapolis tomorrow. 



Cleveland Friends Fete 
Fellman on Departure 



Cleveland — Nat Fellman was guest 
of honor at a farewell dinner held 
by members of the film colony to 
speed him on his way to New York 
where he takes over his duties as 
booker for the Warner theater de- 
partment under Clayton Bond. Fell- 
man was head of the local theater 
booking department until his recent 
promotion. Dinner was at Korn- 
man's restaurant, after which the 
group, consisting of more than 50 
film men representing every ex- 
change and composed of the leading 
exhibitors, adjourned to the Variety 
Club. 



RKO to Screen Next Five 
In Exchanges July 12-15 



RKO's next block of five pictures 
will be screened July 12-15 in the 
company's exchanges. The group 
consists of "The Sky's the Limit," 
"Behind the Rising Sun," "Pitticoat 
Larceny," "The Falcon in Danger" 
and "Mexican Spitfire's Blessed 
Event." 



Chi. Equipment Firms 
Working on July Fourth 

Chicago — Motiograph, DeVry, Bell- 
Howell and Wenzel Projector will 
work July Fourth holiday on Army 
and Navy equipment. Motiograph 
is granting employes two weeks' va- 
cation with pay. Many of its em- 
ployes forsaking the vacations to 
work on Government orders, receiv- 
ing extra compensation. 

George F. Dembow Elected 
To National Screen Board 



George F. Dembow, vice-president 
in charge of sales, has been elected 
to the board of National Screen Ser- 
vice Corp. to fill a vacancy, it was 
announced yesterday by President 
Herman Robbins. 



Selznick Strikes New Note 
In Picture Making 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — A new note in film 
making is being applied by David 
0. Selznick in preparation of his 
next picture, "Since You Went 
Away." It is, in effect, a blueprint 
of the picture, a pre-production de- 
sign as complete as the detailed 
drawings of a building by an archi- 
tect before construction begins. 

Selznick has had collaborating 
with him William L. Pereira. 

Selznick and Pereira plan scenes 
one by one during the development 
of the story proper and write the 
action and dialogue to fit Pereira's 
illustrations. 

Mrs. Margaret Buell Wilder, au- 
thor of book of the same title as the 
picture, is collaborating with Selz- 
nick on the screen story. She and 
Selznick outline to Pereira the steps 
in the story. Pereira then sketches 
roughly the scenes, and composes a 
scene exactly as it will be photo- 
graphed. Then Selznick and Mrs. 
Wilder write sequences to fit Pere- 
ira's sketches, and he in turn com- 
bines his sketches with the dialogue 
to give the director a complete vis- 
ual blueprint to shoot from. 



Three OWI Posters Going 
To Exhibs. for August 

Exhibs. will receive three more 
OWI posters for August lobby dis- 
play. The one-sheets which are 
available from National Screen Ser- 
vice exchanges are "I'm Counting On 
You," a warning against careless 
talk; "This is the Enemy" and 
"United Nations Fight For Free- 
dom." 

WAC has also recommended that 
the OWI include a fourth poster 
which exhibitors might choose to dis- 
play during the showing of a spy or 
saboteur movie. It is "A Warning 
From the FBI" which requests that 
any evidence of sabotage or the pres- 
ence of enemy agents be reported 
immediately to the FBI. 



Ohio and Penn. Towns 
To Vote on Sunday Pix 



T! 



Cambridge, O. — The Sunday movi 1 ' 
question has bobbed back up hei 
with recommendation by a commi 
tee of the Municipal Council th£ 
it be submitted for referendum ne> 
Fall. 

All efforts to have Sunday movie]" 
here have been rejected by the vo ' 
ers in the past. Issue has beef 
brought up this time through/ 
nels trying to secure Sunday rl 
tion for service men. 



Youngstown, O. — A referendui 

vote on Sunday movies will be takejuj 
this year at Greenville (Pa.) ne^ e 
here. Backers of the plan hold th^f 
Sunday shows would provide ente:jf ( 
tainment for soldiers from near-tf 
Camp Shenango. 



:, 



NEW YORK 
THEATERS 



ih 



RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL 

ROCKEFELLER CENTER 

THE YOUNGEST PROFESSION 



with 

VIRGINIA WEIOLER, EDWARD ARNOLD 

and Five Important Guest Stars 

AN M-G-M PICTURE 

MARCH OF TIME— "INVASION" 

Gala Stage Revue • Symphony Orchestra 

First Mezzanine Seats Reserved. Clrel* 6-460 J 



-- 



BETTY GRABLE 



GEORGE MONTGOMERY* CESAR ROMERO le 

COW* UlAMD 



:£■ 



a 2oth century-fox PiCTUDE in TECHNICOLOR 

* PLUS A BIG STAGE SHOW * 

BUY Q ^ y W 7lhAVE. 

BONDS !\V A 1 50th ST. 



"DIXIE" • I" Person 

with ~k ANDREWS SISTES 

BING CROSBY * TIM HERBERT 

DOROTHY LAMOL'R -jfc- MITCHELL AYRE 

A Paramount Picture -fa and his orchestra 



Cool 



PARAMOUNT Times Squar< 



EH33 



B'WAY 
47th St. 



PI 



>>• 



GEO. SANDERS . MAUREEN O'HARA 

"THIS LAND IS MINE" 

and 

"CHATTERBOX" 

JOE E. BROWN • JUDY CANOVA 





Irhursday, July 1, 1943 



TW 



DAILY 



[anuck's First Pic 
'Woodrow Wilson 



rr 



■ \7est Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Joseph M. Schenck 

nnounced that Col. Darryl F. Za- 

uck will return to 20th-Fox July 6 

) assume charge of production. He 



jK Zanuck will devote most of his 
a to the production of pictures of 
fonal and international signifi- 



i ance, first of which will he "Wood- 
j jw Wilson." 

l j Zanuck said, "In returning to the 
fe idustry, I feel greatly honored to 
3 2 charged with the respossibility 
f c producing a picture based on the 
! | fe of Woodrow Wilson and others 
W this scope and importance. 

"Pictures of this type are of the 

_tmost importance today and for 

Tie post-war world, for I am con- 

inced that they not only have a 

tal meaning, but at the same time 

mtain dramatic elements that go 

i make fine entertainment. 

"At this time I wish to thank all 

i roducers, directors, writers and 

■-;her fellow-workers who carried on 

> magnificently in my absence and 

/ their loyalty and efficiency helped 

ji> maintain the success and high 

estige of 20th-Fox product." 



)PA Driving Ban May 
Shutter Suburban Nabes 



r Newark, N. J. — Week-end b.o. biz 

J n; the nabes along the outskirts of 

ijJie city, has hit a new low in past 

,'ieeks, direct result of the pleasure- 

H'iving ban, clearly indicating that 

iyme of the smaller independents 

■,ay be forced to close temporarily 

• at least until such time as the 

m is lifted. 

' "It's simple arithmetic," one man- 
ner declared. "Theatergoers who 
ve in the outskirts and the suburbs, 
ce remaining at home through most 
the week. By the time Saturday 
id Sunday rolls around, they're 
1 fed up and rarin' to go and will 
i ffer the inconvenience of a long 
~"ip in a crowded bus to get down- 
Twn for a first-run. In their shoes, 
-H probably do the very same thing." 




Jlivia de Havilland 

M. A. Schlesinger 

Charles Laughton 

William Wyler 

Don Eddy 

Irving Kahal 

Charles D. Brown 

Madge Evans 



Jeanne Crozat 

K. H. Cochrane 

0. P. Madsen 

Helen Weber 

H. W. Rosch 

A. Aronson 

A. M. Brilant 

Don Beddoe 



THE 






;\M l"*" ^q> -^ ^^^ 

5^ 

US 

I, 

T T T 

• • • YE EDITOR, discussing the changing movie audience, not 
so long ago pontificated — as editors will — upon the plight of the exhibi- 
tor's peactime standby, meaning the family of the mythical Mister X, 

salaried white collar worker It was duly noted that Mister X's living 

costs and taxes have soared skywards like a frightened mountain goat 
during the last few years while his pay envelope has failed to fatten 
And it was observed that thus Mister X might be said to have ac- 
tually taken a sizeable salary slash, with the obvious inference that in- 
sofar as Mister X is concerned — and his number is legion — the Washing- 
ton talk of excess purchasing power is so much piffle 

T ▼ T 

• • • ALL of which makes extremely interesting what Rep. Wil- 
liam B. Barry, D., N. Y., had to say in the House this week The 

distinguished solon from Queens County told President Roosevelt in a 
letter that the moves to kill food subsidies would keep millions of 
white collar workers away from the nation's film theaters, for— to quote 
the Representative— "if they go to movies, they won't be able 

to eat" And, added the St. Albans lawyer who has been in the 

House since 1935, theater box offices have already suffered 

T T ▼ 

• • • WHETHER film biz's interest in the price roll-back and sub- 
sidy moves is academic or otherwise, certainly the trade must be con- 
cerned with the Department of Labor figures quoted by Mr. Barry 

When food costs in 56 cities rise 46.2 per cent in 17 months and pay in- 
creases in the same period total only 15 per cent, and even such pay in- 
creases do not go to millions of white collar workers, there is a distinct 

threat to the box office Mark, too, that the Congressman makes no 

mention of the materially higher taxes nor of other increases in living 

costs And already the Treasury's tax sharps are plotting stiffer 

levies, with a view to enactment early in the new year Maybe it 

isn't the business of this industry to fight the battle of any particular 

group But whether it is or not, surely self-interest alone ■warrants 

the trade to give a thought or two to the plight of Mister X and his kin 

After all, they have been loyal customers, week in and week out, 

in the halcyon days of peace And in the post-war period, when the 

war workers have retreated to the Smokies, it is to Mister X, et al, that 

the industry must look again for not only profits but sustenance 

Make no mistake about that, pal 

T ▼ ▼ 

• # m CUFF Notes: Ann Corio will tour RKO theaters in the 

East again in October, with her salary boosted to §1,750 a week 

Meanwhile, she'll appear in another for Monogram, dubbed "The Sul- 
tan's Daughter". ... Add how to spend a vacation in wartime: 
Manager John Hesse, of the Roger Sherman, New Haven, will 
spend the next fortnight moving into a new home in Spring Glen. . . . 
9 New York debut of RKO's "Bombardier" at Loew's Criterion tomor- 
row night will attract Carl L. Norden, bombsight inventor, and mem- 
bers of the Norden organization's Old Timers Club. ... * Final 
shooting day of "The Night is Ending" at 20th-Fox saw the entire staff 
and crew feting Director Leonide Mo guy at luncheon. ... 9 If min- 
iature rooms interest you, don't miss Jerome H. Hoffheimer's collection 
now on view in the Radio City Music Hall's grand lounge. ... Play- 
ers speaking "below the border" languages will be featured in future 
Harry Sherman Hopalong Cassidy pix 



• • • AVENGE PEARL HARBOR!. 



DATE BOOK 



Today: Theater industry's $130,000,000 "Shangri- 
La" war stamp drive starts. 

July 1-3: Warners regional sales meeting, New 
York. 

July 6: 20th-Fox special stockholders meeting, 
home office. 

July 6-10: Warners regional sales meeting, 
Chicago. 

July 12-14: RKO Radio sales meeting, Waldorf- 
Astoria. 

July 14-15: Kansas-Missouri Theaters Association 
convention, Kansas City. 

July 14-15: Conference Board of National Con- 
ference of the Entertainment Industry for 
War Activities meets at Actors Equity. 

July 14-17: Paramount semi-annual sales meet- 
ing, Hotel Pierre. 

July 15-17: Warner' regional sales meeting, 
San Francisco. 

July 29: Loew's stockholders special meeting, 
home office. 

Aug. 11-12: Allied board meeting, Baltimore. 

Sept. 9: ITOA installation luncheon, Hotel 
Astor. 



Legion Theatrical Post 
Headed by Sam Cornelia 

Detroit — Theatrical Post of the 
American Legion has elected as new 
officers for 1943-44: commander, Sam 
Cornelia, Panoram operator; senior 
vice-commander, Harry R. Berns, 
New Bijou Theater; junior vice-com- 
mander, Edmund Burke, Main Thea- 
ter, Royal Oak; adjutant, Harry 
Brewer, Harper Theater; finance of- 
ficer, H. Owen Bliugh, Calvin Thea- 
ter, Dearborn; sergeant-at-arms, Ed- 
ward O'Flynn, musician; executive 
committeeman, William Marley, Na- 
tional Theater Engineering Co,; 
chaplain, Fred R. Johnson, musician; 
historian, Lee Crowell, Fox Theater; 
district delegates, Harry Carson and 
Gil Light, Michigan Theater; district 
delegates, Harry Carson and Max 
Kolin, Oriole Theater. 



M.P. Relief Funds' 
Year's Receipts $754,861 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Treasurer George 
Bagnall of the Motion Picture Relief 
Fund reports the organization has a 
surplus of $1,351,581 and that total 
receipts in 1942 amounted to $428,- 
427.82 and expenses to $448,461.62. 
Funds received from the radio shows 
increased total receipts to $754,- 
861.04. 

Jean Hersholt was re-elected presi- 
dent. 



WEDDING BELLS 



Lt. Robert Gilbert, former office 
manager for the Staak and Pierce 
Theaters, Inc., at Oskaloosa, la., was 
married to Margaret Lally of Des 
Moines. The marriage took place 
at Cheraw,, S. C. Gilbert is an as- 
sistant special service officer at Mor- 
ris Field, Charlotte, N. C. 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Betty Grable and 

Harry James plan to be married at 

Las Vegas, Nev., over the week-end. 





Shangri-La" War Stamp 
Drive in July- Join up! 



DULY 



Thursday, July 1, 1943 



SAG Suspends Craig 
As Member for 1 Year 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — The Screen Actors 
Guild has suspended from member- 
ship, for a period of one year, Hal 
Craig, a Class B member. 

Craig was found guilty of con- 
duct unbecoming a member of the 
Guild, at a trial before the board 
of directors on June 28. Specific 
basfs of the charge was that Craig 
filed with Paul V. McNutt, chairman 
of War Manpower Commission, and 
caused to be published a statement 
that the Guild was "producer-con- 
trolled," having a producer as its 
president and other producers as its 
board of directors. 

In announcing- results of disciplinary ac- 
tion ag-ainst Craig', the Screen Actors Guild 
said: 

"Trial of Craig disclosed that his statement 
was made recklessly, without supporting 
facts. He was represented by counsel and 
goven an opportunity to present supporting 
evidence from witnesses. He introduced no 
evidence from witnesses. 

"Craig admitted at the hearing' that he 
had no evidence that the Guild was domin- 
ated or controlled by the motion picture 
producers. When his testimony was sifted, 
it was reduced to an unsupported allegation 
that the Guild might not properly represent 
its members because two out of the 33 
members of the board had what Craig 
regarded as employer status. 

"These two board members were identi- 
fied as James Cagney, president of the 
Guild, and Charles Boyer, a director. The 
Guild introduced evidence that Cagney was 
financially interested in company which 
produces only pictures in which Cagney ren- 
ders services as an actor, and that Boyer 
is an employe of Universal as an actor and 
actor-producer, and that he has no financial 
interest in the company. 

"Record of Cagney and Boyer in devoting 
their time to Guild duties in interests of 
all actors speaks for itself. There is nothing 
in that record, much less in Craig's testi- 
mony, to support the belief that these two 
out of 33 Guild board members could — 
if they wanted — -make the Guild 'producer 
controlled.' 

"The Guild proceeded with disciplinary ac- 
tion against Craig', with full realization that 
the question of free speech would be raised. 
The Guild has always welcomed criticism 
with constructive motives, but Craig's reck- 
less charge could only be destructive. Free 
speech does not embrace the right to shout 
'fire' in a crowded theater. 

"The Guild board has a responsibility to 
protect the record and reputation of the 
organization. In the interests of all mem- 
bers. Craig's statement was particularly 
injurious at this time when the Guild is 
attempting to establish a self-governing unit 
for extra players, and simultaneously is 
attempting to negotiate for improvements 
for extras in contracts with producers. The 
effort to establish an autonomous unit for 
extras has been delayed by obstructionist 
tactics on the part of extra groups strug- 
gling for power, and Craig's statement served 
to abet the activities of these groups and 
injure the interests of extra players gen- 
erally. 

"Through disciplinary action against Craig, 
the Guild affirms its intention of protecting 
the interests and reputation of the entire 
organization." 



REVIEWS Of SHORT SUBJECTS 



(M-G-M Cartoon) 

"Who Killed Who" 

M-G-M 8 Mins. 

Mildly Entertaining 

Every now and then the cartoon 
fashioners are tempted into mak- 
ing a travesty of the blood-and- 
thunder crime theme. Herewith is 
the latest. For the most part it 
is amusing, and should be satis- 
factorily received by the fans. Es- 
sentially its appeal springs from 
rapid action and tricky animation. 
But it has virtually no story. Such 
as the latter is, it delineates the ef- 
forts of an exaggerated detective 
to find out who killed the aged oc- 
cupant of a mansion. Ghosts and 
all manner of eerie 



"The Lonesome Mouse" 

M-G-M 8 mins. 

Fair 

A Technicolor cartoon with a lim- 
ited number of laughs. It is likely 
to appeal primarily to the kids. The 
characters are a mouse and a cat. 
The mouse rejoices when the cat is 
put out of the house. Loneliness puts 
a quick end to his rejoicing. Most 
of the footage has to do with his 
efforts to get the cat back into the 
house. Once the cat is back both 
start fighting all over again. 



IN NEW POSTS 



LESTER COLE, assistant, Paramount Theater, 

New Haven. 
WILLIAM DEWAN, manager, RKO-Schine Palace, 

Syracuse. 
TED EMERSON, manager, Paramount Theater, 

Omaha. 
EMMETT L0CKARD, manager, Omaha Theater, 

Omaha. 
HARRY WOOLFE, United Artists branch maj 

Vancouver. 



'< 



forms bob out of closets, cellar, et 

al, to furnish suspense and humor. 

ectoplasmic ' Mark it down as mildly entertaining. 



Open War Stamp Drive 
To Build "Shangri-La" 

(Continued from Page 1) 

is $80,000,000 more than the average 
month's sales of stamps — will be ear- 
marked for construction of an air- 
plane carrier to be named the Shan- 
gri-La. 

This particular promotion has 
excited the interest of exhibitors 
because of the reasonableness of the 
request; it is felt there will be few 
"turn-downs" since the moviegoer 
will be asked to buy only an extra 
dollar's worth. 

In addition to the special clips 
prepared by the Newsreel Division 
in Hollywood, and featuring Hedy 
Lamarr, Maria Montez and Lynn 
Bari with Captain Ted Lawson, one 
of the Tokio raiders, the War De- 
partment has advised that there will 
be another sequence filmed in North 
Africa. This sequence will "star" 
Gen. Jimmy Doolittle purchasing 
stamps from a Red Cross nurse. 



Reserves Decision On 
Racketeer Dismissal Plea 



Gronigen Buys Iowa 
Houses of March Bros. 



Rene Chouteau Gets Wings 

St. Louis — Rene Chauteau, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Henri Chouteau, has been 
commissioned a 2nd lieutenant in the 
Marine Air Corps, following gradua- 
tion from the flying school in Pen- 
sacola, Fla. His brother Capt. Henri 
Chouteau of the Royal Air Force 
Ferry Command was killed in an 
airplane accident three weeks ago. 
His father formerly owned the Lib- 
erty Theater. 



Alton, la. — John Gronigen has 
purchased theaters in Alton and 
Orange City, from the March 
brothers. 



Small at Goldwyn Studios 

West Coast Bureau Of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Edward Small Pro- 
ductions has completed negotiations 
for space at Samuel Goldwyn Stu- 
dios. Small is now at General Ser- 
vice Studios and will move into his 
new headquarters shortly. This 
makes the fourth United Artists 
producer to come to the Goldwyn lot 
this year. Others are Cagney Pro- 
ductions, Samuel Bronson Produc- 
tions and Spitz-Skirball. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

tions attacked the sufficiency of the 
indictment from a legal standpoint. 
Another is a special plea through 
which defense counsel hopes to prove 
-that the statute of limitations bars 
prosecution under the extortion in- 
dictment. The third is a demand 
for a bill of particulars. 

Defense counsel, James D. C. Mur- 
ray, in pleading for the motions, ac- 
cused George E. Browne and William 
Bioff, former IATSE executives, of 
"attempting to obtain surcease from 
their sorrows by effecting a general 
jail delivery of my clients." Mur- 
ray intimated that the recent ex- 
tension of the term of the New York 
Federal Court in the cases of 
Browne and Bioff, who are now 
serving sentences of eight and 10 
years, respectively, prompted them 
to involve his clients in the Federal 
probe of alleged racketeering in the 
film industry. 

Murray asked for a delay in the 
trial of the case to Sept. 7 on the 
grounds of difficulty in rounding up 
witnesses. The court indicated that 
postponement might be granted and 
told Murray to confer with Special 
Assistant U. S. Attorney General 
Boris Kostelanetz on the proposed 
delay. 



No Freon Relief in 
Sight for Theaters 



Hitchcock Pix Withdrawn 

Film Classics, Inc. has withdrawn 
"The Lady Vanishes" and "The Girl 
Was Young" from release and will 
offer the Alfred Hitchcock pictures 
as a combined Hitchcock program. 
New prints- and accessories are in 
preparation. 



Forrest Kelly Stricken 

Massillon, O. — Forrest A. Kelly, 
53, former manager of the Lincoln 
theater here for 20 years, died while 
seated in his automobile at Chagrin 
Falls. 



Mrs. Wilkinson Dead 

Wilmington, Del. — Mrs. Anna Wil- 
kinson, mother of Charles Wilkin- 
son, assistant manager of the Com- 
erford, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., died at 
her home here. 



Carl Duncan Dead 

Canton, O. — Carl Duncan, owner 
and operator of the Killbuck theater 
at nearby Killbuck died in Coshocton 
hospital, where he recently under- 
went an operation. His widow and 
a son survive. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

WPB amusments chief, wrote Ar- 
thur W. Mayer of the WAC Yester- 
day. Although at least one major 
theater in Pittsburgh may be forced 
to close its doors because of the 
ban on sale of the refrigerant, there 
is only a slim chance that relief will 
be offered. 

Smith explained that freon is pro- 
duced by only one plant in the 
country, and that nearly three times 
this plant's annual capacity of 
1,200,000 pounds could be used. Half 
this capacity is allocated for ci- 
vilian use, but nearly all goes into 
food preservation, etc. Substitution 
of methyl chloride is possible, but 
it is not advised because methyl is 
a toxic poison. Its use is barred by 
law in many localities. In addition, 
its use would require changes in 
the ajr conditioning system for which 
priority could not be extended. 

He has been assured by the Gen- 
eral Industrial Equipment Division 
of WPB, Smith wrote, "that there 
has not been, nor will there be any 
discrimination in the uses of freon 
refrigerant for comfort cooling pur- 
poses. He has further assured us 
that if the restrictions are relaxed 
and the demands for freon for es- 
sential war uses decreases, the 
motion picture industry will be 
given equal consideration with other 
civilian enterprises using air con- 
ditioning for comfort cooling. 

"In clarifying this statement, this 
means that where air conditioning 
for comfort cooling is incidental to 
the benefits of a business enter- 
prise, such as a department store, 
office building (public or private) 
or any other type of civilian busi- 
ness that motion picture theaters 
will receive equal consideration. 

"We are unable, at this time to 
estimate when the restrictions will 
be relaxed, but we can assure you 
that the industry will be informed 
of any changes as quickly as the B 
information is relayed to us by Mr. | 
Millham of the General Industrial 
Equipment Division." 



: 

%■■■■ 

noti 

I 
Lii 
let 
! ; . 

k 

h 

: 

res I 



Add 10 Per cent License Penalty 
Harrisburg, Pa.— Theaters, places 
of amusement, brokers and auction- 
eers, have been notified by the treas- 
urer's office that beginning July 1, 
a 10 per cent additional penalty will 
be added to all unpaid mercantile 
licenses. 



al" 
k 

ft; 
I 



ITT; ; 

ota! 



Thursday, July I, 1943 



<?$ 



DAILY 



Mayer, Rubin, Bernstein, Weingarten to Renew 



Loew Stockholders to Act 
July 29; Pacts Run to '46; 
Three Years More Possible 



(Continued from Page 1) 

-Y-v appealed for retention of the 
Varices of the four executives for 
o«e good of the company. 

"I have arranged these extensions 
in harmony with our policy to ob- 
tain and hold the best available 
men," he said, "for it is my belief 
that the success of our enterprise is 
due to the manpower that operates 
it. It is my personal opinion that 
the retention of these executives 
through the renewal of their con- 
tracts is in the best interests of the 
company and the stockholders." 

New Pacts Expire Aug. 31, 1946 

Each of the proposed contracts, 
which have been recommended by 
the audit and finance committee of 
the company and authorized by the 
board of directors, is for a term 
expiring Aug. 31, 1946, Schenck in- 
formed the stockholders, "with pro- 
vision for a further extension of 
three years upon notice by the com- 
pany and acceptance thereof by the 
other party." 

Schenck's statement to the stock- 
holders disclosed that Mayer, man- 
aging director of production, had 
been serving the company without a 
contract since the expiration of his 
old agreement on Dec. 31, 1942. 
"Pending negotiations for a new con- 
tract, he has continued to render 
services, leaving the matter of com- 
pensation for future adjustment, 
Schenck pointed out. 

The contracts of Bernstein, a vice- 
president and treasurer; Rubin, a 
vice-president and general counsel, 
and Weingarten, production super- 
visor, terminate on Dec. 31, 1943. 
All new contracts have the same ex- 
piration date, Aug. 31, 1946. 

Get Same Pay and Bonus 

The four executives will receive 
the same rate of weekly compensa- 
tion and bonus payment under the 
new agreements, according to the 
notice to stockohlders. Mayer has 
been getting $3,000 per week, plus 
3.77 per cent of the combined annual 
let profits; Bernstein, $2,000, plus 
L% per cent bonus; Rubin, $2,000, 
plus a bonus of 1.4 per cent; Wein- 
garten, $3,250, plus a bonus of 
35/100ths of one per cent. 

The proxy statement lists earn- 
ngs for the four men for the fiscal 
rear ended Aug. 31, 1942, as follows: 

Mayer— $157,500, fixed salary; 
;792,265.84, bonus; $949,765.84, to- 
al. 

Bernstein— $106,000, fixed salary; 
175,719.95, bonus; $281,719.95, to- 
al. 

Rubin— $103,000, fixed salary; 
163,836.36, bonus; $269,836.36, to- 
al. 

Weingarten — $170,625, fixed sal- 
ary; $41,001.32, bonus; $211,626.32, 
otal. 

The notice to stockholders revealed 



HOLLYWOOD DIGEST 



SIGNED 

MISCHA AUER, termer, 20rh-Fox. 

ASSIGNMENTS 

JEAN YARBOROUCH, producer-director, "Hi 

Ya Sailor," Universal. 
IRVING RAPPER, director, "Rhapsody in Blue," 

Warners. 
JACK FIER, producer, "Cyclone Prairie Rangers," 

Columbia. 
MARION PARSONNET, screenplay, "The Ghost 

ot Monte Cristo," Edward Small. 
DAWN POWELL, screenplay, "Time to Be Born," 

Edward Small. 
EDDIE KAY, production manager, "Teen Age," 

Continetal. 
ED KULL, cameraman, "Teen Age," Con- 
tinental. 

CASTINGS 

OSCAR LEVANT, "Rhapsody in Blue," Warners- 
MISCHA AUER, "State Fair," 20th-Fox; JOHN 
CARRADINE, WALLY BROWN, and ALAN 
CARNAY, "An American Story," RKO; 



ALLEN JONES, EVELYN ANKERS and BILLIE 
BURKE, "You're a Lucky Fellow, Mr. Smith," 
Universal; DONALD WOODS, "Hi Ya 
Sailor," Universal; BARRY FITZGERALD, "The 
Padre," Paramount; HORACE McNALLY, "Ameri- 
ca," M-G-M; EMMA DUNN and LIONEL ROYCE, 
"The Cross of Lorraine," M-C-M; JUNE DUPREZ, 
"Talent School," Jack Schwarz-PRC; VERNELL 
VERNON, "Tiger Fangs," Jack Schwarz-PRC; 
THURSTON HALL and RAFAEL STORM, "Foot- 
light Clamour," Columbia; JIMMY DAVIS, 
"Cyclone Prairie Rangers, "Columbia; LENORE 
AUBERT, "Up in Arms," Samuel Coldwyn. 

BETTY HUTTON, "Incendiary Blonde," Para- 
mount; JIMMY DUNDEE, GEORGIA CAINE and 
ESTHER HOWARD, "Hail the Conquering Hero," 
Paramount. 

TITLE SWITCHES 

"The Cross of Lorraine," formerly "A Thousand 
Shall Fall," M-G-M. 

CASTING WITHDRAWALS 

HENRY WILCOXCN, out of "The Story of Dr. 
Wassell," Paramount. 



Cuban Spanish Pix Houses i City-Operated Theater 
Forced to Slash Scales I Pays Northampton Well 



Havana (By Air Mail — Passed by 
Censor) — First-run theaters here, 
devoted to the release of Spanish 
product, have been forced to slash 
their admission scales of 40-50 cents 
to an all-day level of 29 cents. Step 
has been taken because these stands 
realize that without air conditioning 
equipment, such as serves the so- 
called luxury houses, it is impos- 
sible to compete unless there is a 
financial-saving inducement. While 
the action of the houses is one of 
extremity, it has been taken in good 
spirit, prompted by the realization 
that no air conditioning equipment 
can possibly be available until the 
war's end, and that the scale-cut- 
ting is the price which must be paid 
for economic survival. 

Principal houses exhibiting U. S. 
films here are all equipped with air 
conditioning units. 



Northampton, Mass. — Operated 
under the supervision of its board 
of trustees for the past six months, 
the Academy of Music, municipally- 
owned and operated motion picture 
theater, has earned a net income of 
approximately $4,500, it was dis- 
closed here. This sum represents 
more revenue than the city received 
from the theater over a combined 
period of the past five to seven years 
when it was under private manage- 
ment. 

Theater will remain open through- 
out the Summer. 



Last Buffalo Drive-in Folds 

Buffalo — Harlem Road Drive-In, 
has shuttered due to the pleasure 
driving ban. Stand was the last 
Drive-In in this territory to hold out 
against the gas shortage. 



that Mayer had agreed to waive fixed 
salary payments for the first four 
months of this year. The terms of 
his contract would be effective as of 
Jan. 1, 1943. 

Bonuses are to be computed on the 
basis of net earnings from compa- 
nies and ventures in which Loew's, 
Inc., owns an interest of 25 per 
cent or more and dividends or re- 
ceipts from all other companies and 
ventures. 

Deductions Before Bonuses 

Under their new contracts for the 
four executives would not be al- 
lowed to share in profits until the 
following deductions were made 
from net earnings: 

1 — $2,745,744, representing $2 per 
share on the issued and outstanding 
common stock of Loew's at Jan. 1, 
1943, other than shares issued as a 
stock dividend. 

2 — $2 per year on each share of 
common thereafter issued for cash 
or property. 



3 — Cumulative dividends on any 
preferred stock of Loew's (not ex- 
ceeding seven per cent per annum) 
and dividends on preferred stock of 
the companies in which Loew's has 
a stock interest (to the extent that 
such preferred stock is held by others 
than the company). 

4 — All taxes, except taxes arising 
from profits on sale or exchange of 
property where such profits are not 
included as income for the benefit of 
the participant. 

5 — Interest on bonds, mortgages 
and moneys borrowed and amortiza- 
tion of bonuses and expenses in con- 
nection therewith and in connection 
with issues of preferred stock. 

6 — All fixed compensation paid but 
no percentage compensation based 
on the combined net profits of the 
company paid or payable to any em- 
ploye or executive. 

7 — Depreciation on the Culver City 
studio and on all other real and 
personal property. 



Saturday Midnight 
Pix Click in Towns 



Dallas — Saturday midnight shows 
instituted by B. R. McLendon in his 
Texan Tri-States Theaters, head- 
quartering in Atlanta, for a group 
of very small towns, nine at present, 
have endured for 11 years, and make 
one of the three profitable playtimes 
of the week. Other profitable days 
are Saturday, with westerns, and 
Sunday, when "A" pictures are 
played. This experience has set a 
pattern which other exhibitors have 
followed. 

Booking policy from the beginning 
has been horrors, murder mysteries, 
musicals, and suitable "B" releases, 
all on flat rental. Shows have been 
sold at prevailing top box-office 
scales, 25c or 30c, according to the 
town, without the stimulation of 
giveaways or other extraneous pro- 
motion. Success was gained through 
consistent booking and careful at- 
tention to the cultivation of this 
show. 

McLendon has found two facts: 
rural trade in town for Saturday 
shopping attend the afternoon or 
evening show and remain over for 
the midnight show; and that he gets 
a patronage for the midnight show 
that does not attend any other time. 
This second group he finds to be 
regular attendants week after week. 



N. J. Allied Re-elects 
Loewenstein Prexy 

'(Continued from Page 1) 

elected vice-president for the north- 
ern New Jersey unit and Ralph Wilk- 
ins was elected vice-president for the 
Southern unit. Dave Mate was re- 
elected secretary; Dave Snaper, 
treasurer, and Ed Lachman, assis- 
tant treasurer, the later, a new post. 
Morris Spewak was re-elected ser- 
geant at arms. 

Elected to the board of directors 
were Basil Zeigler, John Harwan, 
Morris Spewak, Jacob Unger and 
named as ex-ofncio members were the 
following former presidents of the 
unit: George Gold, Sidney Samuel- 
son, Lee Newbury and Irving Dol- 
linger. 



Dollinger V.-P. of N. J. 
Allied's Eastern Unit 

West End, N. J. — Irving Dollinger 
was elected vice-president of Allied 
Eastern regional units at the New 
Jersey conference yesterday. Dol- 
linger said that because of the many 
problems now facing the independent 
exhibitors, he expected to hold reg- 
ional meetings every six months, 
transportation permitting. 



Managing Army Theaters 

Chicago — Lt. J. E. Petrakovic, for- 
merly with Allied here, is now man- 
ager of Army theaters at Camp 
Ellis. 



—Wk. 




\ 







<j 




C/3 



CT« t^ ^O 



o 

Q. 



03 



UJ 




10 



0i\ DAILY 



Thursday, July 1, 1943 



Family Attendance 
Seen War Casualty 



Grand Rapids, Mich. — This city's 
theaters thus far have not felt too 
keenly the manpower pinch. Women 
have not taken over other than ush- 
ering jobs, but doors are now man- 
ned by elderly men instead of youths. 
Butterfield houses have lost about 
a score, mostly doormen and ushers. 

Downtown theaters report at- 
tendance up in all houses due in 
part to the fact that patrons can 
reach theaters easily by bus, but 
they can't drive places in their own 
cars for entertainment. Money is 
plentiful and the Army Weather 
School has given the city a whole 
new population in the thousands. 

Neighborhood theaters report at- 
tendance down from 25 to 40 per 
cent. Families no longer attend as 
a unit; mother or father are often 
on the night shift. Swing of popu- 
lation from outer districts to the 
more crowded area is also visible. 

Longer runs such as those regis- 
tered by "Random Harvest" and 
"Yankee Doodle Dandy" have been 
enthusiastically received by both 
first and second-run houses, but there 
is a definite cry from all houses that 
Hollywood is putting out too many 
war films. 



Need a Key? Charlotte 
Likes to Give 'Em Away 



Charlotte, N. C. — Special advance 
showing of "Mission to Moscow" 
given by Warners with Walter Du- 
ranty as speaker, attracted more 
than 200 newspaper men, exhibi- 
tors, radio commentators, educators 
and city officials yesterday. 

Duranty was met at the station 
by an official delegation including 
Mayor Herbert H. Baxter, who pre- 
sented him with a key to the city. 
A second key to the city was given 
to Duranty later by C. 0. Kuester, 
executive vice-president of the Char- 
lotte Chamber of Commerce. 

Following the preview at the Ho- 
tel Charlotte, Duranty gave a 15- 
minute address, which was broadcast 
over WSOC. The Variety Club then 
played host at a cocktail party. 

Mike Kincey, of the Wilby & Kin- 
cey circuit; H. H. Everett, of Everett 
Enterprises, Tom Little, local exhib., 
John G. Bachman, Warner branch 
manager, and Mitchell Rawson of 
the Warner home office were among 
the film reps, on hand. 

Newspapers in Greenville, Colum- 
bia, and other surrounding towns 
sent special reporters to Charlotte 
to interview Duranty. 



Second Carrier Drops 
Conn. Friday Pickups 

New Haven — Announcement that 
Decker's delivery, in addition to Ro- 
sen's, will eliminate Friday pickup 
of film, has complicated the bookers' 
troubles here further. 



Loses Move to Keep Film Unit 

Attempt to Get $250,000 for OWI Fails 



{Continued f 

aid the industry to produce motion 
pictures of its own and to direct non- 
theatrical distribution of 16 mm. 
films was voted yesterday by the Sen- 
ate when it rejected by a vote of 
40-34 the amendment to the War 
Agencies Appropriations Bill offered 
by Senator Joseph O'Mahoney, 
Wyoming Democrat. O'Mahoney had 
proposed that the $50,000 finally 
recommended by the Senate Appro- 
priations Committee for the motion 
picture bureau, headed by Lowell 
Mellett, be increased to $250,000— 
which sum was only $25,000 short 
of what OWI Director Elmer Davis 
had declared was needed to enable 
the bureau to continue to function 
as a co-ordinating agency serving the 
Government and the motion picture 
industry. 

Although the committee had orig- 
inally intended to recommend no 
funds for the motion picture bureau, 
it finally compromised on $50,000 — 
even though it had been told that 
that sum would be money wasted, 
that the bureau might just as well be 
cut off entirely. There was no indica- 
tion as to what Lowell Mellett's next 
move will be although it seems a 
fact that he will continue to work 
with the motion picture industry. 
Funds have been provided in the 
bill for liquidation of production and 
other projects now under way by the 
bureau, and the $50,000, provided it 
remains in the bill through the con- 
ference with House representatives, 
will be available for current opera- 
tion of the bureau. 

One possibility is that Mellett, 
whose salary has never been paid by 
OWI, will remain with OWI as di- 
rector of motion picture activities 
using the $50,000 to pay the salaries 
of three or four key men and to 
cover travel expenses, etc., for these 
men. Another possibility is that he 
will no longer be with OWI but will 
be assigned by the President, on 
whose advisory staff he is, to con- 
tinue to be active in aiding the mo- 
tion picture industry. In this case 
he would probably retain actual au- 
thority over the OWI motion picture 
activities, but would be completely 
independent of OWI authority. 
Chairman McKellar in Disagreement 

In making his report to the Senate, 
Chairman McKellar of the Appro- 
priations Committee indicated that 
he was in disagreement with his col- 
leagues in their action on the OWI. 
The agency "ought not to be gutted 
in any way such as this," he said. 
Speaking specifically of the Motion 
Picture Bureau, McKellar said that 
the committee recommendation of 
$50,000 for its activities amounts to 
"destruction" of the Bureau. Mo- 
tion pictures are the outstanding 
medium of war information, he said, 
and must be aided in every way. 

Sen. Millard Tydings, Maryland 
Democrat, and son-in-law of Joseph 
E. Davis, former Ambassador to 
Moscow, opposed the amendment 



rom Page 1) 

offered by Sen. Joseph O'Mahoney, 
Wyoming, Democrat, to increase the 
funds for the Domestic Bureau to the 
$5,500,000 recommended by _ the 
House Appropriations Committee. 
O'Mahoney made it plain that he 
wished to see the Motion Picture 
Bureau carry on its activities as 
heretofore, and praised its produc- 
tion activities in glowing terms. He 
suggested that $250,000 be allowed 
the Mellett bureau as a compromise 
measure. 

Disagree on Value of OWI Work 

Tydings revealed that there was 
much disagreement among the Sen- 
ators on the Appropriations Commit- 
tee as to the value of the work done 
by the various divisions of the OWI. 
As for the Motion Picture Bureau, 
however, he said that it was well 
known that both the Army and the 
Navy are making films for training 
purposes and for civilian showing, 
and "the big motion picture com- 
panies are putting out what are sup- 
posed to be masterpieces." He re- 
ferred specifically to Warners' "Air 
Force," asking what better aid to 
victory could be produced on cellu- 
loid than that picture. "OWI cer- 
tainly can't do better," said Tydings. 

He said $50,000 provided for liaison 
work by the Motion Picture Bureau 
is actually "liberal" at which point 
Senator McKellar arose to term the 
$50,000 provision "parsimonious, if 
that's not parsimonious, I don't know 
what it is," said McKellar. 

Early in the session, McKellar read 
to the Senate a letter from OWI Di- 
rector Elmer Davis, in which Davis 
expressed his willingness to dis- 
pense with motion picture produc- 
tion by OWI and other agency func- 
tions. 

"The sub-committee has allowed 
$50,000 for the Motion Picture Bur- 
eau," wrote Davis. "We are required 
to clear and approve all Government 
motion pictures, and to maintain liai- 
son with the industry in its rela- 
tionship with the Federal Govern- 
ment. Performance of these services, 
with all other activities of our Mo- 
tion Picture Bureau eliminated, 
would cost about $275,000, and would 
materially help the motion picture in- 
dustry in its desire to produce pic- 
tures useful to the war effort. An 
appropriation of $50,000 for the Mo- 
tion Picture Bureau would be utterly 
insufficient for that purpose, and 
would accordingly be $50,000 wast- 
ed." 

Discontinuance Offer by Davis 

Davis made it plain that OWI was 
willing to eliminate all but the above 
functions of the Motion Picture Bur- 
eau, and offering to do so as well as 
to discontinue issuing pamphlets and 
publications on controversial issues. 
He asked that $7,435,000 be appro- 
priated for the OWI domestic branch 
to carry on its other functions. 

O'Mahoney's amendment, includ- 
ing the additional $200,000 for the 
Motion Picture Bureau, was opposed 



Exhib. Aggressiveness 
Urged on Pic Rentals 



(Continued from Page 1) 

the Hollywood Hotel here. In other 
words, Samuelson urged exhibitors 
to "get tough" and not let them- 
selves be salved by the exchanges. ^ 

Samuelson said the most vj^" 
problem facing the independent 1 
hibitors today was the increasing*' 
pressure placed on them through 
"gadgets" in film contracts, which 
are like having a healthy arm on 
a decayed body, he said, claiming 
that the distributors had the healthy 
arm when the rest of the industry 
is "going to the devil." 

He warned that the New Jersey ex- 
hibitors were not going to allow the 
war emergency to submerge the high 
film rental situation. The issue must 
be solved in an economic manner 
and not by going to the exchanges 
"with a tin cup" and expecting any 
relief. 

In a questions and answers per- 
iod, Samuelson said he believed the 
curtailment of releases was being 
done deliberately and that indepen- 
dents were suffering because of it. 
Samuelson, Abram F. Myers, general 
counsel, and Dr. J. B. Fishman con- 
tended that the so-called Allied cara- 
van plan was the closest solution to 
the problem and expressed the hope 
that the project, calling for the ex- 
change of information on terms, 
would become a nation-wide institu- 
tion among the independents. Sam- 
uelson stated that the present long 
runs in theaters were 75 per cent 
artificial and 25 per cent legitimate 
due to more money in the public's 
pocket. 



M of T Radio Fanfare 
For Disney's "Air Power' 



United Artists' Walt Disney pro- 
duction, "Victory Through' Air 
Power," will get a fanfare on the 
March of Time radio program to- 
night over the entire NBC network. 
Disney will be piped in from Holly- 
wood for a discussion on the film. 



by Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge, Repub- 
lican of Massachusetts. Lodge had 
been instrumental in allowing the 
Bureau $50,000 rather than no funds, 
as was nearly decided upon, but he 
strongly opposed increasing the $50,- 
000 fund. O'Mahoney revealed that 
the_ committee had conscientiously 
decided the Government should not 
make pictures at all, leaving the en- 
tire job to the industry. Sen. Ernest 
McFarland, Arizona Democrat, sup- 
ported him, and implied that he 
would like to see the OWI aid to the 
newsreels continued. 

Majority Leader Alben Barkley 
and Minority Leader Charles Mc- 
Nary both supported the O'Mahoney 
amendment — McNary largely be- 
cause of his faith in his fellow Ore- 
gonian and Republican, Palmer Hoyt, 
who took over as head of the domes- 
tic branch last week. 



Thursday, July 1, 1943 



<?ity 



11 



DAILY 



Bargaining Power Over Rentals Unfair -Myers 



Holds Allied's Caravan 
Best Approach to Film 
Rentals, Terms Solution 



(Continued from Page 1) 

.advocating of straight Americanism. 
r_JVIyers indicated that the industry 
Slight be doing a little too much or 
more than the Government requested 
in the war effort. Enthusiasm is 
necessary but it must be properly 
directed, he said. Myers said that 
some of his Congressional friends 
had "ribbed" him because motion 
pictures had stopped their functions 
of entertainment and had become a 
mouthpiece of certain Government 
factions. 

Myers said he reminded those Con- 
gressman that the exhibitors don't 
formulate the policies of the pro- 
ducers. He said the situation would 
be more dangerous to future legisla- 
tion if the industry becomes asso- 
ciated in the minds of Congress and 
the public as an instrument of propa- 
ganda for any particular political 
party. He said Warners' "Mission 
to Moscow" had been characterized 
as partisan political propaganda and 
he pointed to the recent move by in- 
dustry leaders to enter into the 
political fight for appropriations for 
an emergency, referring, presumably, 
to the issue over the maintenance 
of the OWI. 

Declaring that a real danger con- 
fronted the business, Myers said he 
hoped that the motion picture would 
continue to do everything possible 
for the war effort but not to allow 
itself to be catalogued as anything 
but a well-conducted private busi- 
ness and not a political mouthpiece. 

As to the present controversy over 
film rental and terms, Myers said 
that the selling side of the business 
was in the hands of a few, making 
the bargaining power unfair. The 
dream of every independent, he 
said, was to find an inexpensive 
method of curing the so-called evil, 
but that the job was up to the ex- 
hibitors themselves. He believed 
that the Allied caravan plan was the 
best approach to the problem. He 
said the job could be done by nation- 
wide co-operation. Myers recalled 
that by united efforts the exhibi- 
tors agitated fixed admission prices 
by distributors out of the business. 
He said the same could be done to 
combat 50 per cent terms if exhibi- 
tors would show fortitude and refuse 
to play pictures on that basis. 

While many exhibitors are doing 
the biggest business in their careers, 
he warned them that the end of the 
war might be the end of those high 
profits and he advised them that 
while they have the resources they 
should strengthen their organiza- 
tions. 



Sweeney Wounded in Pacific 

Hollis Sweeney, formerly of the 
Poli, Hartford, is in Guadalcanal 
Hospital after being wounded in ac- 
tion. 



The ... . 

FEMME TOUCH 



MARION PARDOLL, cashier, 
Service, New Haven. 



National Screen 



Radio Plugs Paramount's 
"Bell Tolls" and "Dixie" 



Opening gun in the radio campaign 
for the world premiere of Para- 
mount's "For Whom the Bell Tolls" 
at the Rivoli July 14, will be fired 
tonight with participations on three 
major programs. 

Time has been bought on the Ar- 
thur Godfrey program on WABC; 
the Mary Margaret McBride period 
on WEAF, and the Adelaide Hawley 
program on WABC. These will con- 
tinue at least through the film's 
opening. 

Plans are under way for one-min- 
ute transcribed announcements on 
other New York stations, to start 
about 10 days before the premiere. 

Para, is also looking to radio to 
give impetus to pre-release engage- 
ments of "Dixie" in some 20 South- 
ern spots over the coming holiday 
week-end. Pic bows in at the Para- 
mount, Beach and Sheridan, Miami. 
Heaviest radio "gun" will be NBC's 
Kraft Music Hall program tonight, 
with Dorothy Lamour appearing 
with Bing Crosby. Other radio 
plugs will come via a guest appear- 
ance of Crosby on the Chase and 
Sanborn program over CBS on Sun- 
day, a guest appearance of Doro- 
thy Lamour on the Philip Morris 
Playhouse program on July 16, over 
CBS, and the first Bob Crosby-Old 
Gold program on July 9, over NBC. 



Merchants Sponsoring 
Free Summer Movies 



Des Moines, la. — Free movies con- 
tinue to spread again in Iowa with 
the business men of New Hartford 
now deciding to hold Saturday night 
free movies in the street for the 
rest of the Summer. 



Edgerton, O. — Business men here 
are sponsoring free outdoor motion 
picture shows every Wednesday 
night in Village Park for the Sum- 



Berne, Ind. — Local Chamber of 
Commerce has arranged free public 
entertainment each Thursday and 
Saturday evenings weekly during 
the Summer, with outdoor motion 
pictures on Thursday and high 
school band concerts on Saturday. 



Alexander's New Office 

The New York office of the Alex- 
ander Film Co. will move today 
from 630 Ninth Avenue to a new of- 
fice at 42nd St. and Fifth Avenue. 



Toronto Ignores Dominion 
Ban on Civic Holiday 



Toronto — The wartime holiday is- 
sue in Canada gained further empha- 
sis in the action of the City of To- 
ronto in setting aside Monday, Aug. 
2, as Civic Holiday, as in previous 
years although the date is on the 
banned list of the Dominion Govern- 
ment. Other cities in Canada are 
expected to follow Toronto's exam- 
ple. 

A survey also shows that a num- 
ber of cities and towns will observe 
Monday, July 5, as Dominion Day, 
although the Canadian Government 
had switched the official date from 
July 5 to July 1. 



Allied May Re-write 
Its Decree Changes 



{Continued from Page 1) 

quested changes by the independent 
exhibitors. 

How far the Justice Department 
in general and Robert W. Wright in 
particular are being guided by Al- 
lied's proposals for decree change? 
could not .be learned, but it was re- 
ported in some quarters that the 
over-all recommendations could have 
more teeth in them. Individual pro- 
posals, which have appeared to be 
too general, are expected to be re- 
vised in more specific language. 



Film Daily Year Book 
Knows Al l and T ells It 

By GRAYDON HEARTSILL 

Off the presses has rolled the silver anniversary edition of the Film 
Daily Year Book of Motion Pictures to feed the nation's columnists with 
facts and figures for many a week to come. 

For twenty-five years now the volume has appeared, filled to the brim 
with the statistics and listings which make it an invaluable asset to the 
newspaper amusements desk as an inexhaustible source of data and, this 
year, a painstaking record of the forward march — to martial music — of 
the motion picture industry for 1942. 

From Editor Jack Alicoate's compilations in 1,014 pages is gleaned 
the following random harvest: 

The capital invested in the United 
States film industry is estimated at 
$2,061,000,000. The industry employs 
200,000 persons whose estimated 
pay roll totals $325,725,000. 

The average weekly attendance 
in movie houses in 1942 was 90,000,- 
000, as compared to 85,000,000 in 
1941. The figure has only been du- 
plicated once in 1930. 

Story purchases in 1942 by Holly- 
wood studios amounted to $4,975,000. 
The top price paid for a Broadway 
play was $300,000 for "Eve of St. 
Mark," acquired by Twentieth Cen- 
tury-Fox. The same studio paid 
$300,000 for John Steinbeck's "The 
Moon Is Down," top price for a 
novel. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer paid 
the top price for an original story 
when it signed a $60,000 check to 
William Saroyan for his "The Hu- 
man Comedy." 

Since the birth of the film indus- 
try, 45,173 features and short sub- 
jects have been made. Last year 
4,219 rolled through the mill. The 
film footage handled daily by ex- 
changes totals 27,000 miles. The 
average number of prints required 
for each feature is 220, for each 
newsreel is 650. 



Twelve Persons Per Seat 

On Jan. 1, 1943, there were 17,728 
theaters in operation. There is one 
picture theater seat for every twelve 
inhabitants of the United States. 
There is one theater open for every 



8,000 persons. Texas, with 1,322 
theaters, is only topped by New 
York with 1,433. 

The average admission price is 
25.5 cents. The average length fea- 
ture is 80.2 minutes. 

The United States amusement tax 
receipts in 1942 were $146,372,271, 
as compared to $87,819,000 in 1941 
and $3,544,554.70 in 1930. 

A new high mark in the produc- 
tion of features in Technicolor was 
reached in 1942 when twenty-five 
pictures were turned out by seven 
producing companies. 

The year's deaths included Sid- 
ney R. Kent, president of Twen- 
tieth Century-Fox (succeeded by 
Spyros Skouras), John Barrymore, 
Carole Lombard, May Robson, Edna 
May Oliver, James Cruze, Laura 
Hope Crews, George M. Cohan, 
Morris Guest, Joe Jackson, Otis 
Skinner and Buck Jones. The last 
named died as a result of the show 
world's major tragedy, the Boston 
night club holocaust last November. 
Tribute is paid in the "In Memori- 
am" pages to the only Dallas man 
included in the listing — Ed Sulli- 
van, who was manager of the Ma- 
jestic at the time of his death in 
February, 1942. He is credited as 
originator of the military style of 
ushering. 



Reprinted from the 

Times Herald, Dalas, Texas 

May 6, 1943 



12 



rf ~ilL 



TOI 



* DAILY 



Thursday, July 1, 1943 



Warners to Seek Increase in Percentage Deals 



Small Isolated Accounts 
To Be Only Exceptions 
Under Kalmenson Plans 



(.Continued from Page 1) 

today in the Sert Room of the Wal- 
dorf-Astoria. 

Warners already has converted a 
majority of its accounts to a per- 
centage basis, leading all distribu- 
tors in this respect, and the com- 
pany cites long-run records, hefty 
grosses and other data in support 
of the desirability of such a policy. 
Kalmenson's aim it is understood, is 
to put all except small isolated ac- 
counts on the percentage plan. 

With Kalmenson presiding, prin- 
cipal speaker at today's . opening 
session of the sales confab, first in 
the series of three such meetings 
being held this year, will be Joseph 
Bernhard, vice-president. There al- 
so will be talks by Mort Blumen- 
stock, Norman H. Moray, Arthur 
Sachson, Howard Levinson, A. W. 
Schwalberg, Albert Howson and 
others, in addition to Kalmenson. 

Sessions will wind up Saturday, 
and there is a possibility that two 
or three of company's backlog of 
product for next season will be 
screened for the field staff. 

Salesmen attending New York 
sales meeting include: 

New York City— L. Jacobi, G. 
Solomon, Lee Mayer, George Wald- 
man, J. Vergesslich, H. P. Decker, 
I. Rothenberg. 

Albany— George Goldberg, R. S. 
Smith. 

Boston — Sol Edwards, H. G. Se- 
gal, A. Daytz, A. B. Cronin, J. Moore, 
E. Leavitt. 

Buffalo— John A. Strauss, L. As- 
trachan, J. Zurich. 

New Haven — Al Herman. 

Philadelphia— T. N. Noble, B. 
Bache, 0. B. Guilfoil, R. S. Eichen- 
green. 

Washington— Gordon F. Contee, G. 
P. Price, Sterling Wilson, J. A. 
Walker. 

Cincinnati — R. Burns, W. L. Kerr, 
R. Salyer, Max Birnbaum, J. P. 
Eifert. 

Cleveland — Joe Kaliski, E. Catlin, 
Jack Kalmenson. 

Indianapolis — Wm. Wallace, G. J. 
Black, R. S. Sharader. 

Pittsburgh— J. M. Wechsler, N. 
Marcus, H. G. Minsky, Charles L. 
Dortic. 



TO THE COLORS! 



* DECORATED. * 

CPL. ALFRED GOLO, son of Joseph Colo, 
manager, Orient, Scranfon, Pa., awarded 
Soldier's Medal for attempting to save a 
fellow soldier from drowning at Miami 
Beach. 

* COMMISSIONED * 

CAPT. MONROE CREENTHAL, Army Specialists 
Corps. 



* ARMY * 



manager, 



LEONARD BRAVERMAN, assistant 
RKO-Schine Eckel, Syracuse. 

JAMES RODGERS, adsales manager, 20th-Fox 
Cleveland. 

SPENCE PIERCE, 20th-Fox, southwestern ex- 
ploitation representative. 

SAMUEL WEBB, assistant shipper, 20th-Fox, 
Pittsburgh. 



1,000 Attend 20th-Fox 
Family Club Outing 



(Continued from Page 1) 

held its first annual outing here yes- 
terday afternoon. Offices were 
closed at noon and employes arrived 
by boat, with lunch served on board. 

Afternoon was devoted to athletic 
contests for which prizes were do- 
nated by National Theaters, Skouras 
Theaters and company officials. The 
publicity department met home office 
executives in a soft ball game and 
the Broadway office was teamed 
,vith the home office advertis- 
ing department, while on another 
diamond the girls of the contract and 
accounting departments vied for the 
women's championship. 

Lew Lehr of Movietonews was 
chairman of the entertainment com- 
mittee and the chairmen of the 
athletic events were: men's soft 
ball, Mike Navias and Ed Wyant; 
women's soft ball, Elsie Collins and 
Eleanor Coney; swimming Doris 
Adelman; tennis, Lee Dratta; quoits 
and horse-shoes, Jack Gordon; box- 
ing, William Attadino; handball, 
Sam Shapiro; singers and dancers, 
Vic Lourie; gin rummy contest, 
George Droulia. Dinner was served 
in Bear Mountain Inn and on the 
return trip to New York, music for 
dancing was supplied by a well 
known dance band. 



Peak Employment Hits 
Walnut Beach Attendance 



Walnut Beach, Conn. — The Tower 
which opened every Summer in ad- 
dition to the Colonial here, will be 
closed this year. The Colonial re- 
mains on regular schedule, with four 
matinees weekly. Exhibitor Albert 
Smith reports the working popula- 
tion is now year-round at this beach 
resort, but too much employment 
hits theater attendance. 



Late advices from Dave Bader, 
20th-Fox's "Bear Mountain corre- 
spondent" for the day, brought the 
news that the baseball game be- 
tween company executives and the 
publicity department was won by 
Hal Home's scriveners by a score 
of 15 to 12. It was described as a 
"swell game". Egg and potato 
races, and soft ball game by the girls 
helped to round out a full day of 
pleasurable activity amid perfect 
weather. 



Cleveland Allied Men 
Hear Report on Caravan 



Cleveland — Local Allied members 
met yesterday at the Statler Hotel, 
to hear details of discussions held 
here last week by the National Cara- 
van. It is understood UA's selling 
policy of "Stage Door Canteen" was 
also discussed. 



Congressional Library 
Requests 104 Films 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Library of Congress 
has requested distributors to de- 
posit with it 104 films and portions 
of films, released between May 1, 
1942 and April 30, 1943, under an 
agreement between the Library and 
the film companies made in April, 
1942. Temporary storage and screen 
facilities are supplied by the Mu- 
seum of Modern Art Film Library 
as the result of a three-year grant 
of the Rockefeller Foundation made 
last year. 



NEK Com. to Map 
Council Meet Plans 



Organization of the National En- 
tertainment Industry Council in 3jr~ 
amusement world's determination! 
go all-out in the nation's war efre.t, 
will move a step closer to completion 
tonight at a meeting of the group's 
continuation committee at the Hotel 
Astor. Plans for the initial meeting 
of the council, to be held at the 
Waldorf-Astoria on July 14 and 15, 
will be mapped by representatives 
of every branch of the entertainment 
business. 

The committee members also will 
consider recommendations to be 
placed before the council, which will 
be dedicated to complete mobiliza- 
tion of the show world in victorious 
prosecution of the war. 

Yovan Subs in Wilmington 

Harrisburg, Pa. — Zeva Yovan, as- 
sistant manager at Loew's here is 
at present acting as assistant for 
Loew's Wilmington, Del. During 
Yovan's absence, Pat Walker is fill- 
ing his job. 



tmmifmmitmi' 



imtSlZZ' 




3 A N 
X 5 H It?"* N\ <)Z 

-) N I V CI cl d ^ 



In Today's Issue, 



The Equipment News Section 

DO NOT R£MOV£, 



Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 





The Daily Newspaper 
Oi Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



84, NO. 2 



NEW YORK, FRIDAY, JULY 2, 1943 



TEN CENTS 



"BUYING^ CLINICS" JM ALLIED IN EAST 

Warners' Open Door Policy to Stand — Bernhard 



Is "Workable, Equitable/' 
Says Bernhard; Sees 
Post-War Attendance Gain 



Continuance of Warners' "open 
door" policy in the company's busi- 
ness relations with them was prom- 
i s e d exhibitors 
"in the most em- 
phatic terms" 
yesterday by Jos- 
eph Bernhard, 
vice-president of 
the firm. 

Speaking at the 
Waldorf - Astoria 
at the opening 
session of the 
first of three reg- 
ional meetings to 
be held this year 
by the company, 
Bernhard said 
that Warners- 
policy of co-op- 
eration would be 
continued because it had been found 

(Continued on Page 4) 




JOSEPH BERNHARD 



50% of PRC Program 
Finished by October 



Declaring that "We have no limi- 
tations on budget, we have the 'go- 
sign' from our financial backers," 
A.rthur Green'blatt, sales chief of 
PRC, yesterday told delegates to the 

(.Continued on Page 4) 



New Jersey Allied Told 
Of Industry's War Effort 

West End, N. J. — Full impact of 
vhat the industry is doing and has 
lone in the war effort was brought 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Crawford to Warners 
Under a Long Termer 

West Coast Bui:, THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Warners has signed 
Joan Crawford, long under con- 
tract to Me,tro, to an exclusive long- 
term contract. Her first film for the 
company will be "Night Shift." 




"But the glory of the Present is to make the Future free — 
We love our land for what she is and what she is to be." 



40 Pix for Recaptured Lands 

OWI to Direct Distribution, Exhibition 



Recommended That NEIC 
Act as an Advisory Body 

That the National Entertainment 
Industry Council act as an advisory 
and consultative body at a minimum 
of expense and formality was the 
principal recommendation made last 
night by the continuation commit- 
tee at its regular Thursday night 
session. It also recommended that 
any organization be allowed to re- 
sign at any time, and that a co-ordi- 
nating committee be named to carry 
on the work of the Council between 
meetings. 

Thirty-three bodies in the amuse- 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Superimposed title and some dub- 
bed versions of 40 American films 
' will be handled in countries recap- 
■ tured from the Axis by the Over- 
i seas Bureau of the OWI, it was 
decided yesterday at a meeting of 
foreign managers and OWI repre- 
sentatives at the MPPDA offices, 
i OWI will rush the films to strategic 
points for quick showing on the 
heels of the occupying military 
| forces, in addition to administering 
j booking and exhibition until normal 
• commercial channels are open. Some 
trade quarters had held out for com- 
ipany distribution. 

If more than 40 features are found 
(Continued on Page 6) 



Regional and Local Meet- 
ings Planned; Ask Scouts 
Aid to Combat Vandalism 



By AL STEEN 
Associate Editor, THE FILM DAILY 

West End, N. J. — Plans to create 
'buying clinics' among the Eastern 
units of Allied were completed at 
the Eastern Regional Conference 
held here yesterday in conjunction 
with the annual meeting of New 
Jersey Allied. 

Clinics will be conducted by se- 
lected exhibitors who are considered 
the most competent film buyers in 
each region. These men will give 
advice on buying and tell the others 

(Continued on Page 6) 



BIR Will Approve 
Certain Pay Increases 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Pay increases will be 
approved for salaried employes by 
the Bureau of Internal Revenue, it 
was announced yesterday, if em- 

(Continued on Page 6) 



$811,499 More Cut from 
OWI's Domestic Branch 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — There was a slim 
possibility last night that the OWI 
motion picture bureau might have 
more than $50,000 with which to 

(Continued on Page 4) 



"Great John L" 

Angeled by Crosby 

West Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Bing Crosby, Frank 
Mastroly and James Edward Grant 
will produce "The Great John L," 
based on the life of John L. Sullivan. 
Grant, who wrote the original, is ex- 
pected to complete the screenplay 
in two weeks, but actual production 
will not start from four to six months. 
The picture will be a million dollar 
production, with Crosby its chief 
backer. Permission to picturize Sul- 
livan's life was received from the 
executor of his estate, but pic will 
not be a fight story. 






^ 



DAILY 



Friday, July 2, 1942 




Vol. 84, No. 2 Fri., July 2, 1943 


10 Cents 


JOHN W. ALICOATE : : 


Publisher 


DONALD M. MERSEREAU : General 


Manager 



CHESTER B. BAHN :::::: Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address- 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Kalph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIUES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco-Auielio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



New Investment Banking 
Co. In Mexican Pix Field 



Chicago — Charles F. Glore, part- 
ner of Glore, Forgan & Co., an- 
naunced yesterday that an interna- 
tional investment banking firm, to 
be known as Impulsora Commercial 
Y. Industrial S.A. has been organ- 
ized by American and Mexican in- 
terests with a capital of $1,000,000 
to invest in Mexican enterprises, in- 
cluding films. The firm has already 
acquired the business of Kalb, Moran 
& Co. of Mexico City. Arthur Chil- 
gren, well known Chicago attorney, 
is a director of the company. 



Its the quickest 
road to post- 
war equipment 

NATIONAL 

THEATRE SUPPLY'S 




Schine Ilion Theater 
Withdraws Complaint 



Clearance complaint filed with the 
Albany arbitration tribunal in Jan- 
uary by Schine Ilion Corp., opera- 
tor of the Capitol Theater, Ilion, 
N. Y., has been withdrawn. Demand 
asked reduction of clearance granted 
the Stanley, Avon and Olympic The- 
aters, Utica, be reduced, and named 
Loew's, Paramount, 20th-Fox and 
RKO. 



Rhine Hook Theaters 
Appeals Two Awards 

Two appeals of awards granted by 
the New York tribunal have been 
filed by Rhine Hook Theaters, Inc. 
One involves the Lyceum Theater, 
Red Hook, N. J. in a clearance com- 
plaint against Loew's, RKO, 20th- 
Fox and Vitagraph while the other 
concerns the Star Theater, Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y. Arbitrator granted 
partial relief in both complaints 
which were heard concurrently but 
Rhine Hook asks further clearance 
reductions. 



"Inflation" Withdrawal 
Said Asked by Treasury- 



Metro's decision yesterday to with- 
draw its special short, "Inflation" 
was in response to the request of 
the U. S. Treasury, it was reported. 
Treasury officials feared that the 
picture might cause over-buying. 
The OWI did not agree, and was will- 
ing to have the picture released. 

Part of the "America Speaks" ser- 
ies, "Inflation," starring Edward 
Arnold as Satan, showed overbuying, 
rising prices, etc.? as causes of in- 
flation, portraying them with sar- 
casm, then devoted some footage to 
showing the chaotic condition result- 
ing from inflation. The Treasury 
apparently did not believe that the 
sarcasm was sufficiently strong to 
keep Americans from rushing out to 
buy everything in sight. 

The short is said to have cost 
Metro $50,000 which probably will 
be a total loss. 



Reject "Russian Story' 
For Showing in Ohio 



The Ohio censor board in Cleve- 
land has rejected "The Russian 
Story" for exhibition in Ohio unless 
the scenes covering the battleship 
Potemkin are eliminated, Joseph 
Burstyn, who produced the film for 
Artkino release, stated last night. 

It would be impossible to show 
the picture with the Potemkin scenes 
eliminated, Burstyn said, therefore it 
will not be exhibited in Ohio. 



Skouras on National 
War Fund Committee 



■Spyros P. Skouras, president of 
20th-Fox, will be on the executive 
committee of the New York Com- 
mittee of the National War Fund, 
a joint national appeal of 16 agen- 
cies for $1.25,000,000. 



Cleveland Exhibs Suggest 
UA Serve 'Canteen' Gratis 



Cleveland, O. — Local exhibitor dis- 
satisfaction with the terms asked by 
UA for "Stage Door Canteen" cli- 
maxed at a meeting here yesterday 
when the theater operators sent a 
wire to Grad Sears, UA vice-prexy, 
which read: 

"United Artists in selling "Stage 
Door Canteen' have dwelt on patriotic 
obligation of exhibitors to show this 
picture on 50 per cent basis. At a 
meeting held in Cleveland today, 
exhibitors as a patriotic gesture 
agreed to donate all of their re- 
ceipts to their local USO in the 
name of exhibitors and United Ar- 
tists if you will serve picture gratis." 



May Continue OWI H'wood 
Bureau at Industry's Cost 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Nelson Poynter, Hol- 
lywood head of OWI's motion pic- 
ture bureau, believes the bureau will 
be continued despite any budget cuts 
made by Congress and that he un- 
derstood the film industry has made 
an offer in the East to defray costs 
of operating the bureau. 

He asserted the cost of operating 
the Hollywood office was only $50,000 
and that he would be willing to 
have the status of a $l-a-year man 
if necessary. Poynter's annual cost 
of maintaining both Washington 
and Coast liaison bureaus could be 
continued for approximately $100,- 
000. Poynter said largest share of 
$1,300,000 budget was for raw film 
for 26 shorts, plus production costs. 



Columbia Will Release 
O'Brien's "Pile Buck" 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — A deal was set be- 
tween Columbia and Terneen Corp. 
which consists of Pat O'Brien and 
Phil L. Ryan for the production of 
"Pile Buck" to star O'Brien. This 
story by John and Ward Hawkins 
about a war-time shipyard worker 
which ran in the Saturday Evening 
Post under title of "Saboteur" will 
go into production at Columbia later 
in the year under the producership 
of Ryan. 



Kay Joins Warners as 
Eastern Story Editor 



Ellingwood Kay, former associate 
editor of Cosmopolitan Magazine, 
will join Warners as Eastern story 
editor on July 12, succeeding Helen 
Herman, who left the company last 
week to become a bride. 



Permanent Recordings Ban 
Is Ordered by Petrillo 

At a brief meeting yesterday af- 
ternoon sponsored by the Govern- 
ment to mediate in the AFM ban on 
recordings, James C. Petrillo, AFM 
prexy, stated that he had ordered 
the ban on transcriptions made per- 
manent. 



COmmC and come 



CHARLES EINFELD plans to leave Burbank 
for New York next Wednesday. 

DR. HERBERT T. KALMUS, president and gen- 
eral manager of Technicolor, accompanied by 
KAY HARRISON, managing director of Techni- 
color, Ltd., and DONALD SMITH, have left 
Hollywood on a business trip to New York. 



i 



the 
to 



MATTHEW FOX is scheduled to leave 
Coast today for New York, prelimb*! 
reporting for Army Service. fio 

ED GARDNER, the "Archie" of the "radio 
program "Duffy's Tavern," left New York for 
Hollywood where he will star in the Skirball- 
Spitz screen version of "Duffy's Tavern" which 
Jack Moss will produce for UA release. 

STEVE EDWARDS of Republic's home office 
publicity department leaves Monday, for Chi- 
cago, for promotion in connection with Roy 
Rogers Month there. 

OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN II and RICK RODGERS 
leave for the Coast July 7 to report to 20th- 
Fox. 

DICK MURRAY of the Paramount short sub- 
jects department leaves today for California. 

MURPHY McHENRY, Paramount studio publi- 
cist, leaves for the East on Tuesday. 

TEX RITTER opens a Southern p. a. tour in 
Spartansburg, S. C. Wednesday. 

JOSEPH R. VOGEL is on a tour of New 
England Loew stands. 

ABE BURROWS, MAC BENOFF and PARKE 
LEVY, writers of the radio program, "Duffy's 
Tavern," leave Monday, for Hollywood. 

GEORGE B. WEST, Monogram St. Louis 
franchise holder, has left the Coast for home. 

HERMAN RIFKIN, New England Monogram 
franchise holder, is en route East from Holly- 
wood. 

HUNT STROM BERG departs for the Coast 
today. 

WARNER BAXTER starts a USO-Camp Shows 

tour of four California Army bases at Fresno 

on July 9. His final appearance will be at 
Minster Field, Bakersfield, July 16. 

CHARLES LAUGHTON begins a voluntary tour 
of Army camps in the Northwest at the Army 
air base at Portland, Ore., tomorrow. The 
tour will end on July 12 at the Seattle port of 
embarkation. 

PETE PANAGOS, booking director of the 
Alliance circuit, is back in Chicago after at- 
tending booking huddles in Indianapolis. 



FINANCIAL 



(.Thursday, July 1) 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 



High Low Close 

Am. Seat 16 16 16 

Col. Picts. vtc. (2i/ 2 %) 1834 1834 1834 + 

Columbia Picts. pfd 

Con. Fm. Ind 234 234 234—' 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd... 17% 17% 17% — 

East. Kodak 1653/ 4 165i/ 2 165% — 

do pfd 



Net 
Chg. 



A 

'A 
% 

A 



22% + % 

61% + 3/ 8 

273/ 4 _ i/ 8 

9 

94 — % 

21 % — % 

32% — % 



14% 



Gen. Prec. Eq 23 % 2234 

Loew's, Inc 61% 61 

Paramount 28Vi 2734 

RKO 9% 9 

RKO $6 pfd 94 94 

20th Century-Fox ... 213/ 8 21 % 
20th Century-Fox pfd.323/ 8 32% 

Univ. Pict. pfd 

Warner Bros 14% 14% 

do pfd 88% 88y 4 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 
Para. B'way 3s55 . . 77% 77% 77% — % 

Para. Picts. deb. 4s56 

Warner Bros.' dbs. 6s48 

1005/ 8 100 19-32 100 19-32 — 13-32 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Monogram Picts 3% 

Radio-Keith cvs. ... 1 7/ 8 

Sonotone Corp 314 

Technicolor 12% 

Trans-Lux 334 

Universal Corp. vtc 

Universal Picts 19 



33/ 8 

13/4 
3% 
121/2 
334 



+ % 



3% — % 

1% + % 

3% — % 

12% + % 

33/ 4 . 



1834 1834 + % 




You 




/ 



tytee is having a 
meeting < 

So ok +ke boyj ouM 

be back . G-ef fe*^ 
ok the ptawte -f«3st* 

&\nM qc"t" e*i Ouey 
*f~o see yot». The/ If 

but/nett to fafK 
3feo*t,, 



/«» 7** #^i? S7XW Drivel 



Friday, July 2, 1942 



50% of PRC Program 
Finished by October 



(Continued f_rom Page 1) 

company's regional sales meeting 
that the lowest budget picture on the 
1943-44 program would equal the 
highest cost of any of last season's 
films. He noted that 50 per cent of 
the new program will be ready by 
October. 

Greenblatt stressed the already 
announced policy that PEC will veer 
away from war pictures and will 
base the major part of its new pro- 
gram on headline topical subjects, 
with at least half of the program 
in the lighter vein. In clarifying 
the sales policy on new product, 
Greenblatt told delegates details of 
the special campaign under way for 
"Isle of Forgotten Sins," to be re- 
leased Aug. 15. 

0. Henry Briggs, president of 
PRC, opened the Park Central Hotel 
session with a review of the com- 
pany's growth and a prediction of 
further expansion in the future. He 
declared that closer co-ordination 
between production and sales staffs, 
designed to anticipate exhibitor 
needs, had determined the character 
and diversity of the new lineup. 
Harry Brandt, president of the 
ITOA, was a guest speaker. To- 
day's session features a luncheon 
for the trade press. 

Delegates at the meeting- include: Briggs, 
John S. Young, Greenblatt, Karl Herzog-, 
Fred Rohrs, Armand Schenek, Joseph O'Sul- 
livan. S. S. Kestenbaum, Joseph H. Lamm, 
Roberto D. Socas, Harold Flavin and John 
Miehelson, all from the home office. 

Also. Bernard Mills, Jack Berkson, Leo 
Murphy, Albany-Buffalo: Harry Goldman, 
Max Farber, Max Salzberg-, Sam Levine, 
Boston; Nat Lefton, Jack Lefton. Nat Kaplan, 
Manny Weiss, Rudy Norton,, Fred Seheur- 
man. Sam Weiss, M. Higgins, Cleveland-Cin- 
cinnati: William Flemion, Bert Foster, Rob- 
ert Buermele, William Clark, Robert Snyder, 
Detroit; Lt. Com. Bert Kulick, Sidney Ku- 
lick, Frances Kulick, New York: Herb Given, 
Harry Sanger, Philadelphia; Lew Lefton, 
Milton Lefton. Jack Withers, Godfrey Lef- 
ton, Pittsburgh: Harry Gibbs, New Haven; 
George Gill, Bill Smith, Barry Goldman, 
Danny Rosenthal, Washington. 




July 2 
George Folsey Joan Irene Perrin 

July 3 

Leon Errol Al Perrin 

Wynne Gibson Luther Reid 

Fred Rassman Florence Miles Alicoate 

July 4 

Louis B. Mayer 

Gertrude Lawrence 

Mrs. Thomas Meighan 

Mary Patricia Alicoate 

Gloria Stuart 

Vince Barnett 

Barbara Weeks 

Joseph Ruttenberg 

July 5 

Helen Harrison 



Warners Keeps Door Open 

Policy Found Workable, Sales Meet Told 



George Murphy 
Joe C. Hornstein 
Ed Savin 
Harvey Thew 
Henry Armetta 
Irving Caesar 
Helen Gilbert 
Henri Elman 



(Continued ft 

to be both "workable and equitable." 
"We welcome any of our custom- 
ers to call to our attention their in- 
dividual difficulties," he asserted, 
"and we assure them that they will 
be met with an open door and an 
open mind, particularly in situations 
affected by population shifts due to 
war conditions." 

Bernhard told the sales represen- 
tatives that by and large the wartime 
population shifts had affected only 
a small percentage of the theater- 
going public, perhaps not more than 
three per cent of the country as a 
whole. It was his prediction that 
the increase in theater attendance 
would continue after the war because 
of the stronger establishment of the 
theater-going habit, the larger num- 
ber of potential patrons, greater 
frequency of attendance and progres- 
sive improvement in the quality of 
film product. He also pointed out 
that the industry's co-operation in 
making screen entertainment avail- 
able for the armed forces was de- 



em Page 1) 

veloping a large number of new and 

permanent picture fans. 

Messages congratulating the work of the 
sales force were received from Jack L. 
Warner, H. M. Warner and Major Albert 
Warner. The first-named praised the co- 
operation and teamwork of the field organi- 
zation -under Ben Kalmenson, general "sales 
manager, and called the present "sales force 
the most efficient in the company's history. 

Charles Einfeld, vice-president in charge 
of advertising and publicity, who was un- 
able to attend the New York meeting, wired 
that "the sky's the limit" as far as the ex- 
ploitation and merchandising of next sea- 
son's product is concerned. 

Presiding was Kalmenson, who will serve 
in a similar capacity at the Chicago and 
San Francisco regional. On the dais with 
him and Bernhard were Samuel Schneider, 
More Blumenstock, Norman H. Moray, Ar- 
thur Sachson, Roy Haines, A. W. Schwalberg, 
Jules Lapidus, Howard Levinson, Albert 
Howson. 

Affiliation of Bert M. Stearn with the 
Warner sales organization was announced 
at the meeting by Kalmenson. Stearn will 
serve in a general utility capacity for the 
time being, it was said. 

Group conferences conducted by Kalmen- 
son, Sachson, Lapidus, Levinson, Schwalberg, 
Moray and other sales department heads 
were held in the afternoon. 

The day closed with screenings of "Thank 
Your Lucky Stars" and "Watch on the 
Rhine." 

The meeting closes tomorrow. 



$811,499 More Cut from 
OWI's Domestic Branch 



(Continued from Page 1) 

function during the next year, but 
it was a very slim chance indeed. 

House and Senate conferees agreed 
late last night to slash the funds of 
the OWI domestic branch further, 
cutting $811,499 from the $3,561,499 
voted Wednesday by the Senate and 
leaving only half the $5,500,000 orig- 
inally recommended by the House 
appropriations committee. The $2,- 
750,000 finally agreed upon, and due 
to be voted upon today by both 
chambers, is less than one-third the 
amount originally asked for the 
agency. 

Two weeks ago, when it appeared that 
the domestic branch might be voted $5,500,- 
000 by the House, Director Elmer Davis im- 
plied to a press conference that he would 
find it necessary to cut the motion picture 
bureau to a skeleton. Certainly he will not 
be more lenient with half the funds. 

The conference report does not specify 
the use to which the funds for the domestic 
branch must be put, eliminating the ear- 
marking- in the Senate bill. It does however, 
call for more work to be done by the agency 
with the smaller appropriation. The book 
and magazine section was restored. Although 
the other sections knocked out by the Sen- 
ale are still out. 

While no final action on the War Agen- 
cies appropriations bill was taken yesterday, 
the end of the OWI motion picture bureau 
as an effective agency is not questioned seri- 
ously in OWI sources. Only Lowell Mellett, 
its director, was at all hopeful and even 
he admitted that his hope was mainly that 
something effective could be worked out by 
OWI. It is no longer possible to raise the 
funds provided by Congress for his bureau. 

Mellett parried all questions concerning 
bis future plans, saying he might be able to 
say something today. He indicated that it 
was not unlikely he would retain direction of 
what is left of the bureau, but would not 
be quoted on anything. 



Rites for Carl Duncan 

Killbuck, O. — Funeral services for 
Carl Duncan, 60, operator of the 
Duncan theater, were held here yes- 
terday. Survivors include his wife 
and a son, William, in the Army. 



New Jersey Allied Told 
Of Industry's War Effort 

(Continued from Page 1) 

home tto exhibitors yesterday through 
addresses by industry leaders at the 
closing session of the New Jersey 
Allied annual "showman-at-war" 
conference. 

Francis S. Harmon, Arthur Mayer, 
Irving Dollinger, Don Jacocks and 
others described what had been done 
and what was still to be done. 

Arthur Mayer declared that an 
undescribable confusion would have 
resulted had it , not been for the 
War Activities Committee and the 
office of Lowell Mellett in handling 
the multiple details in connection 
with films, Bond drives and kindred 
activities. 

Mayer said that despite the apparent 
death of the OWI film bureau, there was 
every reason to believe that one informa- 
tional short would be released by the Gov- 
ernment every week. He added that there 
would be only two drives launched this 
year — one for the Red Cross and one for 
the National War Relief. He stressed the 
importance of copper collections, pointing 
out that there was a definite shortage, and 
declared that the Government was looking 
to the theaters for a major portion of the 
collections. 

Harmon, in praising the decentralization 
of WAC, said that the theaters in the New 
York and Philadelphia areas had paid their 
shares of the WAC budget in full. The 
problems of releasing and getting the proper 
distribution of Government and patriotic 
shorts were described effectively. 

Dollinger announced that plans were well 
along for Allied's own Bond drive to raise 
among its theaters' patrons enough money to 
buy a squadron of bombers. He said that 
the first day of the drive, which starts in 
August, would be promoted with the idea 
of Allied members themselves buying enough 
Bonds to purchase a bomber which is to be 
named the Allied. 

H. M. Richey discussed the film transpor- 
tation problem and urged patience and co- 
operation in the gasoline emergency. 

Other speakers included Andy Smith, who 
outlined the future big productions exhibi- 
tors could expect from 20th Century -Fox; 
Don Jacocks of Warner Theaters: Max Gil- 
lis of Republic; Ed Morey of Monogram; 



Sales Drive Winners 
Named by Kalmenson 

Winners in Warners' 1943 Drive 
'of Champions, described by Ben Kal- 
menson, general sales manager, as 
the most successful campaign of its 
kind ever conducted by the company, 
were announced by Kalmens^ / at 
yesterday's opening session c.^% ne 
regional sales meeting in the Wal- 
dorf-Astoria. Recipients of the $33,- 
500 in War Bonds which will be dis- 
tributed as prizes include: 

DISTRICT MANAGERS: First Prize. 
Henry Herbel, West Coast, $1,500; Second. 
Ralph L. McCoy. Southern, $1,000; Third. 
Hall Walsh, Prairie. $750: Fourth. Harry 
Seed, Central at start of drive, recently 
promoted to N. Y. Metropolitan, $500: Fifth. 
Robert Smeltzer, Mid-Atlantic, $350. 

BRANCHES: First Prize, Kansas City. 
Russell C, Borg, manager, $3,500: Second. 
Seattle, Vete Stewart, $3,000; Third. San 
Francisco, Al Shmitken, $2,500: Fourth, 
Denver, Earl A. Bell. $2,000; Fifth, Los 
Angeles, Fred Greenberg, $1,750; Sixth. 
Memphis, H. G. Krumm, $1,500; Seventh, 
Portland, Al Oxtoby, $1,250; Eighth, Salt 
Lake City. William F. Gordon, $1,000; 
Ninth, New Orleans, Luke Conner, $900: 
Tenth, Dallas, Roak Roberts, $800; Eleventh. 
Washington, Fred W. Beiersdorf, $750; 
Twelfth, Buffalo, Max Roth, $700; Thir- 
teenth, Oklahoma City. J. W. Loewe, $600; 
Fourteenth, Atlanta, W. O. Williamson Jr. 
(how in Navy), $550; Fifteenth, Chicago. 

A. J. Shumow, $500. 

SALESMEN: First Prize, Ed Williamson, 
Atlanta (recently promoted to Memphis 
branch manager as a result), $350; Second, 
W. B. Collins, Detroit, $325: Third. Gordon 
F. Contee, Washington, $300; Fourth, J. H. 
Jordon, Charlotte, $250; Fifth, H. G. Min- 
sky, Pittsburgh, $200; Sixth, Lloyd E. 
James, San Francisco, $150; Seventh, J. D. 
Jernigan, New Orleans. $125; Eighth, El- 
mer Huhnke, Omaha, $100 Ninth, R. Salyer, 
Cincinnati, $100; Tenth. H. Keeter. Char- 
lotte. $100. 

BOOKERS: First Prize. San Francisco, 
$600; Second, Memphis, $500: Third, Den- 
ver, $400; Fourth. Charlotte, $350: Fifth, 
Chicago, $300; Sixth, Dallas, $200; Seventh. 
Philadelphia, $150: Eighth, Kansas City, 
$125; Ninth, Seattle, $100; Tenth, Indian- 
apolis, $100. 

AD SALESMEN: First Prize. C. M. No- 
rene, Omaha. $200; Second, E. Mallicoat, 
Kansas City, $175: Third, M. L. Davis. Mem- 
phis, $150; Fourth, G. Seibert. Buffalo. 
$125; Fifth, L. Shayne, Chicago. $100: 
Sixth, H. E. Stirling, St. John, $100: Seventh. 

B. Davis, Dallas, $75; Eighth, L. Katz, 
Vancouver, $75; Ninth, A. Blase, Philadel- 
phia, $75; Tenth, C. Stacey, Cincinnati. $50. 



and George Dembow of National Screen Ser- 
vice who, because of the great amount of 
war work his company is doing, urged ex- 
hibitors to be tolerant if trailers and ac- 
cessories were late. 

The conference closed without resolutions 
or and expression of grievances. 

Harmon was the principal speaker at the 
banquet last night which climaxed the three- 
day sessions. Harmon's theme embraced unity 
as an industry and as a nation, declaring 
that without the proper doctrines and prin- 
ciples of progress, individuality and funda- 
mental moral laws we cannot expect security 
when peace comes. 



IN NEW POSTS 



WILLIAM P. HENEY, assistant to Bob 

Dougherty, Florida State Theaters general 

manager, Daytona Beach, Fla. 
EARL HOLDEN, manager, Imperial, Charlotte. 
WILLIAM CANAUCHTON, assistant manager, 

Capitol, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
JOSEI"H TINSLEY, assistant manager, Penn, 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
|AY FRANK, 20th-Fox pulicity, Milwaukee and 

Detroit. 



ELLINGWOOD KAY, 
Warner Bros. 



Eastern story editor, 



tHE FIRSt Of tHE 



^/^.SUWMERH" S! 



THE 

BOX OFNCt 

KlHGS 

M 1Ht\R 

BEST I 






PA - L LONG -«- "!'«?«»» *«* 






SS 



IOHNNV t«r;^ £w»tUAMS 

50 ~ "\Tf,ed«rfc RtooWo -- ■ produced by « 

Directed D ' v 



***» «* 



7^f/>' 



ow 



DEANNA JOSEPH 

DURBIN - COTTEN 

HERS TO HOLD 

HOWARD HAWK'S 

CORVETTE K-225 




JOIN THE "SHANGRI-LA" WAR STAMP DRIVE DURING JULY^ 



fjffft"* 

* DAILY 



Friday, July 2, 1942 



"Buying Clinics" 
For Allied in East 



(Continued from Page 1) 

whether they have made good deals 
or not and make suggestions. 

Eastern Regional leaders will 
meet every 60 days on clinic matters 
and, in addition, there will be local 
parleys. 

As a means of combatting van- 
dalism, a suggestion was made at 
the Regional Conference to appeal to 
the Boy Scouts of America for help. 
Because the average Boy Scout is 
well trained in behavior and proper 
conduct, it is believed that the use 
of the Scouts in curbing hoodlum- 
ism will be effective. The Scouts 
will be informed that they will not 
be "squealing" on an acquaintance if 
they catch one in an act of vandalism, 
inasmuch as the destruction of ma- 
terials today in reality is equal to 
sabotage and they will be helping 
to combat sabotage if they will co- 
operate. 

Irving Dollinger, Eastern Region- 
al vice-president, said that he al- 
ready has used Boy Scouts in the 
work and has found it effective. 
Col. H. A. Cole also has found the 
plan successful in Texas, it was said. 

Both the plans for "buying clinics" 
and the use of Boy Scouts will be 
proposed to all Allied units and may 
be adopted on a national basis when 
the National Board meets in Bal- 
timore next month. 



IATSE Warns of Fire Risk 
Thru Inexperienced Help 



Prompted by the alarming in- 
crease in theater fires, the IATSE 
has issued a stern warning against 
the use of inexperienced help in the- 
ater jobs involving an element of 
risk, such as projectionists and cus- 
todians of stage properties. 

The alliance declared in the latest 
issue of its official bulletin that as 
result of the shift of trained man- 
power occasioned by the war "we 
should take every conceivable pre- 
caution to protect public life and 
property," adding that "at the same 
time by maintaining the operations 
of theater plants for the duration we 
will not jeopardize our present or 
future livelihood." 



Cole Gets Extra Gas 
For Caravan Meets 

Dallas — Extra gas has been al- 
lowed by the Dallas Gas Rationing 
Board to Col. H. A. Cole for his 
trip over the state to fill Allied 
Caravan dates, because of the WAC 
work also accomplished at these 
meetings. Additional dates on the 
Caravan itinerary are, San Antonio, 
July 6 and Houston, July 8, with 
a final meeting at Dallas after Cole's 
return. 



TO THE COLORS! 



* DECORATED * 

GEORGE KOHLER, USA, formerly, Bausch & 
Lom Optical Co., Rochester, N. Y., awarded 
the Purple Heart. 

* COMMISSIONED * 

IRVING TOMBACK, USA, formerly, World Play- 
house, Chicago, commissioned a lieutenant. 

* TO OFFICERS~SCHOOLS * 

BERNARD TEITEL, son of Abe Teitel, Chicago 
theater owner. 

* ARMY * 

ROY DEWANNER STALLINCS, manager, Im- 
perial, Charlotte. 
GEORGE ROSE, M-G-M, Chicago. 
MAX FACTOR, Universal, Chicago. 



HAROLD VAN RIEL, 20th-Fox home office art 

department. 
STANLEY BALCKBURN, manager, Paramount, 

Omaha. 

* NAVY * 

JOSEPH BYRNES, Granada, Olyphant, Pa. 
JOSEPH DEVINE,, Comerford, Scranton, Pa. 

— • — 

* MERCHANT MARINE * 

CHRIS CHIN, assistant cashier, 20th-Fox, Chi- 
cago. 

— • — 

* ACTIVATED * 

LT. COM. NORTON RITCHEY, USN, vice- 
president in charge of foreign distribution, 
Monogram Pictures. 



40 Pix tor Recaptured Lands 

OWI to Direct Distribution, Exhibition 



(Continued from Page 1) 



necessary, the number will be in- 
creased, it is understood. For the 
present, however, the total stands 
at 40. Titles of pix and languages 
to be employed in the versions are 
restricted until the United Nations 
strike. 

Sitting in for the Government at 
yesterday's huddle were Robert Ris- 
kin, who heads the film bureau of 
OWI's overseas division; Charles 
Goldsmith, formerly with Metro, and 
Harry Kosiner, formerly with UA. 

A backlog of features with titles 
superimposed in appropriate langu- 
ages has been built up during the 
past several months. In addition, 
several companies, including War- 
ners, M-G-M and Universal have 
been lining up departments to dub 
the actual languages into their sound 



tracks. OWI is leaving choice as to 
dubbing or use of titles up to the 
individual companies. 

Warners is said to have French 
dubbed versions of its best pictures 
for use in North Africa and against 
the time when French speaking coun- 
tries will be liberated. Company is 
also said to have Italian versions 
under consideration at its Coast stu- 
dio. M-G-M has placed Robert Eis- 
ner in charge of its French depart- 
ment while Harold Sugarman has 
charge of synchronization at the Uni- 
versal plant. Twentieth-Fox is re- 
ported planning French versions in 
England. 

Foreign managers at yesterday's 
meeting also discussed the Austra- 
lian situation and mapped moves to 
be made in an effort to secure funds 
still blocked there. 



Appeals Court Upholds 
Conviction of Hirsch 



The U. S. Circuit Court of Ap- 
peals yesterday upheld the con- 
viction of Martin A. Hirsch, former 
Treasury Department auditor who 
was sentenced to two years' im- 
prisonment and fined $2,000 on a 
charge of perjuring himself before 
the special Federal grand jury prob- 
ing alleged racketeering in the film 
industry. 

Hirsch was named as having 
posted $25,000 bail for Nick Circella, 
alias Nick Dean, Chicago labor 
racketeer now serving eight years 
for aiding George E. Browne and 
William Bioff in the shakedown of 
film companies. 

Isidore Zevin, former bookkeeper 
for Browne who was indicted for 
perjury in the racketeering probe, 
yesterday had his trial postponed 
to July 26 by Federal Judge Murray 
Hulbert. 



Van Nomikos Closing City 

Chicago— The Van Nomikos City 
theater will close for the Summer. 



Recommended That NEIC 
Act as an Advisory Body 

(Continued from Page 1) 
merit field have now accepted the invitation 
to join in the work of the Council to go all 
out to aid the nation's war effort through 
a pool of amusement talent. The eight or- 
ganizations which had announced their ad- 
herence since last week's 25 are: SAG, Hol- 
lywood Victory Committee, SWG, Artists 
and^ Managers Guild, Chorus Equity, Authors 
League, National Theatrical Conference and 
the Theatrical Wardrobe Attendants Union. 

Plan for the conference to he held at the 
Waldorf-Astoria on July 14 and 15 was 
drawn up as follows: 

First day: 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 noon, a 
general business meeting. At 12 :30 lun- 
cheon with speakers representing the Gov- 
ernment and the Army outlining their re- 
spective needs from the entire industry. At 
the 2:30 p.m. session there will be three 
major speakers, one of whom at least will 
represent the Government, and the national 
organization will be set up. 

Second day the sessions will be thrown 
open for a discussion of what the Council 
members will do to meet the needs of the 
Army, the Government, the production front 
and the civilian front. 



Veronica Lake Hospitalized 

Hollywood — Veronica Lake, in- 
pured in a studio fall, will be hos- 
pitalized for several days. She is 
an expectant mother. 



HCLLyWCCD 
DIGEJT 



SIGNED 

AUDREY YOUNG, termer, M-C-M. 

ASSIGNMENTS 

LEWIS ALLEN, director, "Our Hearty Were 

• Young and Cay," Paramount. 
CASTINGS .lo: 

AL JOLSON, "Rhapsody in Blue," \js».ners; 
LYLE TALBOT. "Up in Arms," Samuel Coldwyn; 
TOMMY BATTEN, "The Kid in Upper 4," 
M-C-M; JUNE HAVOC and SHELDON LEONARD 
"Timber Queen," Paramount; EDGAR BUCHAN- 
AN, "Buffalo Bill," 20rh-Fox; DAME MAY 
WHITTY, "Gaslight," M-G-M; DOUGLAS 
FOWLEY, "The Story of Dr. Wassell," Paramount 
GEORGE GIVOT, "Government Girl," RKO 
LUIS ALBERNIj RALPH HODGES, "Nearly 
Eighteen," Monogram; MARGARET O'BRIEN. 
"My Name is Ruth," M-C-M. 
MICHAEL ARLEN, treatment, "If Winter 
Comes," M-C-M. 



CASTINGS 

FREDDIE STEELE, "Hail the Conquering 
Hero," Paramount; ALAN NAPIER, "Ministry 
of Fear," Paramount: TOM NEAL, "There's 
Something About a Soldier," Columbia. 

STORY PURCHASES 

"Pile Buck," from JOHN and WARD HAWKINS 

"Saboteur," purchased from Terneen Corp 

by Columbia. 



SCHEDULED 

"My Name is Ruth," producer, EDGAR SEL- 
WYN, story, ELINOR GRIFFIN and JOHN 
TWIST 



Si 



I 



BIR Will Approve 
Certain Pay increases 



(Continued from Page 1) 

ployers can show that the increases 
are necessary to maintain efficiency 
throughout the longer work week. 
The BIR jurisdiction extends only 
to salaried employes receiving over 
$5,000 per year and to executive ad- f 
ministrative and professional em- f( 
ployes earning less than that but 
not represented by a union. An 
executive employe, however, must 
ieceive over $30 per week and an 
administrative or professional em- 
ploye over $200 per month. 

The maximum increases which will 
be permitted by BIR's salary stab- 
ilization units will be those amounts 
necessary to retain minimum differ- 
entials between wage earners and 
the salaries of their supervisors. No 
set rule is established and approval 
is required at all times except on 
Oct. 3, 1942, and there has been no 
change in it since. 

Complete regulations for workers! 
in the higher pay brackets are still 
awaited. 



Rivoli Air Show Plugs "Tolls" 

Montague Salmon, managing di 
rector of the Rivoli Theater, has 
turned over the 22nd broadcast of 
"Poetry and Music," Sunday, 12 to 
1)2:15, to Paramount which will 
present a "For Whom the Bell Tolls' : 
program. Screen and radio artists 
will participate, in addition to Hen- 
ry Sylvern, at the console; Herbert 
Sheldon, reader and announcer, and 
Jess Randolph, the Voice of the 
Organ. 



Building 
Remodeling 



j^m^mmf^mi 




Equipment 
Maintenance 



DAILY 



* * * * 



NEW YORK, FRIDAY, JULY 2, 1943 



• * * * 



SERVICE PACTS INSURE WARTIME OPERATION 



Two Patent Measures to Be Hoppered in Fall 



Bone Bill Would Not 
Call for Compulsory 
Licensing by Inventors 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — Two measures af- 
fecting compulsory licensing of pat- 
ents will be presented to Congress 
following the Summer recess, Sena- 
tors Scott W. Lucas (Dem., 111.) and 
I Homer T. Bone (Dem., Wash.), Pat- 
ents Committee chairmen announce. 
tSen. Lucas will revive his measure 
''calling for compulsory patents li- 
censing introduced last year but 
which died before the 77th Congress 
had a chance to act upon it, while 
Sen. Bone will introduce a bill de- 
scribed as a modification of the 
Lucas proposal. 

While the Bone bill will not call 
for compulsory licensing, he holds 
that the measure ties in the anti- 
(Continued on Page 8) 



Equipment Field Notes 



78% of Possibilities 
Covered by Projection 
And Sound Agreements 



20-Year Life Span 
For Patents Urged 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM iDAILY 

1 . Washington — Compulsory licens- 
ng of patents, urged by the TNEC, 
.vas not recommended by the Pat- 
ents Planning Commission in its re- 
>ort submitted to President Roose- 
velt. Commission, in effect, thus re- 
ected the need for such a measure, 
lemand for which has been based 
»n the contention that patents cov- 
ering valuable inventions have 

{Continued on Page 8) 



Eastman's Dr. Jones 
Awarded Ives Medal 

Rochester — Dr. Loyd A. Jones, 
chief physicist of the Eastman Kodak 
Research Laboratories, has been 
awarded the Frederick Ives Medal 
for 1943 for distinguished work in 
optics, it has been announced by the 
Optical Society of America, which 
makes the award biennially. 

In addition to his work in optics, 
Dr. Jones is leading authority on 
tone reproduction in the photographic 
process. 



PRODUCTION of fiber floor-mats has 
' been cut off via issuance of a WPB 
order putting coir, — the fiber obtained from 
the shell of the cocoanut, — under restrictive 
controls. In the past, coir has been used 
primarily in manufacture of door mats, 
widely used by theaters, and there is no 
available substitute. The material is being 
allocated to manufacture of deck mats for 
Navy and merchant ships. 

* * * 

Dr. C. E. Kenneth Mees, research 
director for Eastman Kodak, has been 
named one of eight specialists to act in 
an advisory capacity to the office of 
Quartermaster General on problems of 
feeding, clothing and equipping the 
Army. 

* * * 

The Joy Theater in Dardanelle, Ark., 
owned by Malco Theaters, Inc., has been 
gutted by fire with a loss estimated at 
$25,000, partially covered by insurance. 
Manager J. C. Nelson said projection equip- 
ment and fixtures were a total loss. Im- 
mediate rebuilding of the house is planned. 

* * * 

Hattie Lutt, former aide at Roches- 
ter's Lyceum Theater, is serving as an 
information clerk in the office of the 
Rochester War Council. 

* * * 

The Prince, Princeville, III., in the Peoria 
district, has been reopened by its new 
owner, Harold Bouton. House was damaged 
by fire several weeks ago and was later 
sold by Ernest Peltier to Bouton. It has 
been entirely repaired and redecorated. 

* * * 

Arthur T. Hinnant and Clyde P. 
Pierce have bought the Clarence The- 
ater in Clarence, Mo., from John Hick 



erson. They will modernize the house. 

* * * 

Manager Ed Sperling, of the Confection 
Cabinet Co., vending machine channel to 
theaters, bid $75,000 at the Chicago Candy 
Co. auction to stimulate sales of War 
Bonds. He was leading bidder during the 
big event at the Hotel Sherman there. 

* * * 

Plans are under way to reopen the 
DeSoto Theater, Lake City, Fla. New 
sound equipment is being installed and 
other improvements made. 

* ♦ ♦ 
Indianapolis Victor Division of RCA has 

opened a downtown employment office there 
at 137 East Market St., for the sole pur- 
pose of hiring workers for the plant. RCA 
officials believe that the step will be a 
direct aid in acquiring the number of people 
needed for the local plant at the present 

time. 

* * * 

A new projection screen unit, de- 
signed primarily for our Armed Forces, 
and now available for educational and 
other visual training use, is announced 
by Radiant Manufacturing Corp., Chi- 
cago. The new item, called the Radiant 
Day-Time Projection Box, permits 
showing of pictures in broad daylight 
by means of a shadow box construc- 
tion. It has large audience capacity 
and assures high intensity dtte to a glass 
beaded, brilliant "Hy-Flect" screen sur- 
face, it is said. 

Bell & Howell have developed a new 
grinding compound which improves, techni- 
cians assert, the quality of finished lenses. 
Other plants throughout the country are 
adopting the new compound. 



Research to Bolster Markets 

Commercial Methods "Streamlined" in RCA 



New Florida Theater 
To Open In a Month 



Crestview, Fla. — The new Elgin 
theater is nearing completion and 
will be opened within a month. Neil 
Robinson and Tom Barrow are own- 
ers. 



Post-war expansion of new mar- 
kets with substantial reductions in 
consumer prices are seen as a result 
of applying scientific research meth- 
ods to commercial distribution, RCA 
announces through David Sarnoff, 
president. On the basis of two years' 
experimental study, the company be- 
lieves that scientific methods of cut- 
(Continued on Page 8) 



Unprecedently large volume of 
service pacts in force between thea- 
ter interests and service organiza- 
tions, such as Altec and RCA, assure 
for the war's duration the efficient 
operation of film houses, a checkup 
discloses. Survey of the situation 
was prompted this week by dis- 
patches from England which cited 
the fact that theaters there, after 
three years of war, are undergoing 
a critical stage of "physical decline" 
from the standpoint of equipment, 
particularly projection and sound 
units. 

Currently, there are more than 
9,000 U. S. film houses, it is esti- 
mated, having either service pacts 
or receiving service, in the case of 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Post-War Theater 
For Detroit Suburb 



Detroit — First post-war theater 
project for this territory has been 
launched on the architect's boards 
by Max Allen, owner of the Lincoln 
Park Theater in the suburb of Lin- 
coln Park, and his brothers. Project 
is a 2,000-seat house to adjoin the 
present theater which will become 
a subsequent-run. 

New one will be called the Willow, 
taking its name from the Ford Wil- 

(Continued on Page 8) 



NTS Surveying Post 
War Equipment Needs 

An equipment survey, via a bro- 
chure to be mailed to every exhibitor 
in the country within the next few 
days, will be undertaken by National 
Theatre Supply, it was revealed by 
Walter E. Green, president, in his 
talk at the Allied of New Jersey 
meeting earlier this week. Survey is 
part of the NTS program to insure 
ample quantities of equipment for 
replacement, modernization and new 
theaters when peace comes. 



^ f^HELP JIMMY BOOLITTLE KEEP THAT TOKYO RETURN DATE — BUY WAR STAMPS IN JVLY^ 



EQUIPMENT NEWS 



&*\ DAILY ■ 



Friday, July 2, 1942 




A Section of THE FILM DAILY compre- 
hensively covering the equipment field, pub- 
lished every second week by Wid's Films and 
Film Folks, Inc., 1501 Broadway, New York 
City. John W. Alicoate, Publisher; Donald 
M. Mersereau, General Manager; Chester B. 
Bahn, Editor; George H. Morris, Equipment 
Editor; West Coast Bureau, 6425 Hollywood 
Boulevard, Hollywood, Cal., Ralph Wilk, 
Bureau Chief. 



Service Agreements 
Insure Operation 

(Continued from Page 7) 

some circuits, from special depart- 
ments especially set up for that pur- 
pose. The accepted potential of the- 
aters which are logical customers for 
service is said to be between 11,000 
and 12,000. Therefore, as matters 
now stand, approximately 78 per 
cent of the potential is guaranteed 
projection and sound equipment pro- 
tection. 

Were it not for the fact that so 
many U. S. houses are "guarded" by 
service contracts, together with the 
favorable circumstance that a fairly 
satisfactory back-log of parts has 
been provided through the foresight 
and energies of projector and sound 
manufacturers, as well as through 
the contractual action of service 
companies themselves, domestic 
houses might well be in the uncom- 
fortable position in another eight 
months of war that British stands 
now find themselves. Latter's prob- 
lem is of course accentuated by the 
manufacturing emergency faced at 
the time of the conflict's outbreak 
when the making of reserve parts 
had to be sacrificed to the greater job 
of providing more urgently-needed 
sinews of war. Also an important 
factor in Britain's sound and pro- 
jection dilemma is her inability to 
import parts from this or any other 
country. 

One of the most reassuring factors 
in the matter of continued effective 
operation of U. S. stands is the full 
understanding of this essentiality by 
the War Production Board, head of 
whose Amusement Division is A. G. 
Smith, filmland alumnus, experienced 
both in the exhibition field itself as 
well as the technical realm pertain- 
ing thereto. 




For Excellence in the Production 
of Motion Picture Sound Equipment 



IT'S A FACT! 

War-born DEVRY preci- 
sion Theatre Projectors 
and Sound Systems pre- 
sent developments far 
beyond previously ac- 
cepted standards .DEVRY 
Corporation, 1112 Armi- 
tage Avenue, Chicago, 111. 




DeVW 

Hollywood • CHICAGO • New York 



20-Year Lite Span 
For Patents Urged 



(Continued from Page 7) 

sometimes been bought up or sup- 
pressed. 

Commission's recommendations in- 
cluded a suggestion that Congress 
pass legislation setting up a reason- 
able, understandable standard of 
patentability and a proposal to limit 
the patent terms from 20 years from 
the time of application instead of 
17 years from the time of granting 
of a patent. As the law now stands, 
inventors are sometimes able to re- 
frain from pushing a patent appli- 
cation so that a long pending per- 
iod preceeds the 17 year life of a 
granted patent. This was complained 
against by Thurman W. Arnold when 
he was head of the anti-trust division. 

Commission also called for com- 
pulsory recording with the U. S. 
Patent Office of (a) all existing 
agreements to which one of the part- 
ies is a citizen of a foreign country; 
(b) all existing agreements, regard- 
less of citizenship, which include 
any restrictions as to price, quan- 
tity of production, geographical 
areas or fields of use, and (c) all fu- 
ture agreements regardless of re- 
strictions and citizenship of the part- 
ies. 

A proposal to empoyer the Pat- 
ent Office to withdraw a patent in- 
advertently granted was included. 
It recommended that any person be 
given the right to challenge a patent 
within six months after its grant. 



First Post-War Theater 
For Det. Suburb Launched 



(Continued from Page 7) 

low Run plant which is a few miles 
westward. It is the first theater to 
be planned in the region of this 
plant since it was started a year and 
a half ago. No prospects of war- 
time construction are planned, al- 
though house would cater to the 
recreation needs of thousands of new 
war workers. Charles N. Agree is 
the architect. 



Midwest Theat. Supply 
Reports New Carpet Jobs 

Cincinnati — Jake Gelman of Mid- 
west Theater Supply announces that 
new carpet has been installed in 
the Eminence, Eminence, Ky.; the 
Clark, Grayson, Ky.; and the Clinton 
in Blanchester, and also in the Brad, 
Bradford, O. Midwest also fully 
equipped the Heights, recently re- 
opened by Robert Epps at Lock- 
land O. 



WHITEWAY 

ELECTRIC SIGN & MAINTENANCE CO. 

Thomas F. Flannery, President 

315-17 W. Walton St. Chicago, III. 

Delaware 9111 



UJWR Presenting 25 
Trucks to Russians 

United Jewish War Relief is pre- 
senting 25 mobile trucks to the 
Soviet Mission for use on the battle- 
front. Equipment includes DeVry 
sound projectors, Hallicraftex radio, 
Shure microphones and RCA turn- 
tables, it is announced by Norman D. 
Olson, manager of the DeVry Corp. 
export department. 



Research to Bolster 
Post-War Markets 



(Continued from Page 7) 

ting distribution costs will be a ma- 
jor factor in maintaining current 
high levels of employment, and that 
the new type of commercial research 
must be given importance equal to 
already established technical re- 
search methods. 

Study resulted from an examina- 
tion of radio industry costs which 
revealed that production costs were 
approaching a minimum but that dis- 
tribution costs were excessively high, 
and was undertaken by Commercial 
Research, a new department of RCA 
Victor Division, in Chicago. De- 
partment has completed nearly 40 
research projects in distribution, has 
developed new methods and prac- 
tices in both wholesale and retail 
distribution, installed a new system 
in Chicago for the wholesale distri- 
bution of phonograph records and 
has prepared plans for passing on 
the results of its research to RCA 
Victor's independent wholesale and 
retail dealers. 

According to Sarnoff, the new 
methods of "streamlining" distribu- 
tion are believed to be significant be- 
cause they are largely fundamental 
and, therefore, adaptable to other 
lines of merchandise. 



LARGEST SELECTION OF 

Popcorn Machines 

We Buy — Sell — and Service 

All Makes — All Models 

Write us 

KRISPY KORN EQUIPMENT 

120 S. Halsted St. CHICAGO, ILL. 



WE CAN 



STILL SUPPLY 

all standard 35mm. pre- 
cision projector replace- 
ment parts. 

We do not sell to 
theatres, direct. 

FREE — Our latest 
complete projector parts 

catalog. 

GIVE your dealer's name, 

when writing to get your 

copy of our catalog. 

WENZEL PROJECTOR CO. 




2505-19 South State St. 



Chicago, III. 



Senate Will Get Two 
Patents Proposals 

(Continued from Page 7) 

trust law, as does the Lucas bill. He 
proposes to insure licensing of vital 
patents via a "court approach" and 
claims that the bill is not inconsistent 
with the position taken in the recent 
Patents Planning Commission report 
which failed to recommend cor^nu]- 
sory licensing. 



Popcorn Equipment 
Demand Said Heavy 

Chicago — The Krispy Korn Equip- 
ment Co. at 120 S. Halstead St., 
reports a large demand from both 
the theater trade and the armed ser- 
vices for popcorn equipment. The 
factory is operating both day and 
night. The company is also buying 
used equipment. 



Reopens Modernized Varsity 

Urbana, 111. — Theodore K. An- 
thony has reopened the modernized 
Varsity Theater. 



SEEKING A DEPENDABLE 
SOURCE OF SUPPLY FOR YOUR 

THEATRE 
TICKETS? 



INTERNATIONAL OFFERS: 
Dependable service . . . Low cost . . . 
45 year's experience serving theatres, 
stadiums, amusement parks, etc. 
We can supply your needs. Roll, 
machine folded, reserve seats, etc. 
Write for samples, prices or other information. 

Delivery free Maine to Virginia. 

INTERNATIONAL 

TICKET (M\ COMPANY 

52 GRAFTON AVE. \9g/ NEWARK, N. J. 
Sales Of/ices m Principal Centers 



t's the pickest 
road to post- 
war equipment 

NATIONAL 

THEATRE SUPPLY'S 



I 



N 

1 S *7 *7 M {i I 

1 -J 1 S I z 

I (I ( I .' f I . I . , V* 



Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 




60 Nof £°py 



*CM 



cy e 



The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



2fc 



84, NO. 3 



NEW YORK, TUESDAY, JULY 6, 1943 



TEN CENTS 



STAGE JITS, NOVELSJEATURE WBJJNEUP 

Exhibs. Watch New Tax Effects on Attendance 



Pay Envelope Deductions 
Find Theater Men Appre- 
hensive of Dip in 'Takes' 

Wide speculation over possible ef- 
fects of the 20 per cent payroll de- 
ductions, effective this week, exists 
among both circuit and independent 
theater men. Operators are appre- 
hensive that the salary slice will 
cause a dip in theater attendance, 
particularly in houses largely pat- 
ronized by lower scale workers and 
white collar employes, many of whom 
have not benefited from the extra 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Employes of OWI Pic 
Bureau Given Notice 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — "Practically every- 
one" in the OWI motion picture bu- 
reau has been notified that he is 
terminated as of July 15, Lowell 
Mellett, bureau chief, admitted Fri- 
■ day. Who the exceptions are, he 

(Continued on Page 6) 



"Canteen" Biz 35-50% 
Ahead in First 1 1 Key Runs 



"Stage Door Canteen" in its first 
11 key city engagements is running 
from 35 to 50 per cent ahead of the 
company's top-grossing pictures, re- 

(Continucd on Page 6) 



C 'uban Critics Group 
Raps Censor Ruling 

Havana (By Air Mail, Passed by 
Censor) — Association of Motion Pic- 
ture and Theater Writers is pro- 
testing a ruling of the Cuban Film 
Censorship Board which ordered the 
destruction of "La que se Murio de 
Armor" and prohibits its export or 
exhibition. Board claims that the 
Cuban patriot Jose Marti is por- 
trayed in an unfavorable light in 
the picture while the Association 
holds that the Board is exceeding its 
powers. 



WARNERS OBTAIN $15,000,000 LOAN 

Brings to $23,000,000 Fund to Retire Domestic Bank Loans, 
Debentures and Preferred Stock 



Warner Bros, on Friday boosted to 
$23,000,000 the total of new financ- 
ing made available to the company 
when it obtained $15,000,000 in 
loans from a group of banks in this 
and other cities to retire all pres- 
ently outstanding domestic bank 
loans, six per cent debentures and 



preferred stock. The loans will ma- 
ture through June 1, 1949, with in- 
terest at the rate of 2% per cent 
per annum. That the $23,000,000 fi- 
nancing deal was set was reported ex- 
clusively in The Film Daily June 30. 
The domestic bank loans to be paid 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Leffon PRC Central 
District Manager 



Appointment of Nat Lefton as 
PRC's district manager for Cleve- 
land, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh and De- 
troit was announced Friday by Ar- 
thur Greenblatt, general sales man- 
ager, at the closing session of the 
company's regional sales conference 
at the Park Central Hotel. 

Lefton, who took over the Cleve- 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Picketing of "Moscow" 
Brings Boston Arrests 

Boston — Two pickets, one a young 
married woman, the other a min- 
ister, were arrested in front of the 
Paramount theater as they and 
{Continued on Page 3) 



RKO, Disney Add Year 
To Releasing Pact 



Walt Disney short subjects and 
features will continue to be distrib- 
uted by RKO for another season un- 
der the terms of an agreement signed 
Friday between Ned E. Depinet, pres- 
ident of RKO Radio, and Roy Dis- 
ney representing Walt Disney Pro- 
ductions, it was announced by N. 
Peter Rathvon, RKO president. 

New pact covers distribution of 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Okay Seen for 20th-Fox 
National Theaters Deal 



The proposal to purchase from the 
Chase National Bank the controlling 
interest in National Theaters for 
$13,000,000 is expected to be ap- 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Metro Starts Sales Analysis 

Each Account to be Studied, Rodgers Says 



Omaha Curfew Ordinance 
Aimed at Juve Vandalism 



Omaha — A curfew ordinance for- 
bidding children under 16 on the 
streets from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. unless 
with an adult and making parents 
liable has been introduced in City 
Council. 

Police Commissioner Richard Jep- 

(Continued on Page 6) 



In an effort to analyze every ac- 
count so that an intelligent sales ap- 
proach can be made, M-G-M sales 
executives next week will fan out 
over the country and visit all of its 
exchanges. First of the sessions will 
be held in Cincinnati on Friday. 

Procedure, according to W. F. 
Rodgers, general sales manager, is 
an annual event. Every account, he 
said, will be given a careful and 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Six Musicals and As Many 
Biographies Included on 
Program for New Season 

With Labor Day, opening of the 
1943-44 season nine weeks away, 
Warners has a backlog of 14 features 
completed; five 
more are in pro- 
duction, and a 
dozen are ready 
to start shooting 
as soon as studio 
space is available, 
Ben Kalmenson, 
general sales 
manager, an- 
nounces. Lineup 
will include 12 
Broadway stage 
hits, an even larg- 
er number of pub- 
lished novels, and 
will comprise six 
musicals and six biographies. 

Market conditions will decide the 

(Continued on Page 8) 




BEN KALMENSON 



War Short a Week 
If Pic Bureau Ends 



Groundwork for a plan whereby 
the projected 52 war shorts may be 
distributed in the absence of the 
OWI film bureau was laid at a meet- 
ing of the distributors' committee 

(Continued on Page 6) 



1XEIC Service Flag 
For All Show World 

The National Entertainment In- 
dustry Council is mapping plans to 
raise in Times Square a service flag 
to represent the entire amusement 
world. The raising ceremonies will 
take place on July 14, probably 
around midnight, at a site at 43rd 
St. and Broadway. Workers in every 
branch of show business will partici- 
pate in the exercises. They have 
been asked to appear in working 
get-up. Harry Brandt is handling 
arrangements for the filming of the 
event. 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 6, 1943 




Vol. 84, No. 3 Tues., July 6, 1943 10 Cents 
JOHN W. ALICOATE : : : : Publisher 



DONALD M. MERSEREAU : General Manager 



CHESTER B. BAHN : 



Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terras (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address- 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo* de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco-Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



20th-Fox Publicity-Ad 
Staff Fetes Joe Shea 



Members of the 20th-Fox public- 
ity, advertising and exploitation de- 
partment on Friday said good-bye to 
Joe Shea at a luncheon at Barbetta's 
Restaurant. Shea has left the com- 
pany, where he was trade press con- 
tact, to become New York publicity 
representative and story editor of 
William Cagney Productions, posts 
which he takes over officially today. 

Among those present were Rod- 
ney Bush, Sidney Blumenstock, Sam 
Shain, Dave Bader, Molly Grill, Kay 
O'Brien, Ruth Simon, Dorothy May, 
Jeanette Sawyer, Christy Wilbert, 
Lou Frich and Ira Tulipan, plus 
Earl Wingart and Sgt. Irving Kahn, 
former members of the department. 



Joe Shea Opens Office 

Joe Shea, New York publicity man- 
ager and Eastern story editor for 
William Cagney Productions, has 
opened his office at 729 7th Avenue, 
Room 311. 



MITCHELL MAY, Jr. 

CO., INC. 
INSURANCE 

Specializing 

in requirements of the 

Motion Picture Industry 

75 Maiden Lane, New York 
510 W. 6th St Los Angeles 



® The Broadway Parade S 

Picture and Distributor Theater 

Mission to Moscow (Warner Bros. Pictures) — 10th week Hollywood 

Spitfire (RKO Radio-Goldwyn-Howard) — 4th week Rivoli 

Coney Island (Twentieth Century-Fox) — 3rd week Roxy 

Stage Door Canteen (United Artists-Sol Lesser) — 2nd week Capitol 

The Youngest Profession (Metro-Coldwyn-Mayer Pictures) — 2nd week Music Hall 

Dixie (Paramount Pictures) — 2nd week Paramount 

Best Foot Forward (Metro-Coldwyn-Mayer Pictures) — 2nd week Astor 

Crime Doctor (Columbia Pictures) Globe 

Bombardier ( RKO Radio Pictures) Criterion 

Two Tickets to London (Universal Pictures) Rialto 

This Land is Mine (RKO Radio Pictures) (a-b) Palace 

Chatterbox (Republic Pictures) (a) Palace 

Leather Burners (United Artists) — Opens tomorrow (a) New York 

Cowboy Commandos (Republic Pictures) — Opens tomorrow (a) New York 

♦ FOREIGN LANGUAGE FEATURES ♦ 

The Russian Story (Artkino Pictures) — 5th week Stanley 

A Fire in the Straw (Herbert Rosener) (a) World 

The Pledge to Bataan (Adventure Pictures) (a-d) World 

Marvels of the Bullring (Crovos-Mohme) Belmont 

♦ FUTURE OPENINGS ♦ 

For Whom the Bell Tolls (Paramount Pictures) — July 14 Rivoli 

Stormy Weather (Twentieth Century-Fox Films) — July 21 Roxy 

Let's Face It (Paramount Pictures) — Aug. 2 Paramount 

This is the Army (Warner Bros. Pictures) — July 28 Hollywood 

DuBarry Was a Lady (Metro-Coldwyn-Mayer Pictures) (c) Capitol 

Mister Lucky (RKO Radio Pictures) (c) Music Hall 

Thin Ice (Universal Pictures) (c) Criterion 

Victory Through Air Power (Walt Disney) — July 17 Globe 

The Constant Nymph (Warner Bros. Pictures) — July 23 Strand 

Action in the North Atlantic (Warner Bros. Pictures) — July 8 (a-b) Palace 

Prairie Chickens (United Artists) — July 8 (a) Palace 

Hotel Concordia (Crovos-Mohme) (c) Belmont 

(a) Dual bill, (b) Subsequent run. (c) Follows current bill, (d) News film with 
English commentary. 



Downey's Illness Delays 
Mich. Arbitration Hearings 

Detroit — -Setting of a date for 
hearing in both of the two arbitra- 
tion cases filed here since 1942, one 
by the Family Theater in Grand 
Rapids, and the other by the Huron 
Theater in Pontiac, has been delayed 
by the serious illness of Frank J. 
Downey, M-G-M branch manager, 
who is a principal figure in both 
cases. Downey is not expected back 
until some time in August. 

Vacation schedules, particularly of 
counsel for the majors involved, are 
also causing difficulties in setting a 
suitable date for the hearings. 



951-Star Service Flag 
Raised at Metro Studios 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Working model of the 
new U. <S. cruiser Los Angeles, now 
being, built to augment the American 
battle fleet, was presented to Admiral 
I. C. Johnson by Louis B. Mayer at 
Metro's studios Friday in connection 
with the raising of a service flag 
honoring 951 studio employes now in 
Uniform. Model will be taken on a 
War Bond-selling and WAVES re- 
cruiting tour through the West. 
Navy wants 1,000 WAVES to re- 
place 1,000 men needed for the Los 
Angeles' complement. 

Mich. VFW Slaps "Moscow" 

Detroit — Formal condemnation of 
"Mission to Moscow" was voted in 
a resolution by the State conven- 
tion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, 
following an attack by Michigan 
Department Commander Joseph W. 
Mann, charging that the film ridi- 
culed American democracy and Con- 
gress. 



Okay Seen for 20th-Fox 
National Theaters Deal 



(Continued from Page 1) 

proved today at the special meet- 
ing of the 20th-Fox stockholders to 
be held at the company's home office. 
Approval of the deal will open the 
way to making the circuit the wholly- 
owned subsidiary of the film company. 
At present Chase owns 58 per cent 
of the shares of National Theaters, 
with 20th-Fox holding the remaining 
42 per cent. 

The stockholders also are expected 
to act favorably on a proposed 
amendment to the company's charter 
authorizing the creation of a new 
prior preferred stock to be sold 
publicly, with the proceeds going 
toward the purchase of the National 
Theater shares from Chase. 



Farewell Luncheon Given 
For Turnbull at 20th Studio 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — A farewell luncheon 
at which every department of the 
studio was represented was given 
for Ernest Turnbull, managing di- 
rector of the Hoyt circuit, who re- 
turns to Australia in the next few 
days. Also present were executives 
of Fox West Coast Theaters and 
theater division and district manag- 
ers from all over the nation. Among 
those on hand were Joseph M. 
Schenck, Spyros Skouras, William 
Goetz, Charles Skouras, Tom Con- 
nors, Murray, Silverstone, Joe E. 
Brown. Schenck, Charles Skouras 
and Turnbull were the chief speak- 
ers. 

Turnbull said that after the war 
Australia will offer a still more 
prosperous market to American pic- 
tures. 



Thompson Back from 
Pacific to Convalesce 



Detroit — Neal Thompson, son of 
N. Dow Thompson, former office man- 
ager of Allied Theaters of Michigan, 
now district manager at Reno for 
T & D, Jr., Enterprises Circuit, has 
been returned to the Marine base at 
San Diego, Cal., to recover from 
malarial fever contracted in eight 
months' service in the South Paf**^ 
including Guadalcanal. He was \. -t 
hospitalized in New Zealand. 



NEW YORK 
THEATERS 



RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL 

ROCKEFELLER CENTER 

THE YOUNGEST PROFESSION' 

with 

VIRGINIA WEIDLER, EDWARD ARNOLD 

and Five Important Guest Stars 

AN M-G-M PICTURE 

MARCH OF TIME— "INVASION" 

Gala Stage Revue • Symphony Orchestra 

First Mezzanine Seats Reserved. Clrclt 6-4600 



RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL 




The Timeliest MARCH OF TIME 



BETTY GRABLE 



GEORGE MONTGOMERY* CESAR ROMERO 

Cone? isiand 

A JOTH CENTURY-FOX PICTURE in TECHNICOLOR 

• PLUS A BIG STAGE SHOW * 

BUY T% f\ ■%#• W 7ihAVE 

BONDS IV WW 1 50th ST. 



"DIXIE" • m Person 

with ~k ANDREWS SISTERS 

BING CROSBY + TIM HERBERT 

DOROTHY LAMOIR -jr MITCHELL AYRES 

A Paramount Picture -fc and his orchestra 



Cool 



PARAMOU NT Times Square 



B WAY & 
47th St. 



GEO. SANDERS . MAUREEN O'HARA 

"THIS LAND IS MINE" 

ano 

"CHATTERBOX" 

JOE E. BROWN . JUDY CANOVA 



lows STATE 



ON SCREEN 

THE HUMAN 

COMEDY 

STARRING 

MICKEY ROONEY 



IN PERSON 

TITOCUIZAR 

MILDRED 

BAILEY 

EXTRA! 

VAN 

ALEXANDER 

& ORCH. 



_, 






Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 





The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



-1FDAILY' 



84, NO. 3 



NEW YORK, TUESDAY, JULY 6, 1943 



TEN CENTS 



STAGE JHTS, NOVELSJTATURE WBJJNEUP 

Exhibs. Watch New Tax Effects on Attendance 



Pay Envelope Deductions 
Find Theater Men Appre- 
hensive of Dip in 'Takes' 

Wide speculation over possible ef- 
fects of the 20 per cent payroll de- 
ductions, effective this week, exists 
among both circuit and independent 
theater men. Operators are appre- 
hensive that the salary slice will 
cause a dip in theater attendance, 
particularly in houses largely pat- 
ronized by lower scale workers and 
white collar employes, many of whom 
have not benefited from the extra 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Employes of OWI Pic 
Bureau Given Notice 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — "Practically every- 
one" in the OWI motion picture bu- 
reau has been notified that he is 
terminated as of July 15, Lowell 
Mellett, bureau chief, admitted Fri- 
day. Who the exceptions are, he 

(Continued on Page 6) 



"Canteen" Biz 35-50% 
Ahead in First 11 Key Runs 



"Stage Door Canteen" in its first 
11 key city engagements is running 
from 35 to 50 per cent ahead of the 
company's top-grossing pictures, re- 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Cuban Critics Group 
Raps Censor Ruling 

Havana (By Air Mail, Passed by 
Censor) — Association of Motion Pic- 
ture and Theater Writers is pro- 
testing a ruling of the Cuban Film 
Censorship Board which ordered the 
destruction of "La que se Murio de 
Armor" and prohibits its export or 
exhibition. Board claims that the 
Cuban patriot Jose Marti is por- 
trayed in an unfavorable light in 
the picture while the Association 
holds that the Board is exceeding its 
powers. 



WARNERS OBTAIN $15,000,000 LOAN 

Brings to $23,000,000 Fund to Retire Domestic Bank Loans, 
Debentures and Preferred Stock 



Warner Bros, on Friday boosted to 
$23,000,000 the total of new financ- 
ing made available to the company 
when it obtained $15,000,000 in 
loans from a group of banks in this 
and other cities to retire all pres- 
ently outstanding domestic bank 
loans, six per cent debentures and 



preferred stock. The loans will ma- 
ture through June 1, 1949, with in- 
terest at the rate of 2% per cent 
per annum. That the $23,000,000 fi- 
nancing deal was set was reported ex- 
clusively in The Film Daily June 30. 
The domestic bank loans to be paid 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Leflon PRC Central 
District Manager 



Appointment of Nat Lefton as 
PRC's district manager for Cleve- 
land, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh and De- 
troit was announced Friday by Ar- 
thur Greenblatt, general sales man- 
ager, at the closing session of the 
company's regional sales conference 
at the Park Central Hotel. 

Lefton, who took over the Cleve- 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Picketing of "Moscow" 
Brings Boston Arrests 

Boston — Two pickets, one a young 
married woman, the other a min- 
ister, were arrested in front of the 
Paramount theater as they and 
{Continued on Page 3) 



RKO, Disney Add Year 
To Releasing Pad 



Walt Disney short subjects and 
features will continue to be distrib- 
uted by RKO for another season un- 
der the terms of an agreement signed 
Friday between Ned E. Depinet, pres- 
ident of RKO Radio, and Roy Dis- 
ney representing Walt Disney Pro- 
ductions, it was announced by N. 
Peter Rathvon, RKO president. 

New pact covers distribution of 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Okay Seen for 20th-Fox 
National Theaters Deal 



The proposal to purchase from the 
Chase National Bank the controlling 
interest in National Theaters for 
$13,000,000 is expected to be ap- 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Metro Starts Sales Analysis 

Each Account to be Studied, Rodgers Says 



Omaha Curfew Ordinance 
Aimed at Juve Vandalism 



Omaha — A curfew ordinance for- 
bidding children under 16 on the 
streets from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. unless 
with an adult and making parents 
liable has been introduced in City 
Council. 

Police Commissioner Richard Jep- 

(Continued on Page 6) 



In an effort to analyze every ac- 
count so that an intelligent sales ap- 
proach can be made, M-G-M sales 
executives next week will fan out 
over the country and visit all of its 
exchanges. First of the sessions will 
be held in Cincinnati on Friday. 

Procedure, according to W. F. 
Rodgers, general sales manager, is 
an annual event. Every account, he 
said, will be given a careful and 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Six Musicals and As Many 
Biographies Included on 
Program for New Season 

With Labor Day, opening of the 
1943-44 season nine weeks away, 
Warners has a backlog of 14 features 
completed; five 
more are in pro- 
duction, and a 
dozen are ready 
to start shooting 
as soon as studio 
space is available, 
Ben Kalmenson, 
general sales 
manager, an- 
nounces. Lineup 
will include 12 
Broadway stage 
, hits, an even larg- 
I er number of pub- 

BEN KALMENSON [is * ed nove J s > and 
will comprise six 
musicals and six biographies. 

Market conditions will decide the 

(Continued on Page 8) 




War Short a Week 
If Pic Bureau Ends 



Groundwork for a plan whereby 
the projected 52 war shorts may be 
distributed in the absence of the 
OWI film bureau was laid at a meet- 
ing of the distributors' committee 

(Continued on Page 6) 



HEIC Service Flag 
For All Show World 

The National Entertainment In- 
dustry Council is mapping plans to 
raise in Times Square a service flag 
to represent the entire amusement 
world. The raising ceremonies will 
take place on July 14, probably 
around midnight, at a site at 43rd 
St. and Broadway. Workers in every 
branch of show business will partici- 
pate in the exercises. They have 
been asked to appear in working 
get-up. Harry Brandt is handling 
arrangements for the filming of the 
event. 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 6, 1943 




Vol. 84, No. 3 Tues., July 6, 1943 10 Cents 
JOHN W. ALICOATE : : : : Publisher 



DONALD M. MERSEREAU : General Manager 



CHESTER B. BAHN 



: : Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address- 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 VVardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco-Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



20th-Fox Publicity-Ad 
Staff Fetes Joe Shea 



Members of the 20th-Fox public- 
ity, advertising and exploitation de- 
partment on FridAy said good-bye to 
Joe Shea at a luncheon at Barbetta's 
Restaurant. Shea has left the com- 
pany, where he was trade press con- 
tact, to become New York publicity 
representative and story editor of 
William Cagney Productions, posts 
which he takes over officially today. 

Among those present were Rod- 
ney Bush, Sidney Blumenstock, Sam 
Shain, Dave Bader, Molly Grill, Kay 
O'Brien, Ruth Simon, Dorothy May, 
Jeanette Sawyer, Christy Wilbert, 
Lou Frich and Ira Tulipan, plus 
Earl Wingart and Sgt. Irving Kahn, 
former members of the department. 



Joe Shea Opens Office 

Joe Shea, New York publicity man- 
ager and Eastern story editor for 
William Cagney Productions, has 
opened his office at 729 7th Avenue, 
Room 311. 



MITCHELL MAY, Jr. 

CO., INC. 
INSURANCE 

Specializing 

in requirements of the 

Motion Picture Industry 

75 Maiden Lane, New York 
510 W. 6th St. Los Angeles 



H The Broadway Parade H 

Picture and Distributor Theater 

Mission to Moscow (Warner Bros. Pictures) — 10th week Hollywood 

Spitfire (RKO Radio-Coldwyn-Howard) — 4th week Rivoli 

Coney Island (Twentieth Century-Fox) — 3rd week Roxy 

Stage Door Canteen (United Artists-Sol Lesser) — 2nd week Capitol 

The Youngest Profession (Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures) — 2nd week Music Hall 

Dixie (Paramount Pictures) — 2nd week Paramount 

Best Foot Forward (Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures) — 2nd week Astor 

Crime Doctor (Columbia Pictures) Globe 

Bombardier (RKO Radio Pictures) Criterion 

Two Tickets to London (Universal Pictures) Rialto 

This Land is Mine (RKO Radio Pictures) (a-b) Palace 

Chatterbox (Republic Pictures) (a) Palace 

Leather Burners (United Artists) — Opens tomorrow (a) New York 

Cowboy Commandos (Republic Pictures) — Opens tomorrow (a) New York 

♦ FOREIGN LANGUAGE FEATURES ♦ 

The Russian Story (Artkino Pictures) — 5th week Stanley 

A Fire in the Straw (Herbert Rosener) (a) World 

The Pledge to Bataan (Adventure Pictures) (a-d) World 

Marvels of the Bullring (Grovos-Mohme) Belmont 

♦ FUTURE OPENINGS ♦ 

For Whom the Bell Tolls (Paramount Pictures) — July 14 Rivoli 

Stormy Weather (Twentieth Century-Fox Films) — July 21 Roxy 

Let's Face It (Paramount Pictures) — Aug. 2 Paramount 

This is the Army (Warner Bros. Pictures) — July 28 Hollywood 

DuBarry Was a Lady (Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures) (c) Capitol 

Mister Lucky (RKO Radio Pictures) (c) Music Hall 

Thin Ice (Universal Pictures) (c) Criterion 

Victory Through Air Power (Walt Disney) — July 17 Globe 

The Constant Nymph (Warner Bros. Pictures) — July 23 Strand 

Action in the North Atlantic (Warner Bros. Pictures) — July 8 (a-b) Palace 

Prairie Chickens (United Artists)— July 8 (a) Palace 

Hotel Concordia (Grovos-Mohme) (c) Belmont 

(a) Dual bill, (b) Subsequent run. (c) Follows current bill, (d) News film with 
English commentary. 



Downey's Illness Delays 
Mich. Arbitration Hearings 

Detroit — Setting of a date for 
hearing in both of the two arbitra- 
tion cases filed here since 1942, one 
by the Family Theater in Grand 
Rapids, and the other by the Huron 
Theater in Pontiac, has been delayed 
by the serious illness of Frank J. 
Downey, M-G-M branch manager, 
who is a principal figure in both 
cases. Downey is not expected back 
until some time in August. 

Vacation schedules, particularly of 
counsel for the majors involved, are 
also causing difficulties in setting a 
suitable date for the hearings. 



951-Star Service Flag 
Raised at Metro Studios 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Working model of the 
new U. iS. cruiser Los Angeles, now 
being built to augment the American 
battle fleet, was presented to Admiral 
I. C. Johnson by Louis B. Mayer at 
Metro's studios Friday in connection 
with the raising of a service flag 
honoring 951 studio employes now in 
uniform. Model will be taken on a 
War Bond-selling and WAVES re- 
cruiting tour through the West. 
Navy wants 1,000 WAVES to re- 
place 1,000 men needed for the Los 
Angeles' complement. 

Mich. VFW Slaps "Moscow" 

Detroit — Formal condemnation of 
"Mission to Moscow" was voted in 
a resolution by the State conven- 
tion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, 
following an attack by Michigan 
Department Commander Joseph W. 
Mann, charging that the film ridi- 
culed American democracy and Con- 
gress. 



Okay Seen for 20th-Fox 
National Theaters Deal 



(Continued from Page 1) 

proved today at the special meet- 
ing of the 20th-Fox stockholders to 
be held at the company's home office. 
Approval of the deal will open the 
way to making the circuit the wholly- 
owned subsidiary of the film company. 
At present Chase owns 58 per cent 
of the shares of National Theaters, 
with 20th-Fox holding the remaining 
42 per cent. 

The stockholders also are expected 
to act favorably on a proposed 
amendment to the company's charter 
authorizing the creation of a new 
prior preferred stock to be sold 
publicly, with the proceeds going 
toward the purchase of the National 
Theater shares from Chase. 



Farewell Luncheon Given 
For Turnbull at 20th Studio 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — A farewell luncheon 
at which every department of the 
studio was represented was given 
for Ernest Turnbull, managing di- 
rector of the Hoyt circuit, who re- 
turns to Australia in the next few 
days. Also present were executives 
of Fox West Coast Theaters and 
theater division and district manag- 
ers from all over the nation. Among 
those on hand were Joseph M. 
Schenck, Spyros Skouras, William 
Goetz, Charles Skouras, Tom Con- 
nors, Murray, Silverstone, Joe E. 
Brown. Schenck, Charles Skouras 
and Turnbull were the chief speak- 
ers. 

Turnbull said that after the war 
Australia will offer a still more 
prosperous market to American pic- 
tures. 



Thompson Back from 
Pacific to Convalesce 



Detroit — Neal Thompson, son of 
N. Dow Thompson, former office man- 
ager of Allied Theaters of Michigan, 
now district manager at Reno for 
T & D, Jr., Enterprises Circuit, has 
been returned to the Marine base at 
San Diego, Cal., to recover from 
malarial fever contracted in eieht 
months' service in the South Pa( 
including Guadalcanal. He was first 
hospitalized in New Zealand. 



NEW YORK 
THEATERS 



RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL 

ROCKEFELLER CENTER 

THE YOUNGEST PROFESSION' 

with 

VIRGINIA WEIDLER, EDWARD ARNOLD 

and Five Important Guest Stars 

AN M-G-M PICTURE 

MARCH OF TIME— "INVASION" 

Gala Stage Revue « Symphony Orchestra 

First Mezzanine Seats Reserved. Circle 6-460Q 



RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL 




The Timeliest MARCH OF TIME 



J^ BETTY GRABLE fc 

GEORGE MONTGOMERY* CESAR ROMERO 

Cone? isiamd 

A JOTH CENTURY- FOX PICTURE in TECHNICOLOR 

• PLUS A BIG STAGE SHOW • 

BUY W% f\ V "V "HAVE. 

BONDS IV W ^V 1 50th ST. 



"DIXIE" • In Person 

with *k ANDREWS SISTERS 

BING CROSBY TfV TIM HERBERT 

DOROTHY LAMOL'R -fc MITCHELL AYRES 

A Paramount Picture -jf and his orchestra 



Cool 



PARAMOUNT Times Square 



PALACE 


B WAY & 


47th St. 


GEO. SANDERS . MAUREEr 


1 O'HARA 


"THIS LAND IS MINE" 


ana 


"CHATTERBOX" 


JOE E. BROWN . JUDY CANOVA 



p 



loTw'sSTRTE 



ON SCREEN 

THE HUMAN 

COMEDY 

STARRING 

MICKEY ROONEY 



I 



A 



IN PERSON 

TITO GUIZAR 

MILDRED 

BAILEY 

EXTRA! 

VAN 

ALEXANDER 

& ORCH. 



Tuesday, July 6, 1943 



m B$i 



DAILY 



Warners (hi. Sales 
Meet Opens Thursday 



Second of Warners' regional sales 
meeting gets under way Thursday at 
the Blackstone Hotel, Chicago, in 
the wake of the curtain raiser which 
closed at the Waldorf here on Sat- 
- fllay with a breakfast to the dele- 
tes hosted by Ben Kalmenson, 
"SSies head, and several windup con- 
ferences. 

Friday's session of the local meet- 
ing drew 120, including Warner 
Theaters department execs. On the 
dais, in addition to Kalmenson, were 
Joseph Bernhard, Samuel Schneider, 
Harry M. Kalmine, Mort Blumen- 
stock, Harry Goldberg, Arthur Sach- 
son, Roy Haines, Jules Lapidus, Sam 
E. Morris, Howard Levinson, Nor- 
man H. Moray, A. W. Schwalberg, 
Albert S. Howson. In addition to 
the previous day's delegation, at- 
tendance also included Stuart Aarons, 
H. M. Doherty, Rudy Weiss, Stan- 
ley Hatch, and other theater and 
sales department executives. 

After his introductory remarks. Kalmen- 
son turned the rostrum over to Albert S. 
Howson, Eastern scenario editor and direc- 
tor of censorship, who talked for over three 
hours on the company's inventory of com- 
pleted pictures, those in production and in 
preparation and story properties held by the 
company for early production. Howson gave 
details of more than 60 stories, all defi- 
nitely scheduled for release in coming- sea- 
sons. 

Joseph Bernhard, who delivered the prin- 
cipal talk on the opening- day, again spoke 
briefly, and there were short addresses by 
Harry M. Kalmine, on exhibition matters: 
Mort Blumenstoek, on advertising- and mer- 
chandising plans: Harry Goldberer, who cited 
the number of pictures with sociological value 
produced regularly by Warners: Samuel 
Schneider, on business matters: Sam E. 
Morris, on general topics: Howard Levin- 
son, on legal aspects of contracts; Arthur 
Sachson, on sales, and others. 

Roy Haines, Jules Lapidus, A. W. 
Schwalberg and Norman H. Moray also held 
group meetings with the salesmen, with Ed 
Hinchey. Mike Dolid, H. M. Doherty and 
Stanley Hatch among the participants. 




M of T Will Introduce 
Black at Buffet Supper 

Howard Black, vice-president of 
Time, Inc., recently designated to 
take charge of M of T sales and dis- 
tribution policies, will be introduced 
to the trade press at an informal 
buffet supper at the Cloud Club in 
the Chrysler Building Thursday. A 
screening of the latest M of T sub- 
ject, "Bill Jack vs. Adolph Hitler," 
will precede the reception. 




Al Wilkie Jay Blaufox 

Don M. Mersereau Frank E. Garbutt 

Sam Lefkowitz 



T ▼ T 

Yes, Sir, a Great Affair! 

• • • IT WAS A GREAT affair We mean New Jersey Allied's 

annual conference last week down at West End, N. J Maybe it 

was because the affair was held far from outside diversions that might 

have attracted the delegates away from the purpose of the sessions 

Anyway, nobody can deny it was one of the biggest and best affairs 

held by the unit thanks to E. Thornton Kelley, Harry Lowenstein 

and others who helped to make it a success A highlight of the 

affair, hitherto un-publicized due to trade paper deadlines at their 
respective presses, was 20th Century-Fox's cocktail party which im- 
mediately preceded the banquet Thursday night 20th-Fox proved 

to be a grand host and the guy who said he didn't enjoy himself wasn't 

there And then there was M-G-M's exhibit — a wagon full of scrap 

metal with a hundred dollar war Bond as the award for the person 

who guessed the total weight And then there was the Walt Dis- 

ney-UA booth which had a complete exhibit of aircraft models, from 
the first effort of the Wright brothers to those of modern design — all 

in the interest of "Victory Through Air Power" And UA kept the 

convention visitors informed of up-to-the-minute news with a teletype 

which ground out second-by-second records of world events In fact, 

practically every outfit in the business from Newcomer Cinema-Craft up 

to the loftiest major had an interesting exhibit And that "cabaret" 

Wednesday night was flooded with the best talent ever seen at a 
New Jersey Allied convention or a national one for that matter 

T T T 

• • • A demonstration of real classy swimming and diving was 
presented Thursday morning in the out-door pool alongside the 
Hollywood Hotel the event being highlighted by somebody- 
pushing Bennie Brooks into the water And to get away from 

the social side of the event the boys really got down to work on their 

own problems even at the sacrifice of several good gin rummy 

and poker games While it was obvious that several exhibs. had 

axes to grind, it was unique that not a resolution of condemnation or 
otherwise nor a specific grievance was offered for adoption by the 

respective resolutions and grievance committees Yes, taking it 

all-in-all New Jersey Allied put on a great convention and show and 
there was some talk about holding future meetings at the same place, 
most of the boys preferring it to the rush-and-push of Atlantic City, 
the former scene of the New Jersey unit's annual get-to-gethers 

T ▼ T 

• • • OF course, it's only natural under the circumstances, but 
that doesn't detract one bit from the Paramount publicity bull's-eye 
scored by the Satevpost in its current issue for Para.'s new short series, 

"Little Lulu" The "Keeping Posted" column is largely devoted to 

Little Lulu's forthcoming film debut and to Little Lulu's pen-and-ink Mom, 

Marge, who introduced the cartoon character in June, 1935 There's 

an unconscious bit of humor, too, in the fact that the "Keeping Posted" 
column this time is spotted alongside the white space for which another 
major company paid heavy dough. . . • Speaking of mags., the July 
12 issue of Life will be given over to Republic's Roy Rogers and the 
inevitable Trigger while the issue's close-up feature will be H. Allen 
Smith's profile of R.R. 

T ▼ ▼ 

• • • AVENGE PEARL HARBOR! 



COmiHG and GOING 



SPYROS SKOURAS, 20th-Fcx prexy. is back 
from studio production conferences. 

HARRY COHN has arrived in New York. 

DAVID ROSE has gone to the Coast. 

F. J. A. McCARTHY, Southern division sales 
| manager, returns to the Universal home office 
today from Atlanta foils wing close of his last 
regional meeting there. 

FRED MEYERS, Universal Eastern division man- 
ager, returned from Philadelphia at the week- 
end. 

JUDY GARLAND has arrived in New York. 
This week the star will start on another USO- 
Camp Shows four. 

MAJ. WILLIAM WYLER is in Hollywood. 

BRETAICNE WINDUST returned to the Coast 

Monday from New York. 

EDWARD C. RAFTERY returned from Holly- 
wood yesterday. 

0. HENRY BRICCS, PRC prexy ARTHUR 
CREENBLATT, sales chief, and NAT L. LEFTON, 
new PRC district manager, leave for the Coast 
on Friday. 

ROUBEN MAMOULIAN has returned to the 

Coast after seven months in New York. 

TOM CONNORS, 20th-Fox distribution head, 
and MAURICE SILVERSTONE, the company's 
foreign chief, have returned from the Coast. 

ROBERT SCHLESS, general foreign manager 
for Warners, is back from a 10-day trip to 
Mexico. 

BILL BRUMBERG and PHIL ENCEL, Warners 
field reps, for the Central and New England 
territories, respectively, returned from New 
York over the week-end. 



Picketing of "Moscow" 
Brings Boston Arrests 

(Continued from Page 1) 

others protested against the show- 
ing of "Mission to Moscow" in Bos- 
ton. Previously the Boston City 
Council had demanded that the film 
be not shown but Mayor Maurice J. 
Tobin overruled this demand and 
permitted the film to open after an 
extensive Warner exploitation cam- 
paign. 

The local film critics Friday 
treated the film very cautiously, 
neither enthusing over it nor con- 
demning it and obviously feeling 
their way. 

Those arrested were the Rev. Vil- 
mar Rose of Rockland, pastor of a 
Unitarian church and member of the 
Socialist party, and Mrs. Ruth C. 
Penley of Boston's West End. Both 
were carrying placards denouncing 
the showing of the film. The pickets 
represented the trade branch of the 
Boston local of the ^Socialist party. 
Each was released on bail for trial 
this week. 

City and State censors cleared the 
firm. 



STORKS 






West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Chief Petty Officer 
Artie Shaw, USN, now overseas, is 
the father of a son, Steven, born at 
Good Samaritan Hospital. Mother 
is the former Betty Kern, daughter 
of Jerome Kern. 





Warners' 

ACTION IN THE 
NORTH ATLANTIC 
1 Warners' 

MISSION TO MOSCOW 
I "Warners' 

/ EDGE OF DARKNESS 
■ Warners' 
AIR FORCE 
Warners' 
CASABLANCA 
Warners' 
YANKEE DOODLE DANDY 
Warners' 

THE HARD WAY 
Warners' 

NOW, VOYAGER 
Warners' 

GENTLEMAN JIM 
/' Warners' 

GEO. WASHINGTON SLEPT HERE 
Warners' 
ACROSS THE PACIFIC 
Warners' 

DESPERATE JOURNEY 
/^-'Warners' 
BACKGROUND TO DANGER 



vi / I 1/7 






\v) 



^Vv 





L 



yy x > 





Tack L. Warner, Executive Producer 



^^ mm ^ m 



Tuesday, July 6, 1943 



&*\ DAILY 



Warners (hi. Sales 
Meet Opens Thursday 

Second of Warners' regional sales 
meeting gets under way Thursday at 
the Blackstone Hotel, Chicago, in 
the wake of the curtain raiser which 
closed at the Waldorf here on Sat- 
.^-4a y with a hreakfast to the dele- 
^_ p s hosted by Ben Kalmenson, 
iSRes head, and several windup con- 
ferences. 

Friday's session of the local meet- 
ing drew 120, including Warner 
Theaters department execs. On the 
dais, in addition to Kalmenson, were 
Joseph Bernhard, Samuel Schneider, 
Harry M. Kalmine, Mort Blumen- 
stock, Harry Goldberg, Arthur Sach- 
son, Roy Haines, Jules Lapidus, Sam 
E. Morris, Howard Levinson, Nor- 
man H. Moray, A. W. Schwalberg, 
Albert S. Howson. In addition to 
the previous day's delegation, at- 
tendance also included Stuart Aarons, 
H. M. Doherty, Rudy Weiss, Stan- 
ley Hatch, and other theater and 
sales department executives. 

After his introductory remarks. Kalmen- 
son turned the rostrum over to Albert S. 
Howson, Eastern scenario editor and direc- 
tor of censorship, who talked for over three 
hours on the company's inventory of com- 
pleted pictures, those in . production and in 
preparation and story properties held by the 
company for early production. Howson gave 
details of more than 60 stories, all defi- 
nitely scheduled for release in coming: sea- 
sons. 

Joseph Bernhard, who delivered the prin- 
cipal talk on the opening: day, again spoke 
briefly, and there were short addresses by 
Harry M. Kalmine, on exhibition matters: 
Mort Blumenstock, on advertising" and mer- 
chandising" plans: Harry Goldberg", who cited 
the number of pictures with sociological value 
produced regularly by Warners: Samuel 
Schneider, on business matters: Sam E. 
Morris, on general topics: Howard Levin- 
son, on legal aspects of contracts: Arthur 
Sachson, on sales, and others. 

Roy Haines, Jules Lapidus, A. W. 
Schwalberg and Norman H. Moray also held 
group meetings with the salesmen, with Ed 
Hinchey, Mike Dolid, H. M. Doherty and 
Stanley Hatch among the participants. 



M of T Will Introduce 
Black at Buffet Supper 

Howard Black, vice-president of 
Time, Inc., recently designated to 
take charge of M of T sales and dis- 
tribution policies, will be introduced 
to the trade press at an informal 
buffet supper at the Cloud Club in 
the Chrysler Building Thursday. A 
screening of the latest M of T sub- 
ject, "Bill Jack vs. Adolph Hitler," 
will precede the reception. 




Al Wilkie Jay Blaufox 

Don M. Mersereau Frank E. Garbutt 

Sam Lefkowitz 




T T T 

Yes, Sir, a Great Affair! 

• • • IT WAS A GREAT affair We mean New Jersey Allied's 

annual conference last week down at West End, N. I Maybe it 

was because the affair was held far from outside diversions that might 

have attracted the delegates away from the purpose of the sessions 

Anyway, nobody can deny it was one of the biggest and best affairs 

held by the unit thanks to E. Thornton Kelley, Harry Lowenstein 

and others who helped to make it a success A highlight of the 

affair, hitherto un-publicized due to trade paper deadlines at their 
respective presses, was 20th Century-Fox's cocktail party which im- 
mediately preceded the banquet Thursday night 20th-Fox proved 

to be a grand host and the guy who said he didn't enjoy himself wasn't 

there And then there was M-G-M's exhibit — a wagon full of scrap 

metal with a hundred dollar war Bond as the award for the person 

who guessed the total weight And then there was the Walt Dis- 

ney-UA booth which had a complete, exhibit of aircraft models, from 
the first effort of the Wright brothers to those of modern design— all 

in the interest of "Victory Through Air Power" And UA kept the 

convention visitors informed of up-to-the-minute news with a teletype 

which ground out second-by-second records of world events In fact, 

practically every outfit in the business from Newcomer Cinema-Craft up 

to the loftiest major had an interesting exhibit And that "cabaret" 

Wednesday night was flooded with the best talent ever seen at a 
New Jersey Allied convention or a national one for that matter 

▼ ▼ ▼ 

• • • I demonstration of real classy swimming and diving was 
presented Thursday morning in the out-door pool alongside the 

Hollywood Hotel the event being highlighted by somebody 

pushing Bennie Brooks into the water And to get away from 

the social side of the event the boys really got down to work on their 

own problems even at the sacrifice of several good gin rummy 

and poker games While it was obvious that several exhibs. had 

axes to grind, it was unique that not a resolution of condemnation or 
otherwise nor a specific grievance was offered for adoption by the 

respective resolutions and grievance committees Yes, taking it 

all-in-all New Jersey Allied put on a great convention- and show and 
there was some talk about holding future meetings at the same place, 
most of the boys preferring it to the rush-and-push of Atlantic City, 
the former scene of the New Jersey unit's annual get-to-gethers 

T ▼ T 

• • • OF course, it's only natural under the circumstances, but 
that doesn't detract one bit from the Paramount publicity bull's-eye 
scored by the Satevpost in its current issue for Para.'s new short series, 

"Little Lulu" The "Keeping Posted" column is largely devoted to 

Little Lulu's forthcoming film debut and to Little Lulu's pen-and-ink Mom, 

Marge, who introduced the cartoon character in June, 1935 There's 

an unconscious bit of humor, too, in the fact that the "Keeping Posted" 
column this time is spotted alongside the white space for which another 
major company paid heavy dough. . . • Speaking of mags., the July 
12 issue of Life will be given over to Republic's Roy Rogers and the 
inevitable Trigger while the issue's close-up feature will be H. Allen 
Smith's profile of R.R. 

T T T 

• • • AVENGE PEARL HARBOR! 



COmmG and GOIDG 




SPYROS SKOURAS, 20th-Fox prexy, is back 
from studio production conferences. 

HARRY COHN has arrived in New York. 

DAVID ROSE has gone to the Coast. 

F. J. A. McCARTHY, Southern division sales 
manager, returns to the Universal home office 
today from Atlanta following close of his last 
regional meeting there. 

FRED MEYERS, Universal Eastern division man- 
ager, returned from Philadelphia at the week- 
end. 

JUDY GARLAND has arrived in New York. 
This week the star will start on another USO- 
Camp Shows tour. 

MAJ. WILLIAM WYLER is in Hollywood. 

BRETAICNE WINDUST returned to the Coast 
Monday from New York. 

EDWARD C. RAFTERY returned from Holly- 
wood yesterday. 

0. HENRY BRICCS, PRC prexy ARTHUR 
GREENBLATT, sales chief, and NAT L. LEFTON, 
new PRC district manager, leave for the Coast 
on Friday. 

ROUBEN MAMOULIAN has returned to the 
Coast after seven months in New York. 

TOM CONNORS, 20th-Fox distribution head, 
and MAURICE SILVERSTONE, the company's 
foreign chief, have returned from the Coast. 

ROBERT SCHLESS, general foreign manager 
for Warners, is back from a 10-day trip to 
Mexico. 

BILL BRUMBERG and PHIL ENGEL, Warners 
field reps, for the Central and New England 
territories, respectively, returned from New 
York over the week-end. 



Picketing of "Moscow" 
Brings Boston Arrests 

(Continued from Page 1) 

others protested against the show- 
ing of "Mission to Moscow" in Bos- 
ton. Previously the Boston City 
Council had demanded that the film 
be not shown but Mayor Maurice J. 
Tobin overruled this demand and 
permitted the film to open after an 
extensive Warner exploitation cam- 
paign. 

The local film critics Friday 
treated the film very cautiously, 
neither enthusing over it nor con- 
demning it and obviously feeling 
their way. 

Those arrested were the Rev. Vil- 
mar Rose of Rockland, pastor of a 
Unitarian church and member of the 
Socialist party, and Mrs. Ruth C. 
Penley of Boston's West End. Both 
were carrying placards denouncing 
the showing of the film! The pickets 
represented the trade branch of the 
Boston local of the Socialist party. 
Each was released on .hail for trial 
this week. 

City and State censors cleared the 
film. 






STORKS 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Chief Petty Officer 
Artie Shaw, USN, now overseas, is 
the father of a son, Steven, born at 
Good Samaritan Hospital. Mother 
is the former Betty Kern, daughter 
of Jerome Kern. 




<M 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 6, 1943 



Annual Sales Study 
Launched by M-G-M 



{Continued from Page 1) 

sympathetic analysis preparatory to 
the sale of M-G-M's next group of 
pictures. 

"While, of course, attention will 
be given to accounts requiring con- 
sideration because of changing con- 
ditions," Rogers said, "the purpose 
of these sales analyses is to prop- 
erly appraise each individual situa- 
tion so that when a sales approach 
is made it is based on accurate in- 
formation. 

"We are convinced," he continued, 
"that only by individual analysis of 
every one of our accounts can an in- 
telligent sales approach be made and 
our experience of having done this 
for several years has proved that 
point. With our policy of placing the 
responsibility of sales decision with 
our branch and district managers, 
they have found such a scientific 
study of each individual situation 
advantageous to both ourselves and 
our customers." 

The Cincinnati meeting will be at- 
tended by E. K. O'Shea and Jack 
Flynn, Eastern and Western divis- 
ion sales managers, respectively; Ed- 
win W. Aaron, circuit sales man- 
ager; Harold Postman, assistant to 
Rodgers, and E. M. Booth, branch 
manager. It is estimated that about 
three days will be spent in each 
office. 



"Canteen" Biz 35-50% 
Ahead in First 11 Key Runs 

{Continued from Page 1) 

ports to the home office over the 
holiday week-end indicated. United 
Artists' current Sol Lesser release 
is being held for extra playing time 
in each of the 11 spots. 

Among the outstanding grosses 
secured by "Stage Door Canteen"at 
the end of its first week and which 
accounted for the extra playing time 
are the following: at the Loew's 
State, Syracuse, $13,650; State, 
Cleveland, $22,450; Loew's, Canton, 
$11,000; Valentine, Toledo, $11,500; 
Penn, Pittsburgh, $26,700; Loew's 
Richmond, $12,800; Palace, Washing- 
ton, $22,500; Warner-Strand, Hart- 
ford, $10^500; Palace, Cincinnati, 
$20,500; Roger Sherman, New Ha- 
ven, $10,650 and Capitol, Broadway, 
better than $74,000. 



The ... . 

FEMME TOUCH 



MRS. JOSEPHINE COBURN, manager, Esquire, 
Indianapolis. 

LILLIAN MARETZ, RKO, New Haven. 

MRS. T. K. MASINO, manager, Virginia, At- 
lantic City, N. J. 

ETHEL WOLFE, ad sales manager, 2f>th-Fox, 
Chicago. 



WARNERS OBTAIN $15,000,000 LOAN 

Brings to $23,000,000 Fund to Retire Domestic Bank Loans, 
Debentures and Preferred Stock 



(Continued from Page 1) 



off total $5,500,000. The debentures, 
of the series due in 1948, are listed 
in the principal amount of $10,139,- 
500. The preferred shares outstand- 
ing number 99,397. 

The debentures have been called 
for payment at 100% and accrued 
interest on Aug. 2, 1943, but holders 
may obtain payment in full at any 
time, according to a company an- 
nouncement. The preferred stock 
has been called for redemption on 
Sept. 1, 1943, at $89.65 per share. 
At one time there were outstanding 
$42,900,500 principal amount of six 
per cent debentures and 785,604 
shares of preferred stock. 

Commitments have been entered 
into by the company for the private 
sale on or before Sept. 15, 1943, of 
$8,000,000 principal amount of four 
per cent serial debentures maturing 
semi-annually from Dec. 1, 1949, 
through June 1, 1953. 

The loans were obtained from the 
First National Bank of Boston, the 



New York Trust Co., the Guaranty 
Trust Co. of New York, the Conti- 
nental Illinois National Bank and 
Trust Co. of Chicago, the Pennsyl- 
vania Co. for Insurances on Lives 
and Granting Annuities of Philadel- 
phia and the Union Trust Co. of 
Pittsburgh. 

With the retirement of the pre- 
ferred stock the outstanding capital 
stock of the company will consist 
solely of 3,701,090 shares of common 
after Sept. 1, 1943. This means the 
voting control will return to the 
common stock. According to reports 
to the Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission, members of the Warner 
family have made large purchases 
of the common in recent months. 

The new financing arrangements 
have the effect of greatly simplifying 
the capital structure of Warner 
Bros. They also will heavily reduce 
the company's debt. The refunding 
operations are expected to result in 
tax savings, for the firm. 



War Short a Week 
If Pk Bureau Ends 



(Continued from Page 1) 

of the WAC at the Hotel Warwick 
on Friday. The session was in the 
form of an informal discussion with 
no concrete proposal adopted official- 
ly. Formal action will not be taken 
until the OWI situation has been 
straightened out or clarified. 

Despite the apparent abolition of 
its film bureau, it appears certain 
that one war short will be released 
weekly to the theaters. This was 
promised by Arthur Mayer, of the 
WAC, at the New Jersey Allied 
conference in West End on Thurs- 
day. Nevertheless, industry lead- 
ers admittedly are concerned over 
the situation and will continue to 
seek a solution. 

Attending Friday's luncheon meet- 
ing were W. F. Rodgers, chairman; 
Abe Montague, Neil F. Agnew, Paul 
Lazarus, Sr., William Kupper, Wil- 
liam Scully, Herman Gluckman, 
Francis S. Harmon and H. M. 
Richey. 



Selznick Borrows Robert Walker 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — David O. Selznick has 
borrowed Robert Walker from M-G- 
M to play Corporal Tom Smollett in 
"Since You Went Away" whose 
sweetheart will be enacted by Jen- 
nifer Jones, Mrs. Walker in real 
life. 



Luncheon Today for Young 

RKO Radio is holding a trade press 
luncheon in the Jensen suite at the 
Waldorf-Astoria today to introduce 
James R. Young, author of "Behind 
the Rising Sun," which the company 



Employes of OWI Pic 
Bureau Given Notice 



(Continued from Page 1) 

would not reveal, but production and 
16 mm. distribution are definitely 
out. 

Mellett is hopeful that some of 
these terminations may be called 
back when OWI Director Elmer Da- 
vis finally decides how to allocate 
the funds available to his agency, 
but there is no assurance that this 
will be the case. Davis made it plain 
over two weeks ago that he is now 
mainly concerned with the fate of 
the motion picture bureau. 



Davis Orders Hollywood 
OWI Film Bureau Closed 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Nelson Poynter, Hol- 
lywood director of OWI's motion pic- 
ture bureau, who has been ordered 
by Elmer Davis to close shop here, 
will leave soon for Washington, D. 
C, via Mexico City. He plans to 
maintain residence in Washington 
and St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Poynter's assistant, Warren Pierce, 
plans to join the Navy and is anx- 
ious to get into the combat intelli- 
gence service. 



William Murray Dead 

Grand Rapids, Mich. — William 
Murray, 46, co-owner of the Savoy 
Theater here, died in St. Mary's 
Hospital after a long illness. He 
was a member of Detroit Variety 
Club, Knights of Columbus and 
Grand Rapids Peninsular Club. Sur- 
viving are a daughter, Mary Ellen, 
his mother, four sisters and two 
brothers. 



IN NEW POSTS 



RALPH MANN, manager, Strand, Montgomery. 

Ala. 
CORDON PYLE, assistant manager, Parker's 

Broadway, Portland. 
BOB BURKHARDT, Vic Shapiro and Staff, Hoi 

lywood. 
LESTER COLE, associate manager, Paramount 

Theater, New Haven. 
)OE ROBINSON, chief of service, ff Vunt 

Theater, New Haven. \_^r 

TOM DUNPHY, assistant manager, Majestic 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
DENNIS SULLIVAN, assistant manager, Durfee 

Fall River, Mass. 
RICHARD BUZZELL, assistant manager, Colonial, 

Haverhill, Mass. 
JOSEPH BOUCHER, chief of staff, Capitol 

New Bedford, Mass. 
TOM KIVLAN, student assistant manager, Elm 

St. Theater, Worcester, Mass. 
R. A. BIRD, manager, Rockingham, Bellows 

Falls, Vt. 
HYMIE BLOOM, manager, Claremont (formerly 

Annex), E. 74th St., New York. 
SID NEWMAN, manager, Franklin, Nutley, N. J 
ROBERT CLARK, manager, Garden, Paterson 

N. J. 
JACK HECARTY, manager, Central, Newark, 

N. J. 
DAVID BEEHLER, manager, Capitol, Belleville, ■ 

N. j. 
MORT BRATTER, manager, Millburn Theater, 

Millburn, N. J. 
ERNEST CROUCH, manager, Dixie, Rochester, 

N. Y. 
NEILL HENRY, manager, Liberty, Rochester, 

N. Y. 
GEOKCE CALDWELL, manager, Grand, Wilming- 
ton, Del. 
WILLIAM HUFFMAN, manager, Warner, At- 
lantic City, N. J. 

;AMES RICCEY, manager, Stanley, Atlantic 
City, N. J. 






Omaha Curfew Ordinance 
Aimed at Juve Vandalism 



(Continued from Page 1) 

sen introduced the ordinance which 
carries penalties from $1 to $100 for 
each conviction and jail sentence if 
fines remain unpaid. 

Jepsen said he believed the ordi- 
nance would give police a means of 
curbing juvenile vandalism which has 
increased at a tremendous rate dur- 
ing recent months. First-run theater 
owners began combatting the prob- 
lem several weeks ago when they 
announced they would no longer sell 
tickets to children under 15 unless 
they were accompanied by an adult. 

Omaha has been without a curfew 
since 1941, when a 60-year-old 
statute was finally removed from the 
books. 



i 

I 



Jewish Theatrical Guild 
To Name Cantor Prexy 

The nominating committee of the- 
Jewish Theatrical Guild of America* 
has nominated the following mem-j 
bers to hold office for the next year: 
Eddie Cantor, president; George Jes- 
sel, Ben Bernie, Jack Pearl, Fred 
Block and William Morris, Jr., vice- 
presidents; Sam Forrest, financial! 
secretary; Dr. Leo Michel, chairmani 
of relief, and Dave Ferguson, execu- 
tive secretary. 




AN IMPORTANT CAST IN THE MOST VALUABLE ROMANTIC PROPERTY SCREENED THIS SEASON! 



Si CHARLES pJOAI 

1 i i 1/ n 1/ it ■ '■ /a 

^ s 3 SB ■ M^fe. 

17 i/ijjii 



.flea 






de^i 




DAILY 



T 
Tuesday, July 6, 19431= 



Annual Sales Study 
Launched by M-G-M 



{Continued from Page 1) 

sympathetic analysis preparatory to 
the sale of M-G-M's next group of 
pictures. 

"While, of course, attention will 
be given to accounts requiring con- 
sideration because of changing con- 
ditions," Rogers said, "the purpose 
of these sales analyses is to prop- 
erly appraise each individual situa- 
tion so that when a sales approach 
is made it is based on accurate in- 
formation. 

"We are convinced," he continued, 
"that only by individual analysis of 
every one of our accounts can an in- 
telligent sales approach be made and 
our experience of having done this 
for several years has proved that 
point. With our policy of placing the 
responsibility of sales decision with 
our branch and district managers, 
they have found such a scientific 
study of each individual situation 
advantageous to both ourselves and 
our customers." 

The Cincinnati meeting will be at- 
tended by E. K. O'Shea and Jack 
Flynn, Eastern and Western divis- 
ion sales managers, respectively; Ed- 
win W. Aaron, circuit sales man- 
ager; Harold Postman, assistant to 
Rodgers, and E. M. Booth, branch 
manager. It is estimated that about 
three days will be spent in each 
office. 



"Canteen" Biz 35-50% 
Ahead in First 11 Key Runs 

{Continued from Page 1) 
ports to the home office over the 
holiday week-end indicated. United 
Artists' current Sol Lesser release 
is being held for extra playing time 
in each of the 11 spots. . 

Among the outstanding grosses 
secured by "Stage Door Canteen" at 
the end of its first week and which 
accounted for the extra playing time 
are the following: at the Loew's 
State, Syracuse, $13,650; State, 
Cleveland, $22,450; Loew's, Canton, 
$11,000; Valentine, Toledo, $11,500; 
Penn, Pittsburgh, $26,700; Loew's 
Richmond, $12,800; Palace, Washing- 
ton, $22,500; Warner-Strand, Hart- 
ford, $10,500; Palace, Cincinnati, 
$20,500; Roger Sherman, New Ha- 
ven, $10,650 and Capitol, Broadway, 
better than $74,000. 



The ... . 

FEMME TOUCH 



MRS. JOSEPHINE COBURN, manager, Esquire, 
Indianapolis. 

LILLIAN MARETZ, RKO, New Haven. 

MRS. T. K. MASINO, manager, Virginia, At- 
lantic City, <N. J. 

ETHEL WOLFE, ad sales manager, 20th-Fox, 
Chicago. 



WARNERS OBTAIN $15,000,000 LOAN 

Brings to $23,000,000 Fund to Retire Domestic Bank Loans, 
Debentures and Preferred Stock 



{Continued from Page 1) 



off total $5,500,000. The debentures, 
of the series due in 1948, are listed 
in the principal amount of $10,139,- 
500. The preferred shares outstand- 
ing number 99,397. 

The debentures have been called 
for payment at 100% and accrued 
interest on Aug. 2, 1943, but holders 
may obtain payment in full at any 
time, according to a company an- 
nouncement. The preferred stock 
has been called for redemption on 
Sept. 1, 1943, at $89.65 per share. 
At one time there were outstanding 
$42,900,500 principal amount of six 
per cent debentures and 785,604 
shares of preferred stock. 

Commitments have been entered 
into by the company for the private 
sale on or before Sept. 15, 1943, of 
$8,000,000 principal amount of four 
per cent serial debentures maturing 
semi-annually from Dec. 1, 1949, 
through June 1, 1953.. 

The loans were obtained from the 
First National Bank c ^ Boston, the 



New York Trust Co., the Guaranty 
Trust Co. of New York, the Conti- 
nental Illinois National Bank and 
Trust Co. of Chicago, the Pennsyl- 
vania Co. for Insurances on Lives 
and Granting Annuities of Philadel- 
phia and the Union Trust Co. of 
Pittsburgh. 

With the retirement of the pre- 
ferred stock the outstanding capital 
stock of the company will consist 
solely of 3,701,090 shares of common 
after Sept. 1, 1943. This means the 
voting control will return to the 
common stock. According to reports 
to the Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission, members of the Warner 
family have made large purchases 
of the common in recent months. 

The new financing arrangements 
have the effect of greatly simplifying 
the capital structure of Warner 
Bros. They also will heavily reduce 
the company's debt. The refunding 
operations are expected to result in 
tax savings for the firm. 



War Short a Week 
If Pic Bureau Ends 



{Continued from Page 1) 

of the WAC at the Hotel Warwick 
on Friday. The session was in the 
form of an informal discussion with 
no concrete proposal adopted official- 
ly. Formal action will not be taken 
until the OWI situation has been 
straightened out or clarified. 

Despite the apparent abolition of 
its film bureau, it appears certain 
that one war short will be released 
weekly to the theaters. This was 
promised by Arthur Mayer, of the 
WAC, at the New Jersey Allied 
conference in West End on Thurs- 
day. Nevertheless, industry lead- 
ers admittedly are concerned over 
the situation and will continue to 
seek a solution. 

Attending Friday's luncheon meet- 
ing were W. F. Rodgers, chairman; 
Abe Montague, Neil F. Agnew, Paul 
Lazarus, Sr., William Kupper, Wil- 
liam Scully, Herman Gluckman, 
Francis S. Harmon and H. M. 
Richey. 



Selznick Borrows Robert Walker 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — David O. Selznick has 
borrowed Robert Walker from M-G- 
M to play Corporal Tom Smollett in 
"Since You Went Away" whose 
sweetheart will be enacted by Jen- 
nifer Jones, Mrs. Walker in real 
life. 



Luncheon Today for Young 

RKO Radio is holding a trade press 
luncheon in the Jensen suite at the 
Waldorf-Astoria to ^y to introduce 
James R. Young, a or of "Behind 
the Rising Sun," w *:he company 



Employes of OWI Pic 
Bureau Given Notice 



{Continued from Page 1) 

would not reveal, but production and 
16 mm. distribution are definitely 
out. 

Mellett is hopeful that some of 
these terminations may be called 
back when OWI Director Elmer Da- 
vis finally decides how to allocate 
the funds available to his agency, 
but there is no assurance that this 
will be the case. Davis made it plain 
over two weeks ago that he is now 
mainly concerned with the fate of 
the motion picture bureau. 



Davis Orders Hollywood 
OWI Film Bureau Closed 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Nelson Poynter, Hol- 
lywood director of OWI's motion pic- 
ture bureau, who has been ordered 
by Elmer Davis to close shop here, 
will leave soon for Washington, D. 
C, via Mexico City. He plans to 
maintain residence in Washington 
and St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Poynter's assistant, Warren Pierce, 
plans to join the Navy and is anx- 
ious to get into the combat intelli- 
gence service. 



William Murray Dead 

Grand Rapids, Mich. — William 
Murray, 46, co-owner of the Savoy 
Theater here, died in St. Mary's 
Hospital after a long illness. He 
was a member of Detroit Variety 
Club, Knights of Columbus and 
Grand Rapids Peninsular Club. Sur- 
viving are a daughter, Mary Ellen, 
his mother, four sisters and two 
brothers. 



IN NEW POSTS 



RALPH MANN, manager, Strand, Montgomery 

Ala. 
GORDON PYLE, assistant manager, Parker' 

Broadway, Portland. 
BOB BURKHARDT, Vic Shapiro and Staff, Hoi 

lywood. 
LESTER COLE, associate manager, Paramoun 

Theater, New Haven. 
JOE ROBINSON, chief of service, [ \soun 

Theater, New Haven. \ / 

TOM DUNPHY, assistant manager, Majestic 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
DENNIS SULLIVAN, assistant manager, Durfec 

Fall River, Mass. 
RICHARD BUZZELL, assistant manager, Colonial 

Haverhill, Mass. 
JOSEPH BOUCHER, chief of staff, Capitol 

New Bedford, Mass. 
TOM KIVLAN, student assistant manager, El.- ■ 

St. Theater, Worcester, Mass. 
R. A. BIRD, manager, Rockingham, Bellow (i 

Falls, Vt. 
HYMIE BLOOM, manager, Claremont (former! r 

Annex), E. 74th St., New York. 
SID NEWMAN, manager, Franklin, Nutley, N. ] 
ROBERT CLARK, manager, Garden, Patersor 

N. J. 
JACK HECARTY, manager, Central, Newark 

N. J. 
OAVID BEEHLER, manager, Capitol, Belleville 

N. J. 
MORT BRATTER, manager, Millburn Theatei 

Millburn, N. J. 
ERNEST CROUCH, manager, Dixie, Rochesteii 

N. Y. 
NEILL HENRY, manager, Liberty, Rochestei 

N. Y. 
CEOKCE CALDWELL, manager, Crand, Wilming 

ton, Del. 
WILLIAM HUFFMAN, manager, Warner, Al 

lantic City, N. J. 

JAMES RICCEY, manager, Stanley, Atlant 
City, N. J. 



Omaha Curfew Ordinance 
Aimed at Juve Vandalism 



{Continued from Page 1) 

sen introduced the ordinance whic 
carries penalties from $1 to $100 fo 
each conviction and jail sentence i 
fines remain unpaid. 
• Jepsen said he believed the ord 
nance would give police a means c 
curbing juvenile vandalism which ha 
increased at a tremendous rate dm 
ing recent months. First-run theate 
owners began combatting the pro! 
lem several weeks ago when the 
announced they would no longer se 
tickets to children under 15 unles 
they were accompanied by an adul 
Omaha has been without a curfe 
since 1941, when a 60-year-ol 
statute was finally removed from tl 
books. 



Jewish Theatrical Guild 
To Name Cantor Prexy 

The nominating committee of tl 
Jewish Theatrical Guild of Ameri<j 
has nominated the following men 
bers to hold office for the next yea 
Eddie Cantor, president; George Je 
sel, Ben Bernie, Jack Pearl, Fr< 
Block and William Morris, Jr., vie 
presidents; Sam Forrest, financi 
secretary; Dr. Leo Michel, chairm; 
of relief, and Dave Ferguson, exec 
tive secretary. 



Tuesday, July 6, 1943 



3:= 



&S* 



DAILY 



teflon PRC Central 
district Manager 



(Continued from Page 1) 

t| and and Cincinnati franchises of 
MtC on March 29, formerly was the 
Republic franchise holder for the 
:ame territories. 
PRC's first special for the new 
,,;e a--r— t. "Isle of Forgotten Sins," 
vil. "7 given an "all-out" exploita- 
- ;ion""campaign which is said to be 
;he most ambitious ever attempted 
*>y an unaffiliated company. It was 
stated that 24-sheets will be made 
'ran all of the company's specials and 
Victory specials on the new program. 
In giving a resume of the ad- 
vancement in production values since 
i Leon Fromkess became production 
•nhief, Greenblatt stressed that "tim- 
ing is the secret of PRC's progress." 
iauest speakers included William 
J Rowland, producer of "Follies Girl," 
'and Jerry Edwards, attorney for the 
Company. 

i It was learned that a deal for a 
million dollar loan, to be used for 
j production and expansion, was com- 
pleted on Friday. 

f Members of the trade press were 
special guests at a luncheon which 
ffollowed adjournment of the sales 
meeting. 



Exhibs. Watching Tax Effects 

Pay-As-You-Go Plan Stirs B. O. Fears 



(Continued from Page 1) 



national income so often mentioned 
in Washington, and who will pay 
higher taxes than heretofore. 

Whether the higher salary brack- 
ets, plus war workers drawing bet- 
ter than usual wages, will enable box- 
offices to hold up is a question that 
cannot be answered until after the 
coming week-end. The heavy Inde- 
pendence Day "take" is not consid- 
ered a barometer as the initial bite 
is taken from salaries for the week 
beginning last Sunday. 

Despite the wiping out of some 
$6,533,000,000 in present tax liabili- 
ties, Treasury statisticians estimate 
that new collection method will yield 



$3,600,000,000 more in the fiscal year 
1944 and $1,094,000,000 more in 1945 
than the former tax law would have 
brought in. Government withhold- 
ing schedules do not give immediate 
consideration to deductions formerly 
allowed on tax reports, and while 
some of these probably will be al- 
lowed on the final computations, the 
tax will be collected weekly and ad- 
justments put off until early in 1944. 
This, tied in with the admittedly 
rising cost of living, particularly 
food, makes exhibs. wonder whether 
a fair percentage of patrons will re- 
duce their movie going in an effort 
to keep up with more essential bills. 



Loew to Administrate 
Eastate of Harry Asher 



Boston — E. M. Loew has been 
named an administrator of the es- 
tate of the late Harry Asher, who 
lost his life in the Cocoanut Grove 
fire last November. Loew replaces 
Edward M. Morey who has left Bos- 
ton. Administrators for the Asher 
estate now consist of Loew, Ben G. 
Gilbert, film attorney and Harry 
"Zippy" Goldman. 



Small May Do a Film 
On Chi. Maternity Center 

Hollywood — Edward Small is seri- 
ously considering producing a fea- 
ture-length film on "The Chicago 
Maternity Center," one of the most 
unusual institutions of its kind in 
America. It was founded some 30 
years ago by Dr. Joseph Boliver de 
Lee, considrjed generally the most 
outstanding obstetrician of the pres- 
ent generation. 



HCLLyWCCD 
DIGEJT 



SIGNED 

ROBERT ELWYN, shorts director, M-C-M. 
DOUGLAS MORROW, termer, M-C-M. 
TONY DEVLIN, termer, Edward Small. 
RENEE WHITE, termer, Jack Schwarz-PRC. 



ASSIGNMENTS 



"Atlantic City," Republic, 
editor, "Tiger Fangs," 



ALBERT J. COHEN, 

GEORGE MERRICK, 
PRC 

ENSIGN HAROLD F. DIXON, USN, technical ad- 
visor, "The Raft," Edward Small-UA. 



CASTINGS 

JOAN CRAWFORD, "Night Shift," Warners; 
PAT O'BRIEN, "Pile Buck," Columbia; ROBERT 
DONAT, "If Winter Comes," M-G-M; DALE 
EVANS, "Three Little Sisters, "Republic; MARY 
ANN HYDE, "Up in Arms," Samuel Goldwyn; 
FORTUNIO BONANOVA, "AM Baba and the 
Forty Thieves," Universal; TONY DELVIN, "The 
Raft," Edward Small. 
LESTER MATTHEWS, "The Story of Dr. Was- 

sell," Paramount; SHELDON LEONARD, 

"Timber Queen," Paramount. 

STORY PURCHASES 

ALICE MEANS REEVE'S "Johnny Doesn't Live 
Here Any More," Kings Bros. -Monogram. 

• 

SCHEDULED 

"Duchess of Broadway," author-producer, E. H. 
KLEIN ERT, Monogram. 






TWO SMASH COMEftY HITS FROM COLUMBIA! 





THE 3 STOOGES 



Curly . . . Larry . . . Moe 
in "THREE LITTLE TWIRPS" 







<ft 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 6, 194 



Warner Studio to Maintain Capacity Production 



Company to be Prepared 
For Changing Conditions, 
Declares Ben Kalmenson 



{Continued from Page 1) 

exact number of features to be re- 
leased, Kalmenson said, with the stu- 
dio maintaining capacity production 
in order to be prepared for any 
changes in present conditions. Final 
releases for 1942-43 will be "The 
Constant Nymph," starring Charles 
Boyer, Joan Fontaine and Alexis 
Smith; Irving Berlin's "This Is the 
Army," and "Background to Dan- 
ger," starring George Raft and Syd- 
ney Greenstreet with Brenda Mar- 
shall and Peter Lorre. 

Among Early Releases 
Early releases on the new sched- 
ule will include the following com- 
pleted films, not necessarily in order 
of release: "Watch on the Rhine," 
starring Bette Davis and Paul Lu- 
kas in the prize-winning Broadway 
play; "Thank Your Lucky Stars," 
with Humphrey Bogart, Eddie Can- 
tor, Bette Davis, Olivia de Havilland, 
Errol Flynn, John Garfield, Joan 
Leslie, Ida Lupino, Dennis Morgan, 
Ann Sheridan, Dinah Shore, Alexis 
Smith, Jack Carson, Alan Hale, Ed- 
ward Everett Horton, S. Z. Sakall, 
Hattie McDaniel, Willie Best, Ruth 
Donnelly, Don Wilson, Henry Ar- 
metta, Noble Johnson, Spike Jones 
and his City Slickers. 

Also, "Old Acquaintance." from the stage 
hit. with Bette Davis, Miriam Hopkins, John 
Loder and Gig Young: "Princess O'Rourke," 
with Olivia de Havilland, Robert Cummings, 
Charles Coburn and Jane Wyman: "The Desert 
Song," with Dennis Morgan, Irene Manning, 
Bruce Cabot, Lynne Overman and Gene Lock- 
hart; "Devotion," with Olivia de Havilland, 
Ida Lupino, Nancy Coleman, Paul Henreid 
and Sydney Greenstreet, based on the life 
of the Bronte Sisters; "Saratoga Trunk," 
with Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman, from 
Edna Ferber's best-seller; "Arsenic and Old 
Lace," from the stage hit, with Cary Grant, 
Priscilla Lane, Raymond Massey, Peter Lorre 
and Edward Everett Horton, and "The Ad- 
ventures of Mark Twain," starring Fredrie 
March and Alexis Smith. 

To Be Ready for Season 

In production and scheduled to be com- 
pleted by the start of the new season are: 
"Northern Pursuit," starring Errol Flynn 
and Julie Bishop, with Helmut Dantine and 
Gene Lockhart; "Destination Tokyo," with 
Cary Grant, John Garfield and Alan Hale; 
"Conflict," with Humphrey Bogart, Alexis 
Smith, Sydney Greenstreet, and Rose Hobart. 

Also, "In Our Time," from Robert St. 
John's book, with Ida Lupino, Paul Henreid, 
Nancy Coleman, Nazimova, Mary Boland and 
Morris Carnovsky; "Shine On Harvest Moon," 
musical based on the life of Nora Bayes, 
with Ann Sheridan, Dennis Morgan, Jack 
Carson and Irene Manning. 

A group of Victory Pictures including 
"Adventures in Iraq," "Murder on the Water- 
front," "Crime by Night," "The Last Ride" 
and "Find the Blackmailer" are also ready 
for release. 

On Shooting Schedule 

Among features scheduled for early shoot- 
ing are "Battle Cry," a Howard Hawks pro- 
duction; "Passage to Marseille," follow up 
to "Casablanca": "The Horn Blows at Mid- 
night." with Jack Benny: "Rhapsody in 
Blue," based on the life of George Gersh- 
win; "Mr. Skeffington," starring Bette Davis 
"Uncertain Glory," starring Errol Flynn 
"The Gay Blades," "Here Come the Girls,' 
musical with Ann Sheridan, Ida Lupino, 
Alexis Smith and Jane Wyman, and "Three 
Strangers," John Huston original, starring 
George Brent. 

Stage play properties scheduled for fu- 
ture production include 'The Doughgirls," 
"Dark Eyes," 'The Corn is Green." "Janie," 



TO THE COLORS! 



* COMMISSIONED * 

RICHARD DUBE, business manager of 20th-Fox 
publicity and advertising department, ensign 
Naval Reserve. 

* PROMOTED -jr 

|OHN SILVETWATCH, USA, former manager, 
Strand, Clinton, Mass., to corporal. 

* TO OFFICERS~~SCHOOLS * 

FRANKLIN FERGUSON, USA, former manager, 
Whitney, New Haven. 

* ARMY * 

MICKEY NUNES, chief of service, Paramount 

Theater, New Haven. 
PETER DE FAZIO, salesman, Warners, New 

Haven. 
ROBERT MERRILL, Strand, Hartford, Conn. 
WALTER CORREA, assistant manager, Durfee, 

Fall River, Mass. 



JOSEPH MCCARTHY, Colonial, Gloucester, 
Mass. 

WILLIAM HUMPHRIES, Jr., son of the 20th-Fox 
salesman, Philadelphia. 

WILLIAM KANEFSKY, Earle Theater, Philadel- 
phia. 

— • — 

* NAVY * 

WILLIAM KARENCHUK, booker, FRC, New 
Haven. 

— • — 

* MARINE CORPS * 

DANNY FISCHER, Stanley-Warner, Philadel- 
phia. 

-• — 

* ARMY AIR FORCE * 

RALPH COLLENCELLO, Loew's Poli, Hartford, 
Conn. 



Pinks "Last Will of Dr. Mabuse" 
Chicago — Police censors here in 
June pinked but one film, "The 
Last Will of Dr. Mabuse," out of 
73 films — 298,000 feet — inspected 
Eleven cuts wei'e made, but no pic- 
ture was rejected. 



"Ethan Frome," "Brooklyn, U. S. A.," "Dad- 
dies." "The Animal Kingdom,", and Ibsen's 
"Pillars of Society." 

Book properties scheduled include "Night 
Shift," by Maritta Wolf, starring Joan 
Crawford; "Country Lawyer," by Bellamy 
Partridge; "Green Eyes," new Sinclair Lewis 
novel; "Mississippi Belle," by Clements Rip- 
ley, to be made into a musical with Cole 
Porter music; "The Time Between," by 
Gale Wilhelm: "The Conspirators," by Fred- 
rie Prokosch; "Nobody Lives Forever," by 
W. R. Burnett: "Danger Signal," by Phyllis 
Bottome and "Happiness," by Mildred Cram. 

Other Warner properties include "Singing 
in the Wilderness," story of John James 
Audubon; "Misunderstood," by Lili Hat- 
vany, to be produced by Robert Buckner, 
starring Bette Davis; "Treasure of the Sierra 
Madre," "Will Rogers," "The Widow Wouldn't 
Weep," "God is My Co-Pilot," by Robert 
Lee Scott; "Al Schmid, War Hero," "Life of 
Marilyn Miller," "Humoresque," "George, 
the Devil and Rosie," "Deep Valley" and 
"Broken Journey," play by Andrew Rosen- 
thal. 

Roster of 1943-14 Talent 

Warners' contract list of stars and fea- 
tured players includes Humphrey Bogart. 
George Brent, Nancy Coleman, Joan Crawford, 
Bette Davis, Olivia de Havilland, Geraldine 
Fitzgerald, Errol Flynn, John Garfield, Syd- 
ney Greenstreet, Paul Henried, Walter Hus- 
ton, Priscilla Lane, Joan Leslie, Ida Lupino, 
Irene Manning, Dennis Morgan, Ann Sheri- 
dan, Alexis Smith, Julie Bishop, Jack Car- 
son, Dane Clark, Helmut Dantine, Faye 
Emerson, Victor Francen, Alan Hale, Gene 
Lockhart, John Loder, Hattie McDaniel, Do- 
lores Moran. Eleanor Parker, Claude Rains, 
Joyce Reynolds, John Ridgely, S. Z. Sakall, 
George Tobias and Jane Wyman. 

Additional artists engaged for special pic 
tures include Gary Cooper, Eddie Cantor. 
Dinah Shore, Cary Grant, Ingrid Bergman. 
Edward Everett Horton, Flora Robson, Mir- 
iam Hopkins, Peter Lorre, George Murphy. 
Charles Butterworth, Una Merkel, Dolores 
Costello, Robert Cummings, Charles Coburn, 
Fredrie March, Donald Crisp, C. Aubrey 
Smith and John Carradine. 

Directors include Michael Curtiz, Lewis 
Milestone, Raoul Walsh, Herman Shumlin, 
Edmund Goulding, Irving Rapper, David 
Butler, Curtis Bernhardt, Edward Blatt, 
Delmar Daves, Vincent Sherman, B. Reaves 
Eason, Leroy Prinz, Jean Negulesco and 
Peter Godfrey. 

Producers include Hal B. Wallis, Jesse L. 
Lasky, Jerry Wald, Mark Hellinger, Henry 
Blanke, Robert Buckner, Jack Chertok, Wil- 
liam Jacobs, Julius J. Epstein, Philip G. 
Epstein and Gordon Hollingshead, in addi- 
tion to Howard Hawks, who will make 
"Battle Cry." 



Stone's Second for UA a Musical 

Andrew Stone and Frederick Jack- 
son will produce a second feature for 
United Artists release, having com- 
pleted, their first, "Hi Diddle Diddle." 
The latter will be released this month. 
New production will be a musical, 
slated to include specialty numbers 
and "name" bands. Casting begins 
this week. 



Tl= 



Is: 



RKO, Disney Add Yeat 
To Releasing Pad 

(.Continued from Page 1) 

Disney's seventh group of shorts an 
carries an option for the dQ nu - 
tion of the eighth group. Adcrrtion- 
ally, there will be the Disney fea- 
ture previously announced as "Sur- 
prise Package" and currently titled 
tentatively as "Let's Go Latin," which 
will introduce a revolutionary tech- 
nical process invented by the Disney 
studio. This feature, as well as the 
18 shorts, will be in Technicolor. 

RKO has distributed the Disney 
product for seven seasons, the first 
contract having been signed in 
March, 1936. 



McGrann Joins Agency 

Frank McGrann, a former ex-' 
ploitation director for Columbia Pic- 
tures, will go into the employment 
agency business today when he 
will inaugurate a radio and motion 
picture division for the Position Se- 
curing Bureau, Inc. He will make 
his offices at the midtown branch of 
the agency. 



< ** a '*'** ai<awi '' i ''' w»»»awiM«ii» ^^ 




|t Tuesday, July 6, 1943 



DAILY 



Lellon PRC Central 
District Manager 



(Continued from Page 1) 

and and Cincinnati franchises of 
PRC on March 29, formerly was the 
Republic franchise holder for the 
same territories. 

PRC's first special for the new 
spa y- -f. "Isle of Forgotten Sins," 
«riir" i - — given an "all-out" exploita- 
;ion^ampaign which is said to be 
;he most ambitious ever attempted 
jy an unaffiliated company. It was 
stated that 24-sheets will be made 
m all of the company's specials and 
Victory specials on the new program. 

In giving a resume of the ad- 
vancement in production values since 
Leon Fromkess became production 
:hief, Greenblatt stressed that "tim- 
ng is the secret of PRC's progress." 
juest speakers included William 
Rowland, producer of "Follies Girl," 
ind Jerry Edwards, attorney for the 
company. 

It was learned that a deal for a 
Million dollar loan, to be used for 
production and expansion, was com- 
pleted on Friday. 

, Members of the trade press were 
special guests at a luncheon which 
followed adjournment of the sales 
neeting. 



Exhibs. Watching Tax Effects 

Pay- As- You -Go Plan Stirs B. O. Fears 



(Continued from Page 1) 



national income so often mentioned 
in Washington, and who will pay 
higher taxes than heretofore. 

Whether the higher salary brack- 
ets, plus war workers drawing bet- 
ter than usual wages, will enable box- 
offices to hold up is a question that 
cannot be answered until after the 
coming week-end. The heavy Inde- 
pendence Day "take" is not consid- 
ered a barometer as the initial bite 
is taken from salaries for the week 
beginning last Sunday. 

Despite the wiping out of some 
$6,533,000,000 in present tax liabili- 
ties, Treasury statisticians estimate 
that new collection method will yield 



$3,600,000,000 more in the fiscal year 
1944 and $1,094,000,000 more in 1945 
than the former tax law would have 
brought in. Government withhold- 
ing schedules do not give immediate 
consideration to deductions formerly 
allowed on tax reports, and while 
some of these probably will be al- 
lowed on the final computations, the 
tax will be collected weekly and ad- 
justments put off until early in 1944. 
This, tied in with the admittedly 
rising cost of living, particularly 
food, makes exhibs. wonder whether 
a fair percentage of patrons will re- 
duce their movie going in an effort 
to keep up with more essential bills. 



Loew to Administrate 
Eastate of Harry Asher 



Boston — E. M. Loew has been 
named an administrator of the es- 
tate of the late Harry Asher, who 
lost his life in the Cocoanut Grove 
fire last November. Loew replaces 
Edward M. Morey who has left Bos- 
ton. Administrators for the Asher 
estate now consist of Loew, Ben G. 
Gilbert, film attorney and Harry 
"Zippy" Goldman. 



Small May Do a Film 
On Chi. Maternity Center 

Hollywood — Edward Small is seri- 
ously considering producing a fea- 
ture-length film on "The Chicago 
Maternity Center," one of the most 
unusual institutions of its kind in 
America. It was founded some 30 
years ago by Dr. Joseph Boliver de 
Lee, considered generally the most 
outstanding obstetrician of the pres- 
ent generation. 



HCLLy^CCD 
DIGEXT 



SIGNED 

ROBERT ELWYN, shorts director, M-C-M. 
DOUGLAS MORROW, termer, M-C-M. 
TONY DEVLIN, termer, Edward Small. 
RENEE WHITE, termer, Jack Schwarz-PRC. 



ASSIGNMENTS 

ALBERT J. COHEN, "Atlantic City," Republic. 

GEORGE MERRICK, editor, "Tiger Fangs," 
PRC 

ENSIGN HAROLD F. DIXON, USN, technical ad- 
visor, "The Raft," Edward Small-UA. 



CASTINGS 

JOAN CRAWFORD, "Night Shift," Warners; 
PAT O'BRIEN, "Pile Buck," Columbia; ROBERT 
DONAT, "If Winter Comes," M-G-M; DALE 
EVANS, "Three Little Sisters, "Republic; MARY 
ANN HYDE, "Up in Arms," Samuel Coldwyn; 
FORTUNIO BONANOVA, "AM Baba and the 
Forty Thieves," Universal; TONY DELVIN, "The 
Raft," Edward Small. 
LESTER MATTHEWS, "The Story of Dr. Was- 

sell," Paramount; SHELDON LEONARD, 

"Timber Queen," Paramount. 

STORY PURCHASES 

ALICE MEANS REEVE'S "Johnny Doesn't Live 
Here Any More," Kings Bros. -Monogram. 

• 

SCHEDULED 

"Duchess of Broadway," author-producer, E. H. 
KLEINERT, Monogram. 



TWO SMASH COMEftY HITS FROM COLUMBIA! 



v* 




i % 



±>®m 



ALLEN JENKINS 

in 

"My Wife's An Angel" 



THE 3 STOOGES 

Curly . . . Larry . . . Moe 
in "THREE LITTLE TWIRPS" 







Riotous 



'."Knot 







■W 



<M 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 6, 1943 



Warner Studio to Maintain Capacity Production 



i 



Company to be Prepared 
For Changing Conditions, 
Declares Ben Kalmenson 



(Continued from Page 1) 

exact number of features to be re- 
leased, Kalmenson said, with the stu- 
dio maintaining capacity production 
in order to be prepared for any 
changes in present conditions. Final 
releases for 1942-43 will be "The 
Constant Nymph," starring Charles 
Boyer, Joan Fontaine and Alexis 
Smith; Irving Berlin's "This Is the 
Army," and "Background to Dan- 
ger," starring George Raft and Syd- 
ney Greenstreet with Brenda Mar- 
shall and Peter Lorre. 

Among Early Releases 
Early releases on the new sched- 
ule will include the following com- 
pleted films, not necessarily in order 
of release: "Watch on the Rhine," 
starring Bette Davis and Paul Lu- 
kas in the prize-winning Broadway 
play; "Thank Your Lucky Stars," 
with Humphrey Bogart, Eddie Can- 
tor, Bette Davis, Olivia de Havilland, 
Errol. Flynn, John Garfield, Joan 
Leslie, Ida Lupino, Dennis Morgan, 
Ann Sheridan, Dinah Shore, Alexis 
Smith, Jack Carson, Alan Hale, Ed- 
ward Everett Horton, S. Z. Sakall, 
Hattie McDaniel, Willie Best, Ruth 
Donnelly, Don Wilson, Henry Ar- 
metta, Noble Johnson, Spike Jones 
and his City Slickers. 

Also, "Old Acquaintance," from the stage 
hit, with Bette Davis, Miriam Hopkins, John 
Loder and Gig Young: "Princess O'Rourke." 
with Olivia de Havilland, Robert Cummings, 
Charles Coburn and Jane Wyman; "The Desert 
Song," with Dennis Morgan, Irene Manning, 
Bruce Cabot, Lynne Overman and Gene Lock- 
hart; "Devotion," with Olivia de Havilland, 
Ida Lupino, Nancy Coleman, Paul Henreid 
and Sydney Greenstreet, based on the life 
of the Bronte Sisters; "Saratoga Trunk," 
with Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman, from 
Edna Ferber's best-seller; "Arsenic and Old 
Lace," from the stage hit, with Cary Grant, 
Priseilla Lane, Raymond Massey, Peter Lorre 
and Edward Everett Horton, and "The Ad- 
ventures of Mark Twain," starring Fredric 
March and Alexis Smith. 

To Be Ready for Season 

In production and scheduled to be com- 
pleted by the start of the new season are: 
"Northern Pursuit," starring Errol Flynn 
and Julie Bishop, with Helmut Dantine and 
Gene Loekhart: "Destination Tokyo," with 
Cary Grant, John Garfield and Alan Hale; 
"Conflict," with Humphrey Bogart, Alexis 
Smith, Sydney Greenstreet, and Rose Hobart. 

Also, "In Our Time," from Robert St. 
John's book, with Ida Lupino, Paul Henreid, 
Nancy Coleman, Nazimova, Mary Boland and 
Morris Carnovsky; "Shine On Harvest Moon," 
musical based on the life of Nora Bayes, 
with Ann Sheridan, Dennis Morgan, Jack 
Carson and Irene Manning. 

A group of Victory Pictures including 
"Adventures in Iraq," "Murder on the Water- 
front," "Crime by Night," "The Last Ride" 
and "Find the Blackmailer" are also ready 
for release. 

On Shooting Schedule 

Among features scheduled for early shoot- 
ing are "Battle Cry," a Howard Hawks pro- 
duction; "Passage to Marseille," follow up 
to "Casablanca"; "The Horn Blows at Mid- 
night," with Jack Benny; "Rhapsody in 
Blue," based on the life of George Gersh- 
win: "Mr. Skeffington," starring Bette Davis; 
"Uncertain Glory," starring Errol Flynn; 
"The Gay Blades," "Here Come the Girls," 
musical with Ann Sheridan, Ida Lupino, 
Alexis Smith and Jane Wyman, and "Three 
Strangers," John Huston original, starring 
George Brent. 

Stage play properties scheduled for fu- 
ture production include 'The Doughgirls," 
"Dark Eyes," 'The Corn is Green," "Janie," 



TO THE COLORS! 



* COMMISSIONED * 

RICHARD DUBE, business manager of 20th-Fox 
publicity and advertising department, ensign 
Naval Reserve. 

* PROMOTED * 

JOHN SILVETWATCH, USA, former manager, 
Strand, Clinton, Mass., to corporal. 

* TO OFFICERS~SCH00LS * 

FRANKLIN FERGUSON, USA, former manager, 
Whitney, New Haven. 

* ARMY * 

MICKEY NUNES, chief of service, Paramount 

Theater, New Haven. 
PETER DE FAZIO, salesman, Warners, New 

Haven. 
ROBERT MERRILL, Strand, Hartford, Conn. 
WALTER CORREA, assistant manager, Durfee, 

Fall River, Mass. 



JOSEPH MCCARTHY, Colonial, Gloucester, 
Mass. 

WILLIAM HUMPHRIES, Jr., son of the 20th-Fox 
salesman, Philadelphia. 

WILLIAM KANEFSKY, Earle Theater, Philadel- 
phia. 

— • — 

* NAVY * 

WILLIAM KARENCHUK, booker, FRC, New 
Haven. 

— • — 

* MARINE CORPS * 

DANNY FISCHER, Stanley-Warner, Philadel- 
phia. 

— • — 

* ARMY AIR FORCE * 

RALPH COLLENCELLO, Loews Poli, Hartford, 
Conn. 



Pinks "Last Will of Dr. Mabuse" 

Chicago — Police censors here in 
June pinked but one film, "The 
Last Will of Dr. Mabuse," out of 
73 films — 298,000 feet — inspected 
Eleven cuts were made, but no pic- 
ture was rejected. 



"Ethan Frame," "Brooklyn, U. S. A.," "Dad- 
dies," "The Animal Kingdom," and Ibsen's 
"Pillars of Society." 

Book properties scheduled include "Night 
Shift," by Maritta Wolf, starring Joan 
Crawford; "Country Lawyer," by Bellamy 
Partridge: "Green Eyes," new Sinclair Lewis 
novel; "Mississippi Belle," by Clements Rip- 
ley, to be made into a musical with Cole 
Porter music; "The Time Between," by 
Gale Wilhelm: "The Conspirators," by Fred- 
ric Prokosch; "Nobody Lives Forever," by 
W. R. Burnett; "Danger Signal," by Phyllis 
Bottome and "Happiness," by Mildred Cram. 

Other Warner properties include "Singing 
in the Wilderness," story of John James 
Audubon; "Misunderstood," by Lili Hat- 
vany, to be produced by Robert Buckner, 
starring Bette Davis; "Treasure of the Sierra 
Madre," "Will Rogers," "The Widow Wouldn't 
Weep," "God is My Co-Pilot," by Robert 
Lee Scott; "Al Schmid, War Hero," "Life of 
Marilyn Miller," "Humoresque," "George, 
the Devil and Rosie," "Deep Valley" and 
"Broken Journey," play by Andrew Rosen- 
thal. 

Roster of 1943-44 Talent 

Warners' contract list of stars and fea- 
tured players includes Humphrey Bogart, 
George Brent, Nancy Coleman, Joan Crawford, 
Bette Davis, Olivia de Havilland, Geraldirie 
Fitzgerald, Errol Flynn, John Garfield, Syd- 
ney Greenstreet, Paul Henried, Walter Hus- 
ton, Priseilla Lane, Joan Leslie, Ida Lupino, 
Irene Manning, Dennis Morgan, Ann Sheri- 
dan, Alexis Smith, Julie Bishop, Jack Car- 
son, Dane Clark, Helmut Dantine, Faye 
Emerson, Victor Francen, Alan Hale, Gene 
Loekhart, John Loder, Hattie McDaniel, Do- 
lores Moran, Eleanor Parker, Claude Rains, 
Joyce, Reynolds, John Ridgely, S. Z. Sakall, 
George Tobias and Jajie Wyman. 

Additional artists engaged for special pic 
tures include Gary Cooper, Eddie Cantor, 
Dinah Shore, Cary Grant, Ingrid Bergman, 
Edward Everett Horton, Flora, Robson, Mir- 
iam Hopkins, Peter Lorre, George Murphy, 
Charles Butterworth, Una Merkel, Dolores 
Costello, Robert Cummings, Charles Coburn, 
Fredric March, Donald Crisp, C. Aubrey 
Smith and John Carradine. 

Directors include Michael Curtiz, Lewis 
Milestone, Raoul Walsh, Herman Shumlin, 
Edmund Goulding, Irving Rapper, David 
Butler, Curtis Bernhardt, Edward Blatt, 
Delmar Daves, Vincent Sherman, B. Reaves 
Eason, Leroy Prinz, Jean Negulesco and 
Peter Godfrey. 

Producers include Hal B. Wallis, Jesse L. 
Lasky, Jerry Wald, Mark Hellinger, Henry 
Blanke, Robert Buckner, Jack Chertok, Wil- 
liam Jacobs, Julius J. Epstein, Philip G, 
Epstein and Gordon Hollingshead, in addi- 
tion to Howard Hawks, who will make 
"Battle Cry.'! 



Stone's Second for UA a Musical 

Andrew Stone and Frederick Jack- 
son will produce a second feature for 
United Artists release, having com- 
pleted their first, "Hi Diddle Diddle." 
The latter will be released this month. 
New production will be a musical, 
slated to include specialty numbers 
and "name" bands. Casting begins 
this week. 



RKO, Disney Add Year 
To Releasing Pad 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Disney's seventh group of shorts anc 
carries an option for the cl**" ;"bu 
tion of the eighth group. Aa-wCion 
ally, there will be the Disney fea- 
ture previously announced as "Sur 
prise Package" and currently titled 
tentatively as "Let's Go Latin," whicr 
will introduce a revolutionary tech- 
nical process invented by the Disnev 
studio. This feature, as well as the 
18 shorts, will be in Technicolor. 

RKO has distributed the Disney 
product for seven seasons, the first 
contract having been signed in 
March, 1936. 



McGrann Joins Agency 

Frank McGrann, a former ex 
ploitation director for Columbia Pic 
tures, will go into the employment 
agency business today when he 
will inaugurate a radio and motion 
picture division for the Position Se- 
curing Bureau, Inc. He will make 
his offices at the midtown branch of 
the agency. 




I 




*H GOOP \&& " 




1 J 1 S I Z 3 k N 

is Hin M HZ 

5MO I 1 DRCKU! cl cl ^N 
MDlMHitlUfcl 1 l J 1 1 I ) ) y 



.. 



B&SR^ 



1 1 » 



ovf 



Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 




The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



T -OL 84, NO. 4 



22 



NEW YORK, WEDNESDAY, JULY 7, 1943 



TEN CENTS 



DIVORCEMENT BILL IN SENATE 



Key City Holiday Grosses Up 28% for New Marks 



Broadway Leads Parade as 
Extra Shows, Higher Prices 
Prove Bonanza for Exhibs. 



Key city film grosses over the 
three-day Fourth of July holiday 
soared to an all-time record, run- 
ning 28 per cent ahead of the 1942 
Fourth and the corresponding week- 
end last year, it is shown in a 
roundup of key city and circuit head- 
quarters reports compiled yesterday. 

Broadway led the parade with an 
all-time high aggregate gross that 
topped last year by more than 40 
per cent, due in part to extra shows 
and higher average box-office scales, 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Skeleton OWI Film 
Bureau in Hollywood 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — OWI will definitely 
naintain liaison work between Hol- 
ywood and Washington, Ulric Bell, 
OWI official in Hollywood, has in- 
formed the industry. Bell was act- 
ng under instructions from OWI 
mief Elmer Davis, and has served 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Clearance Cuts Sought 
For Basil Bros. Houses 



Basil Bros. Theaters has filed two 
tomplaints with the Buffalo arbitra- 
;ion tribunal asking reduction of 
:learance granted houses in Niagara 
?alls and Buffalo. Both actions 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Attainment of Stamp 
Goal Said "Probable" 

Attaining of the War Stamp sale 
goal of $130,000,000 set for the 
July drive by the nation's theaters, 
retailers and newsboys was seen as 
"probable" yesterday by the WAC 
on the basis of reports from exhibi- 
tors across the country. Sparking the 
industry's participation in the month- 
long drive to provide funds for a 
new aircraft carrier, the Shangri-La, 
have been meetings in more than 
100 cities. 



Rockefellers 9 RKO 
Stock Deal on Fire? 

Dillon, Reade & Co. is reported 
in financial circles to be dickering 
with the Rockefeller interests for 
the latter's remaining stock interests 
in RKO Corp. Wall St. houses in 
April acquired 96,000 shares of RKO 
stock from Rockefeller Center as well 
as all of RCA s holdings in the parent 
RKO corporation. 



Extended Time Only, 
"Army's" Sales Plan 

Ben Kalmenson, Warners' general 
sales manager, before leaving yes- 
terday for Chicago to conduct the 
second regional sales meeting, an- 
nounced that selling plans had been 
completed for Irving Berlin's "This 
is the Army" and the pic would be 
handled in a manner to make it "the 
biggest thing that ever hit the film 
industry." 

"This is the Army," Kalmenson 
emphasized, will be sold separately 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Allied Caravan Talking 
Rentals at Cincy Today 

Cincinnati — The Allied Caravan 
meets today at the Netherland 
Plaza, with business sessions start- 
ing at 1 o'clock, p.m. Willis Vance, 
operator of the Twentieth-Century 
suburban house, George Erdman, 
Cleveland, and Leo Jones, Upper San- 
dusky, are representatives for the 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Neely Measure Re-introduced by Kilgore of W. Va. 
Under Agreement with the Department of Justice; 
May Press for Action in Fall if Exhibs. Complain 

By ANDREW H. OLDER Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — The Neely theater divorcement bill is back 
again, having been re-introduced by Sen. Harley M. Kilgore, 
senior senator from West Virginia, under agreement with the 

Department of Justice. S-1312, "to 
prohibit producers and distributors 



First Rep, Regional 
Opens Here Tuesday 



Republic will hold the first of 
three regional sales meetings during 
July at the New York A.C. next 
Tuesday and Wednesday, with other 
parleys to follow in Chicago and at 
the studio, it was announced yester- 
day by Prexy James R. Grainger. 

All district sales managers, fran- 
chise holders, and branch managers 
throughout the country will attend 
one of the sessions, at which will be 
discussed the concentrated publicity 
(Continued on Page 7) 

"Canteen" Terms "Just," 
Sears Wires Pete Wood 



Observing that "the generosity of 
the Cleveland exhibitors is industry 
famous," Grad L. Sears, UA vice- 
prexy, let go from the shoulder yes- 
terday in replying to theater opera- 
tors there who had wired suggest- 
ing that UA provide prints of "Stage 
Door Canteen" without charge in 
return for which the exhibs. would 
donate all receipts to the local USO. 

In his telegram to P. J. Wood, ITO 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Mexican Production, U. S. Aid 

Building Larger Pix Audiences, Says Gould 



Schreiber Named Exec. 
Assistant to Col. Zanuck 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Lew Schreiber, cast- 
ing directors at 20th-Fox, was ap- 
pointed executive assistant to Dar- 
ryl F. Zanuck, the position former- 

(Continued on Page 7) 



By GEORGE H. MORRIS 

FILM DAILY Staff Writer 
Production of native product in 
Mexico will aid rather than retard 
the distribution there of U. S ; films 
both now and in the future, it was 
declared yesterday by Walter Gould, 
head of UA's foreign department, 
following his return to the home 
(Continued on Page 2) 



In distributor circles in New 
York yesterday there was a ten- 
dency to link the re-introduction 
of the theater divorcement meas- 
ure in Congress with the ap- 
proaching termination of the trial 
period of the New York consent 
decree. Some executives obviously 
felt that the Department of Jus- 
tice had suggested that Senator 
Kilgore act at this time, thus pro- 
viding the Government with a 
"club" in November. 



of motion picture films engaged in 
interstate commerce from owning, 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Stockholders Speed 
20th-Fox's NT Deal 



Stockholders of 20th-Fox opened 
the way to making National The- 
aters Corp. the wholly-owned sub- 
sidiary of the film company yester- 
day when they approved a proposal 
(Continued on Page 6) 



Oklahoma City Hit 
By Polio Outbreak 

Oklahoma City— Dr. G. F. Mathews, 
State Health Commissioner, has 
issued a request to Oklahoma City 
parents to keep their children away 
from theaters and all other crowded 
places for the time being due to 
the number of cases, 11 in one day, 
of poliomyelitis being reported. 

There has been no epidemic as yet, 
with only 23 cases reported through- 
out the state but the 11 reported 
here in one day was viewed by Dr. 
Mathews as offering serious possibili- 
ties. 



"Jity 



DAILY 



Wednesday, July 7, 1943 




Vol. 84, No. 4 Wed., July 7, 1943 10 Cents 



JOHN W. ALICOATE 



DONALD M. MERSEREAU 



CHESTER B. BAHN 



Publisher 



General Manager 



Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address- 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco-Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



FINANCIAL 



{Tuesday, July 6) 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 
16i/ 4 16'/ 4 16l/ 4 + V4 
18i/ 4 17 171/2 — 1 



Am. Seat > . . . 

eol.Picts.vtc. (2i/ 2 %) 
Columbia Picts. pfd.. 

Con. Fm. Ind 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd. . . 

East. Kodak 

Cen. Prec. Eq 

Loew's, Inc 

Paramount 

RKO 

RKO $6 pfd 

20th Century- Fox . . 
20th Century-Fox pfd. 

Warner Bros 

do pfd 

NEW YORK 
Para. B'way 3s55... 

Para. Picts. deb. 4s56 

Warner Bros.' dbs. 6s48 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Monogram Picts 3% 31/2 3J4 

Radio-Keith cvs 1% 

Sonotone Corp 3% 

Technicolor 12% 

Trans-Lux 3Yz 

Universal Corp. vtc 

Universal Picts 19% 19 19 — % 

N. Y. OVER-THE-COUNTER SECURITIES 

Bid Asked 
Roxy Thea. Bldg. 4s 1st '57 76 79i/ 4 



2% 
17% 
165% 

223/4 

621/4 
281/z 
9i/4 
95 

21% 
321/2 
151/4 
891/4 
BOND 
78 



2% 27/ 8 + % 

171/4 171/4 + 1/4 

165 165 

221/4 221/4 

61% 61 34 — V4 

28 283,4 + 1/4 

9 9—1/4 

94% 943/4 + 1/4 

21 Vs 21 % — 1/4 

32% 32% — % 

15 15 — i/ 8 

891/4 891/4 

MARKET 

78 78+1 



1% 13/4 

33/g 3% — % 

12% 12% 

31/2 31/2 ....: 



Appraise R. L. Blank 
Estate at $492,999 

Des Moines, la. — The inheritance 
tax appraiser's valuation of the es- 
tate of Raymond L. Blank, who was 
treasurer of Tri-States and Central- 
States Theaters Corps., was placed 
at $492,999.32, or $195,296.95 more 
than the value estimated in the es- 
tate inventory. 

Blank, who was 33, died March 7 
of a heart attack. His father, A. H. 
Blank, is president of both theater 
corporations. 



Mexican Production 
United Stales Aid 



{Continued from Page 1) 

office on Sunday from a five-week 
business trip to Mexico. He said 
that there is very tangible evidence 
of this currently, for Mexican pic- 
tures are building larger audiences, 
and this is a healthy condition which 
works in favor of any attractions 
exported to that country for exhibi- 
tion. Furthermore, he added, Amer- 
ican film interests are both capable 
and versatile enough to meet compe- 
tition and "to keep a step ahead." 

At the present time, Mexico's 
producers, of whom six or seven are 
of top calibre, followed by some 
four or five of somewhat lesser 
power, are on the crest of a produc- 
tion wave, turning out between 40 
and 50 features, but that when the 
war is over this number will prob- 
ably be reduced in order to accent 
quality. Studios there realize that 
such production restriction is to their 
advantage. No studio space is avail- 
able now for expansion, otherwise 
there would be even more than the 
40 to 50 pictures put into work. 

Gould said that the recent de- 
mand of the labor union, which con- 
trols film exchange employes in 
Mexico City, has been met, and that 
the pact, granting a 20 per cent 
wage boost, was signed on June 25 
by U. S. company subsidiaries there. 
Relations between the distributors 
and the unions are more friendly 
than at any time in the past, and 
this is a promising omen for the fu- 
ture. 

Establishment of a governing body 
for filmland in Mexico, similar to 
MPPDA, is crystallizing rapidly. 

UA's "Moon and Sixpence" hung 
up a gross in excess of 50,000 pesos 
during the first week of its engage- 
ment at the Chino Theater in Mex- 
ico City, and the Latin-American 
premiere of "In Which We Serve" 
takes place today at the Alameda 
there. 



Will Hays Inspects Navy 
Radar School in Chicago 

Chicago — Will Hays, en route to 
Hollywood, visited the Navy's Radar 
school, in the State Lake building 
quarters loaned to the Navy by B & 
K. School is supervised by Lt. Com. 
Will Eddy, formerly in charge of 
the B & K television department. 

Hays termed the Radar school "a 
most impressive enterprise." 



Clemens, W. Va., Circuit 
Head, Dies in Plane Crash 



Dunbar, W. Va. — Archie Clemens, 
34, operator of The Black Diamond 
Theaters Circuit, was killed instant- 
ly when his plane crashed. Clemens, 
a CAP licensed pilot, operated a 
flying school at Montgomery, W. 
Va., besides his theater activities. 



Skeleton OWI Film 
Bureau in Hollywood 

(Continued from Page 1) 
notice that the agency will continue 
to clear the film work of other Gov- 
ernment agencies and will also do 
"liaison work." That is the only 
definite indication that there will be 
a skeleton OWI film bureau, with 
offices here and in Hollywood. 

There is a growing belief here 
that WAC will take on a generous 
share of the load formerly carried 
by OWI, aiding in matters of public 
release and the shorts program par- 
ticularly. Lowell Mellett is expected 
to continue to serve as chief of the 
bureau — something the WAC would 
probably insist upon. 



Ernest Stern Sues Loew's, 
Charges Patent Infringed 



Wilmington, Del. — Infringement is 
charged in a suit filed in U. S. Dis- 
trict Court here, by Ernest Stern of 
New York City, against Loew's, 
Inc. The suit, filed under the U. S. 
patent laws cites that on Feb. 19, 
1935, U. S. letters patent No. 1,- 
991,472 were granted to the plaintiff. 
The plaintiff alleges that for a long 
time past infringement has been 
made by the defendant concern by 
practicing a method of producing 
and projecting sound motion pic- 
tures and using a motion picture 
projection procedure which method 
and procedure embody the inven- 
tion which has been patented by 
the plaintiff. 

The suit is contemplated to give 
the plaintiff relief from infringement 
by enjoining the defendant. It also 
asks for a final injunction against 
future infringement and an account- 
ing of profits and damages as well 
as an assessment of costs against 
the defendant. 



Hollywood Chamber 
Hears Coe Tomorrow 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM 'DAILY 
Hollywood — - Charles Francis 
"Socker" Coe will be the principal 
speaker at a dinner sponsored by 
the Hollywood Chamber of Com- 
merce tomorrow. His topic will be 
"Hollywood Looks Toward a New 
World." 




BH.»i 9-4151-4 



comma aid GoinG 



WILL HAYS and his wife have left Chicago 
for Hollywood. 

ANDREW W. SMITH, JR., 20th-Fox's East- 
ern sales manager, leaves today for Washington 
to assist at the installation of C. E. Peppiatt 
as the company's new branch manager there. 

WILLIAM SCHNEIDER of the Paramount ad- 
vertising department is back at his de^ts pm 
a two-week vacation. 

HARRY THOMAS, Monogram distribution ex- 
ecutive, left town yesterday for an extensive 
trip that will take him to Pittsburgh, Cleve- 
land, Detroit, Chicago and points west. 

CHARLES W. KOERNER, RKO's vice-presi- 
dent in charge of production, and PERRY 
LIEBER, studio publicity director, will leave 
Friday for New York. 

STEVE BROIDY, Monogram vice-president and 
general sales manager, is en route from the 
Coast to Chicago, Toronto and New York. 

BETTE DAVIS, now vacationing in New Hamp- 
shire, returns to the Coast about July 20 to 
report to Warners. 



Rockefeller Center Elevator 
Operators Stage a Strike 

Rockefeller Center yesterday was 
without elevator service for 50 min- 
utes at the height of the evening 
rush hour as the result of a flash 
strike involving approximately 225 
operators and mechanics belonging 
to Building Maintenance Crafts- 
men's Union, AFL. The Rockefeller 
management said the strike was not 
against it but was "concerned solely 
with a union matter." A number of 
motion picture companies and trade 
publications with offices in the build- 
ings were inconvenienced by the 
strike. 

The strikers went back to work 
after a talk with Hugh S. Robert- 
son, executive manager of Rocke- 
feller Center, Inc., pending a con- 
ference of the men, union officials 
and the management to be held 
later in the week to discuss the 
cause of the walkout, which was not 
divulged. 



Rites for Mrs. Sheercm 

Funeral rites for Mrs. Catherine 
Sheeran, mother of Harry J. Shee- 
ran, Metro salesman in Cincinnati, 
were held at Queens Village, L. I. 



SEEKING A DEPENDABLE 
SOURCE OF SUPPLY FOR YOUR 

THEATRE 



INTERNATIONAL OFFERS: 
Dependable service . . . Low cost . . . 
45 year's experience serving theatres, 
stadiums, amusement parks, etc. 
We can supply your needs. Roll, 
machine folded, reserve seats, etc. 
Write lor samples, prices or other information. 

Delivery free Maine to Virginia. 

INTERNATIONAL 

TICKET QM\ COMPANY 

52 GRAFTON AVE. X^g/ NEWARK, N. J. 
Sales Of/ices in Principal Centers 



YOTEBYCOMRESS 
SCORED BY RABBIS 

Overriding of Roosevelt on the 

Anti-Strike Bill Declared 

to Show Intemperance 



UNENFORCEABILITY IS SEEN 



Delegates Here Find Measure 



New Army Chocolate Bat 
Resists Heat Up to 120' 

Bp«el&l to Tju New Ton Turn. 
JERSEY CITY, June 27— The 
Army's Jersey City Gjuarter- 
master Depot and chocolate 
manufacturers have developed a 
chocolate bar that will remain a 
solid up to 120 degrees Fahren- 
heit, It was announced yesterday 
by the Quartermaster Depot. 
The ^average chocolate would 
melt at 85 degrees and was a 
tfoonSk 
latest "- ' 



BIDS NATIONS FIGHT 
RAC E PERSEC UTION 

Grand Master Hoffman Tells 
Brith Abraham an Inter- 
National Pact Is Needed 



groups during the Tunisian cam- 
paign. 

"The problem of rehabilitation in 
North Africa emphasizes the need 
of a program which will promote 
better relations between Jew and 
Moslem," he said. 

A message from President 
Roosevelt, read to the delegates, 
expressed hope that deliberations 



15,000 GI VE WEEK 'S WORK 

Teacher* Yield Part of Vacation 
to Aid Draft Boards 



Fifteen thousand school teachers 
in this city will perform one week's 
volunteer work during the sum- 
vacation in the local draft and 
appeals hoards^ CoL Arthur V. Mc- 
Dermott 




t+Z? 



10 f 



the maflrieV* — V - *. 
actment of th^gJJ 

which, because at their i: 35je5^i^7 nia 5 e 
anee and impatience, may jeop*rd-jl875 
ize the orderly democratic proce- 
dures -which alone must he "* 

pended upon to adjust our 

economic relationships i n -!3 
to come. 4M 

New Study Sugsee*'^^J 

'The -Central,- Conferer.c-i- 13 
American Rabbis suggests that tr. .-_ 
law* be carefully reatudied in the 
light of the progressive social leg- 
islation of recent years and that a 
more sober and helpful measure be 
enacted, which wai not sacrifice 
any of the. gains which American 
labor has achieved through the 
years, and which will be fair to all 
concerned."* ' ~~ 

The resolution noted "with' satis- 
faction that American labor has 
to a remarkable degree adhered to 
its *no strike pledge' and because' 
of it and the cooperation of "man- 
agement and the public, our coun-j: 
try has achieved an astounding' ree- 1 
ord of production for the war ef-! 
fort to defeat the Aids powers,'' 1*1 
continued: 

"Even those who are not op- - 
posed to> many of the provisions of 
the bUl h>v& admitted that it has] 
been hastily drawn up, some of its j 
provisions altogether unrelated to 
the war emergency, unenforceable] 
and* therefore, likely to weaken the j 
respect fox law and authority." " t 
/Achievement of Harmony 

The new president of the 'con.-] 
ference/ the Rev. Dr. Solomon B.i 
jreehof of Rodef* Shalom. Congre- 
gation, Pittsburgh, said harmony 
on major issues had been achieved] 
at the six-day meeting, 

"Perhaps the reason, for the! 
Spirit of cooperation which bridged 
all differences," he, commented,! 
"was the fact that in our coh- 
^aeiouflnesa was the vivid awareness! 
-ot the^ tragic- state of European! 
Jewry; in the light of that un- 
Bpealtable tragedy, the conference; 
was more ^concerned with help toi 
maxtyr>d world Iarael than withi 
debate on theoretical differences.''! 

Other offlcerB elected were Dr. 
Abba Hfflel Silver of Cleveland, 
vice president; Rabbi Harry S. 
Margoila, St. Paul, Minn., treaa- 
- lirer; Rabbi L. Regner. Reading, 
Pa., financier secretary; Dr. Isaac 
E. Marcuson, Macon, Ga., admin- 
istrative secretary. 



^^Is^B^^ua from coun- 

mpied' hy Hitler. This 

- , -——"•j money paid for their, emigration to 

rdrK Eye and Ear Palestine and the- Western Heroi- 

tjnfirmary -will be taken over bylsphere. 

lt to^ri *i p|Jig^ ^ ^rts^Uu nbla In Switzerland, food, clothing, 

*££ *h-j shelter and medical aid will be giv- 

Wp* to 1,000 children who .are ex- 

^g^«5ted to be brought out of France 

g£^frr year. Already 5303,000 has 

appropriated to aid refugees 

in Asiatic Russia, $300,000 for 

Oh European emigrants who hav 




been resettled in Central and South 
America, and $100,000 for the 
maintenance of 400 Dutch^refugees 
in 'Surinam. Help- win be given 
refugees released from. Internment 
cprhpatti Jforth" Africa, as well as 
^^rl?i and Second Ave- to destitute -native populations in 
Algeria, Casablanca and Tangier. 



EVERYBODY'S HAPPY 

AT RADIO GIT Y MUSIC HALL! 



*%& 



ev 



coov 



*/' 




Joan Bennett Was Daughter 

8pwi*J u> The Hev Towt Tikes. 
HOLLYWOOD, Calif., June 27— 
Joan Bennett, film actress and wife 
of Walter Wanger, Hollywood mo- 
tion-picture producer, gave birth to 

r a daughter last night at the Good 
Samaritan Hospital. The child was 

.Bamed Stephanie. Miss Bennett's 
other children are Diana, 15, born 
of Miss Bennett's marriage to John 

. Fox, and Melinda Markey, daugh- 
ter by Eugene "Srtarkey, writer and 
producer. Mr, Wanger and Miss 
Bennett were married in Phoenix 
In January, 1840. 




METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER'S HILARIOUS COMEDY! 
She got their autographs in 






VIRGINIA WEIDLER* EDWARD ARNOLD 
JOHN CARROLL' JEAN PORTER 

Directed by EDWARD BUZ2ELL 

Picturing en tht Great Stall *** SMrU-/««oKf £t» Couad C*SMrt »«* 

Sin* Jetof if " **%vS*ptaecle tf mtbd? and dante. PrU>tad h LtoHideffwilh &f Scdeflts, 





A ST OR rwoyMSmSt, 5£t£** ETiwrn^. 
Popular Prices Continuous from 10 A*M* 



• UT WA» tONDt 



ZOOM m/ 

CAB/fl 

\*TH£ 

m 

-u^fr'M's Talk 
1 ■ of the Town 
^$\cal Smotk/ 



CRIftMOri* 



aWBJSS R4010 CITY MUSIC HULL SfWW 

"A foiwy-fcons i/cHcr."— W*B 

"THE YOUNGEST PROFESSION" 

*jth VIRCWW WE1DLER - EDWARD ARNOLD - iOBH CARROLL 
■■MAN PORTER - And FIVE IHPORTAHT GUEST STARS 

A MET^O-GOtDWYN-MAVEB PICTURE 
K' MARCH Of TlMf— "INVASION" 

SaTSTtH: PfrflHntifis lh* wo.-M-toecwi'DonCoiKtctChsnjtwfftSeffts 

fofi-feofjred io "IWN ABOUT TOWN", produced bf loorsldojf.-.wflh 

Ccrpi <** So""- Symphony 0:;-Heti<o. <Cro=;ion of Erne t^««- 

OOOtiOtNT»d«T*n*1«'^oyl0-W KM. ..._.. 

, at, 13^5,1.38, A.-M,7J0,10;3O • S««a.Sfe" ot, 12.55,3.20, 4.2S,*S3 

HU2ANIHC StATS fUHylO IN ADVANCE "• ffc«-CW««-<A«» 

I War tMrfi *m? i';i ji— Arc'et^i tn fvrw 






tt3i5.Sft.tfltMte» 



W'MJJ 



tAST.HJOH00Storai*ir. 

da tcri^o » JOAN uesoe 

The HARD WAY'lfoiwity't "ULUDQ* AMiBOl' 

t (31, S-M. 535. 7<UWIMI- % BOf «. ."HtSTOmt 



DC^f/S»'50™ < ,r3"W;»ai I 



"TB>1 NnWn *«■«' 



/0&*a6t/4k& of the r 



AU SMART ) 
A RE SHOWINI 




ROY ROGERS 



u 



and 



KING OF THE COWBOYS 



SMARTEST HOI 



HEART OF THE GOLDEN WEST" * "RIDIN' DOWN T 

(7cwie<ttndea4e4>: 'in* uo" *"iriNfi of the cawrayc%"caua ac 



"i 



@omt*tq> 



V YORK DAILY NEWS IS 

r^— ■ - NEW v~_ 






- — ^L Your T * M 

*Ll rea * for c 

....... . f-ZZzmw^.. 



HHm 



. Brooklyn, N. Y 

St. Louis, Mo 

San Diego, Calif. 

. Baltimore, Md. 

. Chicago, III. 

. . Atlanta, Ga. 

Denver, Colo. 

. Newark, N. J. 

. Houston, Texas 

Dallas, Texas 

. San Antonio, Texas 

. Seattle, Wash. 

.Wichita Falls, Texas 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

. Tampa, Fla. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

. Providence, R. I. 



W THE MOVIES 



JiYON"* 



>NDS ACROSS THE 



>& 



"'•"•back 

* a *°' 
Sh 9 u rS ""d 

T *° n 9 of 
Texas" af 

*rookly n 

Sf rand. 



W.i^MM. 



~~''&SS ■■ 



■£ik 



By 



WAN* 



Republk 



Hale 



mmmgi 



w, ,''s a <^iV 7 6 flow ok i-ne- 

f '4 X ?5S is p hlcle is 

ev»,? ,s '"ore a ® ' Su PPo rt »„5-, aii 



nuantat * Unn ^ ffi*?* ?**fi 
l±,-,.. T ^c AST: ' h ° u ^ 



Boh *oi •■■■ CAST ' 



a? Ss 

Pete. ™ Urr ay. ... " 



ever k m °re e»„ Su PPort aJv" / U'i- "" ^ Eve £ aade 

sogers n ltla n.it' s / , ' ' ■ 1 1 , ' n 

s ^odeo ^i!P Jc ture. T,?i ay tb em- / for ft. to So 0ut and £¥ #o es s r 



R -.Sh e ;,a°n e ers 
Bar 'on jw R Va n 
•Har r " S^-Une 
• ' ■ • Pat % nno " 

W '«'am K ud ee 
'■■•■Eve £ aad e 
•Ha; T ,. Ma '-eh 



, as ^eo It l Pict ^ T& ay th ^ 
boss ' busft s wh °, disl?^ a PPear 

their jy Wn anch and Pr ! 1' Uy ^em- 

do , w n and •«„; a °W <,/ a p ^aJce c °rral and < u he *ors« A en sta 
, ta ^e h ijn ° °«t happ" far now / r anch and he tri £ Se fout of f 

hlm ud «„ J hei * ranch he °o ys Roy a ^°p Sue. But J, ° b "y th 

>ovv 



h „ To make thi» buye r 

?"<* from i", e Wes to ° h ' of «■" 



.$," few" ! ««hij fe r f »»« PH» !?/ fia^ e E .? s .%" "Ka nb a ; 



Reprinted from 

THE NEW YORK 
DAILY NEWS 

June 26, 1943 



,n «- that ox ,s ^er da^ that the / a nd ^u" n * i an s -e~'>«A airi e," "n 



BORDER' 



v% 



DULY 



Wednesday, July 7, 1943 



Extended Time Only, 
"Army's" Sales Plan 



(Continued from Page 1) 

with the Warner sales force in- 
structed to obtain extended playing 
time in all engagements, and wher- 
ever possible to make the run longer 
than that of any picture to date. 

Working" in co-operation with a War De- 
partment public relations staff headed by 
Col. Charles Johnson, Warners will launch 
the picture late this month in a series of 
advanced-price premieres. The Broadway 
world premiere, on the night of July 28 at 
the Hollywood, will be at $50 top, with 
most of the seats expected to be sold at 
this figure. 

Openings at $25 top already lave been 
set in Washington, Baltimore, Worcester. 
New Haven, Hartford and a score of addi- 
tional key cities, while St. Louis, San Fran- 
cisco, Seattle, Spokane, Los Angeles and 
more than a hundred other Midwest, West- 
ern and Southern situations already are set 
to open at tops ranging from $25 down 
to $2. 

This advanced-price opening policy is to 
be carried out in all cities down to 5,000 
population, as well as in smaller places 
wherever practicable. 

General release date of the picture is Aug\ 
14. by which time it is expected that more 
than 400 Technicolor prints will be ready 
and working. Total print order is 450. 

The Army's public relations division, in 
co-operation with the Warner advertising and 
publicity forces under Charles Einfeld and 
Mort Blumenstoek, will set up local com- 
mittees to give a strong sendoff to the pic 
in all premieres. Follow-up activity also 
will accompany every engagement. 

Warner home office delegation which left 
New York yesterday (Tuesday) for the Chi- 
cago sales meeting included, in addition to 
Kalmenson. Joseph Bernhard, Arthur Saeh- 
son, Roy Haines, A. W. Schwalbergr, Jules 
Lapidus, Norman H. Moray, Howard Levin- 
son. Ed Hinchey, I. F. Dolid, Albert S. 
Howson. 

Blumenstoek remained in New York 
due to conferences on "This is the Army/' 
and may be able to attend the second day 
of the Chicago sessions. 



Brunet, Theater Vet, Dies 

New Orleans, La. — Paul Brunet, 
66, independent movie theater opera- 
tor, suffered a fatal heart attack. 
Brunet, in theater business since 
1904, was one of the first to op- 
erate a moving picture house on 
Canal St. For years he ran a neigh- 
borhood theater at Ursuline and N. 
Clairbome. For the past few years 
he was associated with his son, Paul 
H. Brunet, as owner and operator 
of a theater at 1309 S. Rampart St. 




Thomas C. Poe Dead 

Findlay, O.— Thomas C. Poe, 61, 
former motion picture theater oper- 
ator in Findlay, O., died in Cleve- 
land, leaving his wife and two chil- 
dren. 




George Cukor 
Raymond Hatton 



Jackie Searl 
Ricardo Cortez 



T T ▼ 

"Manna for Exhibitors Luncheon" 

• • • HERALDING the advent of RKO Radio's "Behind the Ris- 
ing Sun," which will have multi-ply premieres in some 50 to 60 New 
England and New York State stands commencing Aug. 3, and subse- 
quently in the Pacific Northwest prior to general distribution throughout 
the nation, the company yesterday noontide hosted a luncheon for the 
author of the book on which the film is based, — James R. Young, prom- 
inent journalist and lecturer who spent 13 years as a newspaper cor- 
respondent in Japan Repast's venue was the Waldorf-Astoria, and 

attending were, in addition to a big contingent of trade scribes, Ned E. 
Depinet (who served as toastmaster), Phil Reisman, N. Peter Rathvon, 
Bob Mochrie, Barret McCormick, Nat Levy, Walter Branson, Harry Gittle- 
son, Harry Mandel, Rutgers Neilson, Malcolm Kingsberg, Leon Goldberg. 
Louis Goldberg, Michael Hoffay, Terry Turner, Arthur Brilant, Jack Level, 
Harry Reiners, R. H. Hawkinson, etc 

T T T 

• • • IF this informal luncheon were to be given a formal name, 
it could rightly be termed the "Manna For Exhibitors Luncheon,"— 
for it plainly disclosed the box office windfall in store for showmen 

everywhere Ned Depinet revealed that early last February, RKO 

Radio began searching for a property which would tell accurately and 
dramatically the character of the enemy we are facing in the Pacific 

What was sought would stand as a sort of companion-piece to 

the heavy-grossing "Hitler's Children" Quest was handsomely re- 
warded by acquisition of Young's book, "Behind the Rising Sun" 

The author, who spent 61 days in solitary confinement under Nipponese 
tormentors until his release was effected by the State Department, 
then was persuaded to act as technical adviser, together with his wife 
Furhermore, Young consented to make personal radio appear- 
ances with the picture in its sectional day-and-date engagements 

At yesterday's luncheon, he spoke at length on Japan, its people and 

customs And, Mister Exhibitor, when he gives his planned series 

of addresses over the radio, in conjunction with release of the film, 
you'd better get your SRO sign out for early display, 'cause the talks 
are sure to start a stampede of patrons to your ticket booth 

T T T 

• • • BECAUSE he was talking to professional pic folks yes'dcy. 
Young devoted a portion of his remarks to the celluloid side of Japan 

He asserted that the Japs, via characteristic guile, used not only 

their own product to sell the public there on the inevitability o£ the Jap- 
anese-American war, but also U. S. pix The latter they altered to 

that purpose, particularly "Hell Divers" which they thefted and dubbed, 

titling it "The Japanese-American War" While, the adulterated 

scenes flashed on the large screen, a smaller screen beside it carried in- 
flamatory titles anent the plot of the U. S. to attack Japan, and, there- 
fore, that threatened Nippon should build up its armed forces to defend 

itself Japan, he said, has become the largest film producing nation 

in the world, with footage far exceeding our own land The Nips, 

he added, are fanatical on the subject of machinery, and have been 
since 1926, even lifting our mechanical creations, among them air condi- 
tioning, for their own ends But the Young talk was also spiked 

with amusing anecdotes, — and tragedy It is the latter element, the 

viciousness of the Japanese, which will make the ether crackle when 
he takes to the air-waves in behalf of RKO Radio's "Behind the Rising 
Sun" It's bound to be a gargantuan gross-grabber 

▼ T T 

• • • AVENGE PEARL HARBOR! ! ! 



Stockholders Speed 
20fh-Fox's NT Deal 



(Contintced from Page 1) 

that the' latter exercise an option to 
purchase the Chase National Bank's 
58 per cent holdings in the circuit 
for $13,000,000. The deal, in which 
are involved 1,044 shares of the. .- 
standing capital stock of Natly.* } 
Theaters, received their blessings at 
a special meeting at the 20th-Fox 
home office. 

The option to purchase the Chase 
National Bank's stock interest in 
National Theaters, which was ob- 
tained on May 11, would have ex- 
pired on Nov. 30. 

At the same time the stockhold- 
ers sanctioned an amendment to the 
company's charter authorizing the 
creation of a new prior preferred 
stock to be sold publicly, with the 
proceeds going toward the purchase 
of the National Theaters shares 
from the Chase Bank. The issue 
will consist of 100,000 shares to be 
marketed at $100 per share. It is 
understood that the shares, which 
will carry a $4.50 dividend, will be 
sold to net 20th-Fox $9,700,000. The 
difference of $3,300,000 will come 
from the 20th-Fox treasury. 

Spyros Skouras, president of 20th- 
Fox, presided at the stockholders' 
meeting. Other executives of the 
company in attendance were Tom 
Connors, Sydney Towell, W. C. 
Michel, Hermann G. Place, Felix A. 
Jenkins, Dan Michalove. 

Immediately following the stock- 
holders' meeting the directors of 
20th-Fox held a session at which 
they approved sale of the new stock 
to a group of underwriters under- 
stood to be headed by Lehman Bros., 
Hayden, Stone & Co. and Blyth & 
Co., Inc. 



Ludwig Siegel Seriously 111 

Chicago — Ludwig Siegel, owner of 
the Lindy, is seriously ill at his 
home. 



IN NEW POSTS 



CEORCE WALDMAN, film buying dept., Warner 
Circuit, Philadelphia. 

HERBERT BLASS, Twin City sales rep., War- 
ners' Minneapolis exchange. 

E. HART, ad salesman, Warners' Milwaukee ex- 
change. 

DAVID ARLEN, publicity dept., B & K, Chi- 
cago. 

WALDO BAIL, publicity dept., B & K, Chi- 
cago. 

CHARLES NELSON, Allied Theaters booking 
dept., Chicago. 

WARD DAY, cashier, 20th-Fox, Chicago. 

JULES CREEN, assistant buyer and booker, War- 
ner Theaters, Pittsburgh. 

EDWARD DLOUHY, manager, Apollo, Chicago. 

RAY THOMPSON, manager, Gateway, Chicago. 

JOSEPH ANDERSON, manager, Belpark, Chi- 
cago. 

V. J. FISCHER, manager, Valencia, Evanston, 

Ind. 
T. DUCKWORTH, assistant manager, Coronet, 

Evanston, Ind. 
ROBERT LEACH, head booker, RKO exchange, 

Des Moines. 



Wednesday, July 7, 1943 



3ft 



DAILY 



Key City Holiday 
Grosses Ri» 28% 

(Continued from Page 1) 

although a record influx of visitors 
provided practically all Times Square 
houses with S.R.O. 

Broadway Biz Phenomenal 

Phenomenal business was reported 
-4)jjie Broadway houses over the 
.1 '-day holiday week-end. Eighty- 
four thousand persons paid $63,000 
to see "The Youngest Profession" 
at the Music Hall on Saturday, Sun- 
day and Monday. Gus Eyssell, man- 
aging director, announced that was 
a Fourth of July holiday record for 
the house. The week is expected 
to end tonight with $114,000 in the 
till. A crowd estimated at close to 
60,000 brought $44,000 to the Para- 
mount, where "Dixie" is the attrac- 
tion. "Spitfire" was good for $14,500 
at the Rivoli for the three days. 

Some 60,000 persons plunked out an esti- 
mated $45,000 to view "Stage Door Can- 
teen" at the Capitol. "Coney Island" grossed 
$59,000 at the Roxy lor the three days, 
with $98,000 expected for the week, which 
closed last night. Business for the three 
days set a record for an M-G-M show at 
the Astor, where "Best Foot Forward" is 
playing. 

Even "Mission to Moscow," in its tenth 
week, played to standees, while the New 
York Strand with "Background to Danger" 
did better than $40,000 in the four-day 
period from Friday through Monday, an all- 
time Fourth of July holiday record for this 
house. 

"Dixie" Wows 'Em in Dixie 

Paramount, which selected the holiday 
week-end to launch "Dixie" in pre-release 
engagements in the South, reported heavy 
increases over openings of "Holiday Inn," 
last year's Labor Day offering, with upward 
percentages claimed of 28 to 67 per cent. 
In Denver, isolated northern opening, 
"Dixie" went 14 per cent over "Inn" figures 
in four days. 

An unusual feature of the week-end busi- 
ness was the exceptionally strong Monday 
attendance, according to circuit executives 
in New York and many of the key city 
sources. Ordinarily, these spokesmen pointed 
out, Monday trade falls off somewhat at 
the end of a three-day holiday. This year, 
Monday biz topped Saturday and Sunday in 
many spots. 

While some theater operators express the 
opinion that this splurge was the final one 
before the Government starts taking 20 per 
cent of pay checks, there is a widespread 
belief in the exhibition field that the pub- 
lic is not only in a strong spending mood but 
so keen for film entertainment, and still 
making so much money, that little effect 
is expected when the deductions start this 
week. 

Single notable report of off biz for the 
holiday week-end came from Boston where 
an exodus of about one million for shore 
resorts and mountains was reported. Hub 
downtown and suburban houses took it on 
the chin. 

Arehort House to Parrott 

Milford, la. — H. A. Parrott who 
operates the Palace at Exira has 
taken over the Strand at Milford 
from E. C. Arehart. 



Divorcement Bill in Senate 

Neeley Measure Re-introduced by Kilgore 



Eastman's Capt. Keliey, 
Held by Japs, Dead 

Rochester — Capt. James D. Keliey, 
formerly of Eastman Kodak Co. has 

died of disease in a Japanese 
|jjBj, prison camp in which he was 
\^—$ interned following his capture 

in the Pacific area, the War 
Department has announced following 
International Red Cross advices. 



(Continued f 

controlling, managing, operating, or 
having any interest in motion pic- 
ture theaters in the United States," 
was introduced Monday by Senator 
Kilgore after numerous complaints 
had come to him from independent 
exhibitors that the terms of the New 
York consent decree are not being 
lived up to by the majors. 

Senator Kilgore told The Film 
Daily yesterday there is no especial 
significance attached to his action in 
reintroducing the bill aside from the 
fact that he was reminded the old 
Neely bill had died when he received 
the exhibitor complaints. As chair- 
man of the Senate Judiciary Sub- 
commitee handling the Neely bill, he 
had agreed with the Department of 
Justice to keep it alive in the hope 
that the threat of the bill might 
tend to keep parties to the decree in 
step. 

Says Fall Action Possible 

The West Virginian said he had not studied 
the exhibitor complaints and has no im- 
mediate plans to push the bill. He was de- 
sirous of getting it entered before the Senate 
recess, however, and feels there is some pos- 
sibility of action on the matter in the Fall 
if the complaints appear to be well grounded. 
He has no intention at this time of re- 
entering ex-Senator Neely's old block-book- 



rom Page 1) 

ing bill, he said, although if he finds it is 
needed, he will do so. 

The Kilgore bill differs in no way from 
Neely's old bill. Holding of and acquisition of 
affiliated theaters by producers and distribu- 
tors, it says, "is contrary to public policy in 
that it (a) has resulted in granting to affil- 
iated theaters undue preferences; (b) has 
caused unfair discrimination against indepen- 
dent theaters with respect to leasing of films 
in commerce: (e) has enabled such producers 
and distributors to acquire a virtual monop- 
oly of the first-run theaters in the principal 
cities and a virtual monopoly of subsequent- 
run theaters in certain cities and sections; 
(d) interferes with the freedom and oppor- 
tunity of independent exhibitors to select and 
obtain an adequate supply of quality films 
for exhibition in their theaters; (e) pre- 
vents the people of the several states and 
the local communities thereof from influenc- 
ing such election in the best interests of the 
public: and tends to create a monopoly in 
the production, distribution, and exhibition 
of films in commerce." 

After Section 2, containing definitions, 
comes the "meat" of the bill, where Con- 
gress is asked to declare that "it shall be 
unlawful for any producer or distributor of 
motion picture films engaged in commerce 
to own, control, manage, buy, or book films 
for, or operate, in whole or in part, any 
motion picture theater or theaters located in 
any State. Territory, or the District of Co- 
lumbia, or to have any interest, direct or 
indirect, legal or equitable, through stock 
ownership or otherwise in any such motion 
picture theater or theaters." 

The same penalties as in the Neely bill 
are provided, and the effective date of the 
bill would be 18 months after its enactment. 



Schreiber Named Exec. 
Assistant to Col. Zanuck 



(Continued from Page 1) 

ly held by William Goetz. Casting 
responsibilities will be shared by 
Robert Palmer, James Ryan and 
William Mayberry. 

I. R. L. Hough has been appointed 
general production manager to suc- 
ceed the late William Koenig. 



Guiol to Direct Own Story 
For Global; UA to Release 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM 'DAILY 
Hollywood — Fred Guiol, who was 
associate producer on "The More 
the Merrier" and "Penny Serenade" 
for Columbia and who also directed 
"Thanks a Million" for Hal Roach, 
will produce and direct his own story, 
"The Yanks Down Under," for Glo- 
bal Productions for United Artists 
release. 

The screenplay is by Eugene Con- 
rad and Edward Seabrook. 



William Weinberg's Son 
Killed in South Pacific 



Chicago — Al Weinberg, son of 
William Weinberg, manager of the 
Ken Theater, was killed in action in 
the South Seas. 



August Selig Dead 

Rockford, Ind. — August Selig, 73, 
associated with his brother, William 
N., in the old Selig Plyscope Co., 
is dead. He managed the buying and 
selling for the pioneer film com- 
pany. Survivors include a widow, 
two sons, his brother and a sister. 



"Canteen" Terms "Just," 
Sears Wires Pete Wood 



(Continued from Page 1) 

of Ohio secretary, who had signed 
the Cleveland exhibs.' earlier wire, 
Sears said he was "afraid it will not 
be possible as a practical matter to 
comply with the proposal to turn 
over 100 per cent of the receipts of 
'Stage Door Canteen' to the local 
USO," called attention to the terms 
of Sol Lesser's agreement with the 
American Theater Wing, said UA 
was "genuinely in accord with the 
Stage Door Canteen movement and 
considered it an obligation . . . to 
deliver a record gross" and added 
that the company feels, regardless 
of the charitable and patriotic angle, 
it is "asking just and reasonable 
terms in accordance with the straight 
commercial value of this picture." 



First Rep. Regional 
Opens Here Tuesday 



(Continued from Page 1) 

campaign on Roy Rogers, and pro- 
motion plans for such forthcoming 
pix as "Someone To Remember," 
"In Old Oklahoma," "Gay Blades," 
and "The Fighting SeaBees." 

Grainger will preside at . the New York 
sessions and Eastern District Sales Manager 
Maxwell Gillis and Central District Sales 
Manager Sam Seplowin will head a contingent 
of exchangemen from these two districts: 
Arthur Newman, Albany; Jack Davis, Bos- 
ton; Sam Seletsky, New Haven; Morris Ep- 
stein and Sidney Picker, New York; Joseph 
Ensrel. Philadelphia; Jack Bellmanv Buffalo; 
Sam P. Gorrel, Cleveland; G. H. Kirby, Cin- 
cinnati: I. H. Pollard, Detroit; L. W. Mar- 
riott, Indianapolis; and Franchise Holders 
Jake Flax, Washington, and J. H. Alexander 
and Sam Fineberg, Pittsburgh. 

Directly after the New York meeting. 
Grainger will leave for Chicago where a 
sales meeting will be held July 16-17, at 
the Drake Hotel. Midwestern District Sales 
Manager E. L. Walton and Southern District 
Sales Manager Merritt Davis wih be present, 
as will the following Republic Branch Man- 
agers; Will Baker, Chicago; J. G. Frackman, 
Milwaukee; W. M. Grant, Minneapolis; F. 
R. Moran, Des Moines; Harry Lefholtz. 
Omaha; Nat Steinberg, St. Louis; Winfield 
Snelson, Atlanta; Harold Laird Tampa; J. 
H. Dillon, Charlotte; N. J. Colquhoun, Mem- 
phis; L. V. Seicshnaydre, New Orleans; Lloyd 
Rust, Dallas: Russell J. Brown. Oklahoma 
City; and Franchise Holder Robert F. 
Withers. Kansas City. 

At the studio meeting, to be held July 
22-23, Grainger will be- joined by Studio 
Head M. J. Siegel and Western District Sales 
Manager F. A. Bateman. Fcl'owing exchange 
men will be present: Franchise Holder J. 
T. Sheffield of the Northwest territory; 
Branch Managers F. H. Higgins, Seattle; 
J. H. Sheffield, Portland; Gcn3 Gerbase, Den- 
ver; H. C. Fuller, Salt Lake City: John Frey, 
Los Angeles; and Sid Weisbaum, San Fran- 
cisco. 



Clearance Cuts Sought 
For Basil Bros. Houses 



Conn. Delivery Cuts 
Add to Bookers' Woes 



New Haven — Delivery systems 
have further curtailed service this 
week, to add to the difficulty of 
bookers. Decker's eliminated Friday 
and Sunday service, as did Rosen's. 
In addition Rosen's reported no ser- 
vices hereafter for Middletown Mon- 
day and Wednesday nights, for Wal- 
rington, Wednesday nights, for 
Torrinton, Wednesday nights, for 
Rockville Monday nights, for Oak- 
ville and Watertown Tuesday and 
Thursday. Hoxie's serves Winsted 
and Lakeville now on Monday, Wed- 
nesday and Friday only; Kimmer- 
lin no Bridgeport service Monday, 
and Foley's goes to Canaan Monday, 
Tuesday, Thursday and Friday only. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

name all five distributors. In Nia- 
gara Falls, Basil Bros, asks that 
the 35 days' clearance granted the 
Strand, Cataract and Bellevue over 
circuit's LaSalle be reduced to 30 
days.. Buffalo complaint asks that 
the four to 10 days granted Schine's 
Granada Over the Varsity be elimi- 
nated, so that the Varsity can play 
pictures immediately after the Gra- 
nada. 



Allied Caravan Talking 
Rentals at Cincy Today 

(Continued from Page 1) ": 

Caravan. The meeting embraces 
Southern Ohio and Northern Ken- 
tucky exhibitors and will discuss 
movement for lower film rentals. 



Iowa Merchants Take 
Over Theater Operation 

Kimballtown, la. — Local merchants 
have ttaken over the operation of 
the Viking theater. The house for- 
merly was run by Sid Peterson. 



Cantor in Stamp Drive P.A." 

Eddit Cantor returns to the RKO 
Palace at 2 p.m. today to aid the 
Treasury Department's July Stamp 
Drive. 



NYC 






I NC 
S T 




$ You are compensated 
for these showings. 



' : 



YOUR THEATRE TODAY . . . like the Town Hall of yesterday 
... is the Meeting Place for Community Security. It is the focus of 
civilian performance. 

YOUR THEATRE SCREEN today projects a dual influence on 
the morale of your community. It relaxes and reassures . . . informs 
and inspires. 

TO HELP YOU to help Uncle Sam, by helping your community... 
while helping yourself*. . SCREEN BROADCASTS has been selected 
by War Savings, OCD, OPA, Public Health, Labor, ODT and other 
agencies in Washington to bring a series of Community Security 
Campaigns to your audience through sponsored presentation by 
national, sectional and local concerns. 

THESE FILMS are a brand new approach in screen advertising. 

— — They are the first and only ever 

produced under government 
supervision and approved for 
sponsorship on theatre screens. 
They entertain because they 
enlighten and encourage. 

EACH CAMPAIGN includes 26 subjects, one to be screened 
every other week. Each complete subject is less than one minute and 
is introduced by a government agency title. The sponsor's identity is 
confined to a simple credit signature at the end. 

IF YOU WANT your theatre to take and hold the lead in pro- 
viding greater security for your community, as thousands of theatres 
are already doing, fill in and mail this reply form today. 



- 



SCREEN BROADCASTS 



'>■■'■ ;• : ' / , • ' ,'.1V 



923 13th Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



p 



-- 



r— i Send your Theatre Relations Representative to see me and explain 
the details of these Community Security Campaigns. 

(ZI I want to see the films in this series when your representative calls. 



DISTRIBUTED— In Southern, Atlantic and New England 
States by Motion Picture Advertising Service Co., Inc., 
New Orleans, Louisiana. 

In Northern, Mid-Western and Western States by United 
Film Service, Inc., Kansas City, Missouri. 



Theatre or Eihibitor's Firm Name 



Owner or Manager 



Street Address 



State 



DO NOT REMOVE 



Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 




The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



-1FDAIIY 



\* 



)L. 84, NO. 5 



NEW YORK, THURSDAY. JULY 8, 1943 



TEN CENTS 



QUICK JXHIB. REACTION TO DIVORCEMENT 

Schine Asks Relief from Theater Disposal Order 



Retention of Theaters 
Implements Competition, 
Schine Counsel Declares 



By J. HOWARD GARNISH 

FILM DAILY Staff Correspondent 
Buffalo — Declaring it was "an out- 
rageous act of oppression "for the 
Government to require the Schine 
defendants to attempt to sell 16 
theater interests they had acquired 
since the filing of the D of J's anti- 
trust suit against them, while per- 
mitting the producer-distributor-ex- 
hibitor defendants, who were parties 
to the New York consent decree, to 
retain more than 200 theaters after 

(Continued on Page 9) 



See Mexico Training 
Field for Pix Execs. 



Mexico City (By Air Mail) — Mex- 
ico as a training field for American 
film distribution personnel and ex- 
ecutives is looming large in the post- 
war scheme of things, it is learned 
here. 

First moves in that direction are 
reported made- by three American 
companies — Warners, 20th-Fox and 
{Continued on Page 10) 



WB Midwestern District 
Head to be Named Today 

Chicago — Second of the three reg- 
ional sales meetings being held by 
Warners this year will get under 
way this morning in the Blackstone 
Hotel, with Ben Kalmenson, general 

(Continued on Page 10) 



Argentina May Bar 
U. S. Anti-Axis Pix 

Buenos Aires (By Air Mail, Passed 
by Censor) — Pending a stand on the 
Government's general attitude toward 
foreign films, decision on the admit- 
tance of U. S. films with political 
backgrounds has been delayed. It 
is expected that films which openly 
attack Axis nations will not be shown 
in Argentina. 



TO MEET IN CAPITAL ON OWI FUTURE 

Elmer Davis and E. Palmer Hoyt Will Confer With 
Representatives of the film Industry 



By ANDREW H. OLDER 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — A meeting of repre- 
sentatives of the motion picture in- 
dustry with OWI Director Elmer 
Davis and Domestic Director E. Pal- 
mer Hoyt will probably be held next 
week here, it was revealed yester- 
day. 

An official of domestic branch of 



OWI was considerably embarrassed 
when asked if Lowell Mellett, mo- 
tion picture bureau chief, would also 
be on hand for the meeting. He de- 
clined to answer. The entire matter 
of industry co-operation with the 
OWI and vice versa will be gone over, 
and it is probable that the plans for 
the future of the OWI motion pic- 

(Continued on Page 7) 



20lh-Fox Sets 15 
Pix; Minor A's Out 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Twentieth-Fox, whol- 
ly eliminating minor A's as well as 
B's from its production program, 
will send 15 top pix before the cam- 
eras during the next four months 
following the return of Col. Darryl 
F. Zanuck, it was announced yes- 
terday by Joseph M. Schenck. 

Three of the 15, titles of which 
(Continued on Page 8) 



Denies Motion to Dismiss 
Ascap Anti-Trust Suit 



New York Federal Judge Henry 
W. Goddard yesterday denied a mo- 
tion by Ascap to dismiss the anti- 
trust action brought against it, Gene 
Buck, Irving Berlin, Inc., and Carl 
(Continued on Page 5) 



A. G. Allen Resigns 
As ABC's Chairman 



London — Resignation of A. G. Al- 
len, DSO, MC, as chairman of As- 
sociated British Cinemas, Ltd., one 
of the major British theater circuits, 
was announced yesterday without ex- 
planation. 

News of Allen's departure from 
ABC stirred lively trade speculation, 
with some Wardour St. quarters in- 
clined to link the resignation with 

(Continued on Page 7) 



New 20th-Fox 100,000-Share 
Issue Sold in Few Hours 



The new issue of 100,000 shares 
of prior preferred stock of 20th-Fox 
was entirely sold out yesterday with- 
in several hours after it was placed 
on the market, it was reported last 
(Continued on Page 8) 



Trade to Aid New Bond Drive 

Plan Participation at Early New York Meeting 



"There Goes Lena Henry" 
First by Bogeaus for UA 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — /First of three pic- 
tures to be produced by Ben Bogeaus 
for United Artists will be "There 
Goes Lena Henry," from the novel 
by Polan Banks. Bogeaus, presi- 
(Continued on Page 8) 



Washington Bureau, of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Nation-wide indus- 
try participation in the giant third 
War Bond drive planned for Sep- 
tember will probably be announced 
later this month. A meeting may be 
held in New York between the Treas- 
ury Department and WAC officials 
within the next 10 days, in which 
(Continued on Page 5) 



"Just as Wrong as Ever/' 
Kuykendall; Myers Favors 
Senate Hearings in Fall 

Re-introduction of the Neely 
theater divorcement bill in the 
U. S. Senate by West Virginia's 
senior senator, Harley M. Kilgore, 
under agreement with the Depart- 
ment of Justice brought quick reac- 
tions yesterday from the senior of- 
ficers of the two national exhibitor 
organizations. 

Ed Kuykendall, MPTOA prexy, in 
response to an invitation from The 
Film Daily to comment, castigated 
the bill in his telegraphed reply 
from Columbus, Miss., and asserted 
that "sane-thinking exhibitors every- 

(Continued on Page 10) 

Lensmen Acclaim 3rd 
Dimension Pic Tests 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Tests reported to be 
revolutionary have been completed 
by four top cameramen on Polyscope, 
trade name for a machine to pro- 
duce third dimensional pictures. The 
quartette completing tests of the 
machine, of which James McMahon, 
assistant director at Warner Bros. 
(Continued on Page 5) 

Cowan Company Plan 
Links Stage and Pix 

Lester Cowan is working on plans 
for a company to put on plays picked 
for their picture possibilities. The 
company, which would be headed by 
Cowan, would do away with the 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Hollywood Pictures 
Send Circulation Up 

Chicago — In the face of the ac- 
tion by some newspapers in material- 
ly curtailing space devoted to films 
and theaters, the Daily News here 
has added two pages of Hollywood 
pictures each day to the evening edi- 
tions. Paper reports a healthy cir- 
culation response. 



;M 



Thursday, July 8, 1943 



DAILY 




Vol. 84, No. 5 Thurs., July 8, 1943 10 Cents 



JOHN W. ALICOATE 



: Publisher 



DONALD M. MERSEREAU : General Manager 



CHESTER B. BAHN : : 



: Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y.. under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address- 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif- 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco-Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



cominG URD G0IHG 



RICHARD F. WALSH, IATSE head, returned 
to town yesterday from a Western trip. 

LOUIS NIZER leaves tomorrow for a vaca- 
tion. 

DON CARLE CILETTE, WB trade press con- 
tact, is in Chicago. 

DEWEY D. BLOOM, M-C-M exploitation 
representative in Canada, pulls into town next 
week for conferences with William R. Fergu- 
son, the company's exploitation manager. 

MONROE GOODMAN, former assistant to 
Oscar Morgan at Paramount, is in town on leave 
from his Air Force duties at Kelly Field, Tex. 

GEORGE FREEMAN, manager of Loew's Poli, 
Springfield, Mass., is in Hampton Beach, N. H., 
for his vacation. 

E. C. GRAINGER is on a swing around the 
Shea circuit. 

WILLIAM RESNICK, writer for the Emerson 
Yorke studio, is back from a research trip 
through Indiana on the documentary film "Edu- 
cation for Living." 

SIDNEY SHELDON and BEN ROBERTS, screen 
writers, are here from the Coast. 



TED O'SHEA, M-G-M Eastern division man- 
ager; HAROLD POSTMAN, assistant to Wil- 
liam F. iRodgers, distribution head of the com- 
pany, and EDWIN W. AARON, circuit sales 
manager, leave for Cincinnati today to partici- 
pate in the firm's sales analysis session there. 
They'll be away for a few days. 

ANITA LOUISE was at Camp Campbell, 
Clarksville, Tenn., yesterday in her voluntary 
USO-Camps Shows tour which ends at Camp 
Lee, Va., on July 14. 

ANNE ROONEY today starts an engagement 
at Fort Riley, Abilene, Kan., on the second 
leg of her USO-Camp Shows tour which closes 
on July 23 at Camp Campbell, Clarksville, Tenn. 

JULES FIELDS of the 20th-Fox exploitation 
department is back from a 10-day trip to St. 
Louis. 

JEANNE HESS of the 20th-Fox publicity and 
exploitation department has returned from a 
vacation in Chicago. 

ERNIE CROUCH, who has been helping out 
at Schine's Dixie in Rochester, N. Y., returns 
this week to his post at the Schine house in 
Auburn. 



Canadian Service Shots 
For Dominion Newsreels 



Montreal — Canadian men and wo- 
men in the services at home and 
abroad will be featured in Dominion 
news reels, after July 22, according 
to plans just completed by Oscar 
Hanson, president of Pioneer Films. 

Pioneer is launching a fast trans- 
Atlantic film service which, it is/ 
pected, will eliminate further C\^ 
adian criticism that newsreels ex- 
hibited here stress U. S. military op- 
erations. 



Briggs, Greenblatt and 
Lefton to Coast Tomorrow 



FINANCIAL 



(Wednesday, July 7) 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 

High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat 16% 16i/ 4 163/ 8 + Vs 

Col. Picts. vtc. (2'/2%> 17V4 171/s 17'/ 8 — 3 /s 

Columbia Picts. pfd 

Con. Fm. Ind 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd.. 17l/ 2 17ft 17ft + V 4 

East. Kodak 165 165 165 ..... 

do pfd 180 1793/4 17934 — 1/4 

Gen Prec. Eq 22l/ 4 22 22 — 1/4 

Loew's, Inc 60ft 60 60ft — H/ 4 

Paramount 283/ 4 277/ 8 283/ 8 

RKO 9 8% 9 

RKO $6 pfd 943/4 941/4 94ft— 1/4 

20th Century-Fox .. 21ft 20% 21 ft 

20th Century-Fox pfd. 32ft 3 2 1/4 32ft + ft 

Univ. Pict. pfd 

Warner Bros 15 14% 15 

do pfd 893/ 8 891/4 893/ 8 + ft 

NEW YORK BONO MARKET 

Para. B'way 3s55 

Para. Picts. deb. 4s56 

Warner Bros.' dbs. 6s48 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 
Monogram Picts. ... 35/ 8 3ft 3% + ft 

Radio-Keith cvs 1% 1% 1% ..... 

Sonotone Corp 33,4 3ft 3% + 1/4 

Technicolor 13 12% 13 

Trans-Lux 

Universal Corp. vtc 

Universal Picts 

N. Y. OVER-THE-COUNTER SECURITIES 

Bid Asked 

Met. Playhouse, Inc. 2nd deb. '45 

Roxy Thea. Bldg. 4s 1st '57 763,4 79ft 



O. Henry Briggs, president of 
PRC, Arthur Greenblatt, vice-presi- 
dent in charge of sales, and Nat 
Lefton, Cleveland and Cincinnati 
franchise holder and recently ap- 
pointed district manager for Pitts- 
burgh, Detroit, Cincinnati and Cleve- 
land, leave tomorrow for Hollywood, 
where they will confer with Leon 
Fromkess, production chief, and 
PRC producers on production of the 
1943-44 program. 

From Hollywood, Greenblatt will 
make a swing through the entire 
Western and Southwestern territor- 
ies. The sales chief of PRC will re- 
turn to New York about Aug. 15. 

Briggs will remain in Hollywood 
for several weeks, returning to New 
York about Aug. 1. 



Predicts FM Television 
Advance After the War 




What the television industry ex- 
pects as a post-war development, 
according to Paul Chamberlain of 
GE's electronics department, is the 
rapid advancement of FM broadcast- 
ing stations which he believes will 
replace many low-powered AM sta- 
tions now handicapped by interfer- 



Gov't Shorts at Each Show 
Or No Waiving Overtime 



Syracuse— IATSE Local 376, op- 
erators, has served notice on all 
houses here that the practice of 
waiving overtime resulting from the 
screening of Government shorts has 
been eliminated except in instances 
where the programs are made up in 
strict compliance with the policy of 
showing the shorts as part of each 
show. 

The union charges that some 
houses have been "chiseling" time 
bv eliminating the Government 
shorts from all except the last show 
at night, thereby getting more film 
run and avoiding payment of over- 
time by blaming the shorts with tak- 
ing up the extra running time. 



Republic Takes 200 Chi. 
Billboards to Boost Rogers 



Chicago — Republic has taken 200 
billboard stands in the Chicago ter- 
ritory boosting Roy Rogers film drive 
and his personal appearance next 
week with his "Song of Texas" film 
at the Oriental Theater. Three radio 
stations will be used. 



NEW YORK 
THEATERS 



Nathan Rosen $85,854 
Estate Goes to Widow 



1600 
, BROADWAY 
"""»»*' \ %a^ / N.T.C 

MUVHt M«VI« \^ y {J,,,, -00ll-2-)-4 

tfOtAOI I C A. nOJICttOH HOOM RIM EXCHANGE OlSKIIUIION StfVICE 



AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 

Theater Manager — Steady 

Age 47 — Married 

Excellent References 

Prefer Times Sq. or 

Midtown Area 

Please State Minimum Salary 

Box 166— Film Daily 
1501 Broadway— New York City 



Miami Beach, Fla. — An inventory 
filed in probate court revealed that 
Nathan Rosen, retired Pittsburgh 
theater owner, left an estate of 
$85,854.02 when he died a little 
over a vear ago. Of this amount 
1511,126.62 was in the Iron City 
Amusement Co. of Pittsburgh, and 
his interests in the Granada and 
Model Theaters in Pittsburgh was 
listed at $55,103.42. Entire estate 
was left to his wife. Mrs. Anna 
Rosen, who has aualified as execu- 
trix and who resides at the family 
home in Miami Beach. 



Margaret M. Bleakley 
Named Joe Shea Aide 



RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL 

ROCKEFELLER CENTER 

THE YOUNGEST PROFESSION' 

with 

VIRGINIA WEIDLER, EDWARD ARNOLD 

and Five Important Guest Stars 

AN M-G-M PICTURE 

NEW MARCH OF TIME 

Gala Stage Revue • Symphony Orchestra 

First Mezzanine Seats Reserved. Circle 6-4600 



J^C BETTY GRABLE -fc 

GEORGE MONTGOMERY* CESAR ROMERO 

Come? isiand 

A JOTH CENTURr-FOX fICTURE in TECHNICOLOR 

* PLUS A BIG STAGE SHOW * 

BUY |J ^\ ■%#• W 7ihAVE. 

BONDS K V A I 50th ST. 



"DIXIE" * In Person 

with ~k ANDREWS SISTERS 

BING CROSBY "k TIM HERBERT 

DOROTHY LAMOUR -fc MITCHELL AYRES 

A Paramount Picture -»V and his orchestra 

Cool PARAMOUNT Times Square 



B'WAY & 

47th St. 



Humphrey Bogart • Raymond Massey 

"ACTION IN NORTH ATLANTIC" 

and 

"PRAIRIE CHICKENS" 

JIMMY ROGERS . NOAH BEERY, JR. 



Margaret M. Bleaklev has joined 
William Cagney Productions in New 
York as assistant to Joseph Shea, 
Eastern -publicity representative and 
story editor. Miss Bleakley was 
formerly associated with the storv 
departments of David O. Selznick 
and Hunt Stromberg Productions. 



££& STATE 



ON SCREEN 
JEAN ARTHUR 
JOEL McCREA 

"THE MORE 
THE MERRIER' 







^4 



OBi ' ^ 



r^$ 



i \ 



¥ 







Metro- Goldwyn- Mayer's Technicolorful Musical Comedy "DU BARRY WAS A LADY" 
inspires artist Shermund o£ Esquire Magazine to paint this impression of the Du Barry Girl. 



We don't expect you to read a single word of this advertisement with all the dazzling darlings of "Du 
Barry Was A Lady" running over the page like mad. It's too much to ask of anyone to concentrate on 
Technicolor and who wrote it and things like that except that Red Skelton is so funny and Lucille Ball 




Dm-B 






so gorgeous and Gene Kelly such a volcanic Ancer that you'd never forgive us if we neglected to tell 
you about them — not to mention deadpan Virginia O'Brien and comic 'Rags' Ragland and the cafe society 
hit Zero Mostel plus guess who and his band ... of course it's popular Tommy Dorsey playing torchy tunes 










by Cole Porter and others. All in all, now that you're reading this ad.. .or have you stopp|d...it's the big- 
gest eyeful of money show in years and promoted in big magazine campaigns, newspaplr teaser ads for 
months, full pages in Esquire and American Weekly. And nationwide Sunday Supplement ads 3 weeks 







in a row synchronized with July release. Screenplay by Irving Brecher, adapted by Nancy Hamilton, 
additional dialogue by Wilkie Mahoney, directed by Roy del Ruth, produced by Arthur Freed. And re- 
member "Du Barry Was A Lady" is just one of M-G-M's 4th great Group, "Seven From Heaven." 



Let's Keep 

Selling Bonds ! 



Thursday, J 



ursday, July 8, 1943 



<W 



DAILY 



Trade to Participate 
In 3rd War Bond Drive 



(Continued from Page 1) 

preliminary plans will be set. Pro- 
duction of a special short subject 
for nation-wide showing and elab- 
orate use of the newsreels are under 
\ JVsideration as an aid to the drive. 
_^here is a strong possibility that 
plans for the industry's part in the 
drive may be announced by Secre- 
tary Henry Morgenthau, Jr., when 
he addresses the recently-formed 
Entertainment Council later this 
month or early in August. The date 
for Morgenthau's appearance has 
not definitely been set, although he 
does not plan to address the Council. 
The September drive is expected to 
have a goal nearly twice that of the 
giant April drive, when $13,000,000,- 
000 was the objective and $18,000,- 
000,000 was realized. 

Although there was no theater participa- 
tion in the last drive on a national scale, 
theaters did do a "tremendous job." accord- 
ing- to Carlton Duffus of the War Saving's 
staff. He mentioned particularly the ac- 
tivities carried on through local WAC 
branches in Minneapolis, Denver, Des Moines. 
Wisconsin and New England, as well as the 
current July drive for enough Bonds to 
purchase a bomber or at least a fighter for 
every county in Arkansas, being carried on 
in theaters in that state through the WAC. 

Duffus is going on vacation next week, 
and the New York meeting may be handled 
by Ted Gamble, national director of war 
savings and a former Oregon exhibitor. 




Denies Motion to Dismiss 
Ascap Anti-Trust Suit 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Fischer, Inc., by 150 independent 
theater operators, who claim that 
the defendants conspired to fix lic- 
ense fees charged the plaintiffs for 
the privilege of using musical com- 
positions in conjunction with the 
exhibition of motion pictures. The 
court refused to strike out Ascap's 
assertion that the plaintiffs came 
into the case with "unclean hands." 
The plaintiffs are suing for a to- 
tal of approximately $600,000. 



Cantor at Palace Today 

Rain yesterday forced Eddie Can- 
tor to postpone to this afternoon his 
appearance at the Palace to aid the 
July war stamp drive. 



"Corregidor" in RKO Houses 

RKO's metropolitan circuit will 
play PRC's "Corregidor." 




Lon Young Eugene Pallette 

Bradley King 



A Bernhard Story, Etc. 

9 • • IN one of the lighter moments of his talk at the opening ses- 
sion of the first Warner regional sales meet in New York, Joseph Bernhard, 
vice-prexy, gave an anecdotal description of the WB salesman, — the 
type who has obtained more biz with fewer pix than was ever done 

before Joe told of the super-strong man who took half a lemon in 

his hand and squeezed all the, juice out of it Then he offered $100 

to any member of his audience who could squeeze out another drop 

Several tried and failed Finally an unobtrusive little fellow edged 

up to the strong man, took the piece of mashed lemon in his hand, gave 

it a good squeeze, — and out came three drops The strong man 

looked at the stranger in amazement and asked, "Who are you?" 

And the stranger nonchalantly replied, "I'm a Warner salesman" 

T ▼ T 

• • • ANENT the House of Warner, Roy Haines, company's 
Southern and Western sales manager, tells this one about Robert Smeltz- 

er, mid-Atlantic district manager: Bob went to the bank t'other 

day to take inventory of his safe deposit box contents Among the 

documents therein, Bob found a 1918 Liberty Bond which he had for- 
gotten to cash in y y T 

• • • SERGT. DAVE GOLDING, who left THE FUM DAILY to don 
olive drab, is now managing editor of the Algiers daily edition of the Stars 
and Stripes T T T 

9 m 9 BIZ AND SOCIAL: Up in the Chrysler Building's 

Cloud Club at 5:15 p.m. today, March of Time will tender a buffet 
supper so's the press can meet Howard Black, vice-prexy of Time, Inc., 
recently named to take charge of M of T sales and distribution policies 

Just prior to the reception, company will screen the latest M of T 

issue, "Bill Jack vs. Adolph Hitler". ... 9 On next Monday evening 
at 7:45 in the Waldorf-Astoria, Walt Disney, Albert D. Lasker and Elsa 
Maxwell will co-host a buffet dinner in honor of Major Alexander P. 
de Seversky, to be followed by film preview of "Victory Through Air 
Power". ... 9 And on the next night at 8:45 is the invitation preview 
at the Rivoli of Paramount's "For Whom the Bell Tolls". . . 9 Speak- 
ing of the social end of things, John McManus, manager of the Midland 
Theater out Kansas City way, stood in the lobby of that stand t'other 
day and lamped a dowerish woman entering the auditorium with a dog 

on a leash "I'm very sorry, Madame," protested John, "but dogs 

aren't allowed in our theater" Then the woman haughtily de- 
manded that her money be refunded, which John did But the 

dame wasn't through with McManus With sternest dignity, she 

looked the manager up and down and scorched: "I wouldn't be sur- 
prised if my dog's social position were superior to yours anyway!". . . . 
9 Down in the nation's capital this afternoon a cocktail party will 
be held in the Variety Club to signalize installation of 20th-Fox's new 
branch manager, C. E. "Pep" Peppiatt, with Andy Smith, company's 
Eastern sales manager, officiating 

▼ TV 

• • • WITH biggest drive of camp tours in industry annals under 
way, M-G-M alone has 21 stars on tour, about to tour, or just returning 
Just in from camps throughout the land are Mickey Rooney, Spenc- 
er Tracy, Donald Meek, Marjorie Main, Frances Gifford, William Gargan, 

Leee Bowman and Chill Wills Now entertaining the armed forces 

are Judy Garland, Red Skelton, Charles Laughton, Robert Young, Philip 

Dom and Edward Arnold Soon to embark are Kathryn Grayson, 

Marsha Hunt, Ruth Hussey, Walter Pidgeon, Frances Gifford (her second 
trip), Ann Sothern and Laraine Day Tops for a single studio! 

▼ ▼ ▼ 

• • • AVENGE PEARL HARBOR! 



DATE BOOK 



regional sales meeting, 



July 6-10: Warners 
Chicago. 

July 12-14: RKO Radio sales meeting, Waldorf- 
Astoria. 

July 13-14: Republic regional, New York A. C. 

July 14-15: Conference Board of National Con- 
ference of the Entertainment Industry for 
War Activities meets at Actors Equity. 

July 14-17: Paramount semi-annual sales meet- 
ing, Hotel Pierre. 

regional sales meeting, 



July 15-17: Warner' 
San Francisco. 



regional, Drake Hotel, 
regional, North Holly- 



July 16-17: Republic 

Chicago. 
July 22-23: Republic 

wood studios. 

July 28-29: Kansas-Missouri Theaters Association 
convention, Kansas City. 

July 29: Loew's stockholders special meeting, 
home office. 

Aug. 11-12: Allied board meeting, Baltimore. 
Sept. 9: ITOA installation luncheon, Hotel 
Astor. 



Lensmen Acclaim 3rd 
Dimension Pic Tests 



(Continued from Page 1) 

is owner-in-trust, are Bert Glen- 
non, Greg Toland, Ray June and 
Norbert Brodine. 

They report complete satisfaction 
with the machine, invented by W. F. 
Alder in 1940. The principal ad- 
vantage of Polyscope, its back- 
ers point out, is that it may be used 
in conjunction with regular cameras, 
with no change-overs necessary. 
Among other things, the machine 
eliminates the necessity of back 
lighting, a time-wasting bugaboo of 
present-day shooting. 



Willhie On Air Sat. 
Against Race Violence 

Wendell L. Willkie, chairman of 
the board of 20th-Fox, will lead the 
list of personalities scheduled to 
appear Satur- 
day night on 
a CBS broad- 
cast denounc- 
ing the fo- 
menting of ra- 
cial violence 
in America. 
Among the 
sponsors of 
the broadcast 
are Maxwell 
Anderson, 
Tallulah Bank- 
head, Ralph 
Bellamy, Ilka 
Chase, Jane 
Cowl, Georgia Gibbs, Gypsy Rose 
Lee, Paul Muni, Arch Oboler, Jimmy 
Savo, Hazel Scott, Kenneth Spenc- 
er, Lawrence Tibbett, Elmer Rice. 
The broadcast is the first event 
to be staged by the newly organ- 
ized Entertainment Industry Emerg- 
ency Committee in its campaign 
against racial bias. 




WENDELL L. WILLKIE 



«M 



Thursday, July 8, 1943 



DAILY 



* > Reviews of the new rums & -v 



"Victory Through Air 
Power" 

UA-Disney 65 Mins. 

DISNEY DOES SUPERB JOB WITH FILM 
VERSION OF SEVERSKY BOOK; TIMELY 
PIC DESERVES WIDE AUDIENCE. 

Walt Disney has applied every resource 
of his art to make the screen treatment 
of Major Alexander P. de Seversky's book, 
"Victory Through Air Power," an achieve- 
ment fully worthy of his name. All the 
devices of the animator's craft have been 
employed with powerful effect to bring 
home the message contained in the Seversky 
tome — namely, that only the right use of 
aerial might will gain us the decisive 
triumph in our struggle against the Axis. 

Despite the fine job Disney has done in 
transferring Seversky's ideas to celluloid 
one cannot get away from the question of 
whether the film represents entertainment 
in the sense that picture fans have come 
to accept it. Humor is at a minimum and 
is confined to that portion of the film deal- 
ing with the history of aviation. "Victory 
Through Air Power" is Disney in a more 
serious mood — which is understandable con- 
sidering the vital significance of the sub- 
ject. The timeliness of the film and the 
publicity that has accrued to the Seversky 
book provide exploitable points in selling 
the picture to the public. 

"Victory Through Air Power" is a picture 
that calls for the abandonment of old- 
time notions of entertainment in its evalua- 
tion. It must be weighed by maturer stand- 
ards for the sake of its message — in this 
instance a message of supreme importance 
— a message that touches the welfare of 
every individual arrayed against the Axis 
powers. Every person seriously interested 
in victory against the Axis owes it to him- 
self to see the film. This is a point the 
exhibitor can stress with profit to him- 
self in selling the picture to his patrons. 

Despite its seriousness the film manages 
to be absorbing at all times. It puts over 
its message with remarkable clarity and 
commendable simplicity. Diagrams have 
never been used with more striking effect, 
nor with greater cleverness. Disney uses 
them dramatically to illustrate Seversky's 
concepts of air force as a weapon of vic- 
tory. 

After the film has sketched the develop- 
ment of the airplane the screen is given over 
to Seversky himself. The heir to General 
Billy Mitchell's theories on the value of air 
power expounds his ideas with an incisive- 
ness and an authority that make it easy 
to see why through the air lies the United 
Nations' path to victory. Seversky shows 
in detail how long-range bombing by land- 
based aviation will blast the Axis out of the 
war. He presents his case impressively and 
eloquently, driving home his argument with 
devastating logic. Seversky explains at 
length why trying to lick the Axis by any 
other means than air power properly applied 
will be a long and arduous task calling for a 
heavy cost in lives and gold. He points 
out the need for a united American air 
force under separate command. 

The film, in which Technicolor has been 
used to fine alvantage, represents a grand 
job of animation. 

Hats are off to all who had a finger in 
the making of the picture. 

CREDITS: Producer, Walt Disney, Pro- 



"Isle of Forgotten Sins" 

with John Carradine and Gale Sondergaard 

(HOLLYWOOD PREVIEW 
PRC 82 Mins. 

ACTION-PACKED SOUTH SEAS MELO- 
DRAMA OFFERS PLENTY OF ENTER- 
TAINMENT. 

Here is an ambitious offering in the 
modest budget field. This melodrama of 
the South Seas has plenty of action, 
and has been well directed by Edgar G. 
Ulmer, who also wrote the original story. 
Peter R. Van Duinen provided excellent 
production values and Raymond L. Schrock 
wrote the screenplay. Ira H. Morgan con- 
tributed splendid photography. 

John Carradine and Frank Fenton, ex- 
pert deep sea-divers, learn the location of 
a liner that was scuttled by its captain, 
Sidney Toler, and its purser, Rick Vallin. 
In the hold of the sunken boat is $3,000- 
000 in gold. 

Toler and Vallin deliberately bait Carra- 
dine and Fenton, determined to high- 
jack the gold from the ambitious deep- 
sea divers. When the treasure is finally 
brought to the surface, Toler, Vallin and 
their henchmen overpower the divers and 
take the loot from them. 

Toler and Vallin quarrel over the spoils 
and kill each other. A monsoon sweeps 
away the treasure, but Fenton, Carradine 
and his sweetheart, Gale Sondergaard, 
are saved. 

CAST: John Carradine, Gale Sondergaard, 
Sidney Toler, Frank Fenton, Veda Ann 
Borg, Rita Quigley, Rick Vallin, Betty 
Amann, Tala Birell, Patti McCarty, Marian 
Colby, William Edmonds. 

CREDITS: Producer, Peter R. Van Duinen; 
Leon Fromkess in charge of Production; 
Director, Edgar G. Ulmer; Author, Raymond 
L. Schrock; Screenplay, same; Based on 
story by Edgar G. Ulmer; Cameraman, Ira 
Morgan; Editor, Charles Henkel, Jr.; Art 
Director, Fred Preble; Dialogue Director, 
Ben Kamsler; Special effects, Gene Stone; 
Music, Leo Erdody. 

DIRECTION, Excellent PHOTOGRAPHY, 
Excellent. 



Cowan Company Plan 
Links Stage and Pix 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Broadway producer. The set-up en- 
visioned by Cowan calls for him to 
function as the direct representa- 
tive of the film companies them- 
selves, replacing the current prac- 
tice of backing individual producers. 



duction Manager, Dan Keefe; Scenes with 
Major Seversky directed by H. C. Potter; 
Animation Supervisor, David Hand; Story 
Direction, Perce Pearce; Story Adaptation, 
T. Hee, Erdman Penner, William Cottrell, 
Jim Bodrero, George Stallings, Jose Rodri- 
quez; Sequence Directors, Clyde Geronomi, 
Jack Kinney, James Algar; Cameraman, Ray 
Hennehan; Art Director, Richard Irvine; 
Sound Recorders, C. O. Sly field, Lodge 
Cunningham; Film Editor, Jack Dennis; 
Interior Decoration, William Kiernan; Nar- 
rator, Art Baker; Musical Score, Edward 
Plumb, Paul J. Smith, Oliver Wallace. 

DIRECTION, Fine. PHOTOGRAPHY, 
Fine. 



"Gals, Incorporated" 

with Leon Errol, Harriet Hilliard, 

Grace McDonald 

Universal 61 Mins. 

STRONG ON TUNEFULNESS BUT 
MUSICAL WEAK ON COMEDY, SHOULD 
GET FAIR RESPONSE FROM YOUNG 
FOLKS. 

"Gals, Incorporated" fails to incorporate 
enough good material to get it by in the 
neighborhoods without a lot of plugging. 
It is a mild little musical which will have 
to rest its case almost wholly on its song 
content — which means that the film's appeal 
is directed primarily to adolescents. For- 
tunately the tunes are peppy and numer- 
ous, there being 13 of them. The film 
is weakest in the comedy department, 
despite the presence of Leon Errol in the 
cast. The gags are pretty old and badly 
put over with the result that laughs are 
few and far between. 

The film is helped by the breezy way 
in which it has been directed by Leslie 
Goodwins, who obtained better results 
than the script warranted. Also an aid 
are the attractive settings provided by John 
Goodman. 

Among the chief attractions of the 
picture are the Pied Pipers and Glen Gray 
and his Casa Loma Orchestra. These two 
aggregations, plus the singing of some of 
the principals, will keep the young ones 
reasonably entertained. 

The story is a silly and thoroughly in- 
consequential affair. The title refers to 
a night club backed by Errol, wealthy 
playboy, and wholly manned (if that is 
the word) by lovely gals. When Errol's 
sister (Minna Phillips) threatens to part 
the comedian from his inheritance unless 
he is remarried and behaves himself, the gals 
come to the rescue by inducing one of their 
number (Grace McDonald) to pose as his 
wife. Complications arise when Errol's son 
by a former marriage, a Marine makes 
his appearance. Miss McDonald falls in 
love with the lad (David Bacon) but can't 
do anything about it without exposing the 
whole plot. Harriet Hilliard, a cat, tries 
to grab the youth for herself, but true 
love conquers in the end after everything 
has been straightened out. 

The cast does the best it can under the 
circumstances. Will Cowan acted as as- 
sociate producer. Edward Dein pleads 
guilty to the authorship of the screenplay, 
which was suggested by a story by Dave 
Gould and Charles Marion. 

CAST: Leon Errol, Harriet Hilliard, David 
Bacon, Maureen Cannon, Betty Keane, 
Vicki Cornell, Minna Phillips, Grace Mc- 
Donald, Pied Pipers, Glen Gray and Casa 
Loma Orchestra. 

CREDITS: Associate Producer, Will Cow- 
an; Director, Leslie Goodwins; Screenplay, 
Edward Dein; Suggested by story by 1 Dave 
Gould, Charles Marion; Cameraman, Jerry 
Ask; Musical Director, Charles Previn; Art 
Director, John Goodman; Film Editor, Arthur 
Hilton Dance Director, Josephine Earl. 

DIRECTION, All Right. PHOTOGRAPHY, 
Good. 



Reginald Barlow Dead 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Reginald Barlow, 76, 
veteran screen and stage actor, is 
dead. 



"Submarine Base" 

with John Litel, Fifi D'Orsay, Alan Baxter 

(HOLLYWOOD PREVIEW) 
PRC 65 Mins. 

WELL PRODUCED, DIRECTED AND 
ACTED MELODRAMA PACKS PLENTY r " 
SUSPENSE. (^ 

Here is a melodrama, well acted, pro- 
duced and directed. Jack Schwarz handled 
the production chores, with Harry D. Ed- 
wards as associate producer. Albert Kelley's 
direction maintains the suspense to the end, 
while Marcel LePicard's photography is 
splendid. 

Alan Baxter, a fugitive from the law, 
operates off an island on the Equator, off 
Brazil. His "business" is furnishing torpe- 
does to Nazi submarines. One day he fishes 
John Litel out of the ocean. Litel, a former 
New York detective, now a member of the 
Merchant Marine, recognizes Baxter as a 
gangster. 

Baxter holds Litel a prisoner on the island, 
and Litel soon becomes suspicious of Bax- 
ter's newly-found wealth. George Lee, an 
Englishman and long-time resident on the 
island, aids Litel. George Metaxa, a Ger- 
man agent, who pays Baxter for the tor- 
pedoes, begins to feel that Baxter is trying 
to "double-cross" him and the Germans, 
and has his suspicions fully confirmed when 
a Nazi submarine explodes off the island. 
Baxter had been supplying torpedoes, which 
were timed to explode a few hours after 
taking on a load. A gun battle follows, 
with Metaxa killing Baxter. 

Eric Blore and Luis Alberni furnish the 
comedy, while Fifi D'Orsay, Iris Adrian 
and Jacqueline Dalya are among the mem- 
bers of the cast. 

CAST: John Litel, Alan Baxter, Eric 
Blore, George Metaxa, George Lee, Rafael 
Storm, Fifi D'Orsay, Iris Adrian, Jacqueline 
Dalya, Anna Demetrio, Luis Alberni, Lucien 
Prival. 

CREDITS: Jack Schwarz; Associate Pro- 
ducer, Harry D. Edwards; Leon Fromkess in 
charge of production; Director, Albert Kel- 
ley; Authors, Arthur St. Clair and George 
Merrick; Cameraman, Marcel Le Picard; 
Musical Composer and Director, Charles 
Dant; Art Director, Frank Sylos; Editor, Hol- 
brook, H. Todd. 

DIRECTION, Splendid. PHOTOGRAPHY, 
Excellent. 



Warner Studio First Under 
Wire for New Tax Setup 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Warners was first of 
the major studios to register all em- 
ployes for new 20 per cent weekly 
income tax deductions, effective 
July 1. 

Result will be that all workers 
will get full legal deductions for 
dependents from outset of paycheck 
bump. Tabulating department, un- 
der E. L. De Patie, chief auditor, 
accomplished task by wiring Wash- 
ington for sample form the day Presi- 
dent Roosevelt signed the bill. Form 
was airmailed to studio the following 
day and on the third day the printer 
supplied enough official blanks to 
take care of entire personnel. 



JB&i 



■ 



Thursday, July 8, 1943 



DAILY 



Davis to Meet Film 
Reps, on OWI Future 



\i 



(Continued from Page 1) 

ture bureau will depend largely 
upon this conference. 

As yet the OWI does not know 
definitely how much of a job it can 
do on motion pictures, and it ap- 
pears that the procedure will be to 
put it up to the industry as to how 
much aid is needed. A proposed plan 
for the organization of the bureau, 
providing for only one separate of- 
fice in Washington, is already drawn 
up and Lowell Mellett, bureau chief, 
said yesterday he expects a decision 
on it within another week or so. 

Mellett refused to comment on reports 
that he was leaving: OWI. Other officials 
of the domestic branch were also unwilling' 
to comment on Mellett's status, although it 
is definitely known that his remaining 
with the agency is a red hot issue at the 
moment. Mellett is believed to wish to 
remain with the agency while there is re- 
portedly a strong movement on hand to 
move him out. His strong personal prestige 
overshadowing that of some of his superiors, 
is reported to be one of the reasons he has 
been asked to step out. 

The Hollywood work-liaison and script 
clearance, it appears now, will be handled 
by Ulric Bell, who represents the overseas 
branch of the motion picture bureau on 
the Coast. Bell, a former newspaper man 
like Poynter, works under Robert Riskin, 
head of the overseas pix bureau. He has 
been alone in Hollywood until now, using 
the office facilities of the domestic bureau, 
but it is probably now that he will have 
a staff of his own. Nelson Poynter, Mellett 
representative in Hollywood, is out, and it 
seems almost certain that the script clear- 
ance activities of OWI will be sharply cur- 
tailed. Bell will continue to advise on 
scripts destined for overseas showing, and 
may take over on his own responsibility 
for advice on other scripts — thus providing 
to a lesser extent the same service for which 
Poynter was responsible. Bell will probably 
get his own staff since he will no longer 
have the facilities of the Coast OWI office. 
Thus there may be in Hollywood something 
which some industry quarters have long felt 
would be desirable — a single OWI contact 
rather than separate contacts for the do- 
mestic and the overseas branch. That this 
may became officially the ease here in 
Washington and New York, too, is a possi- 
bility, although there is strong resistance 
within OWI to that plan. 

Here in Washington the only "must" jobs 
for OWI in moving pictures are the co-or- 
dination of Government films and the chan- 
nelling of Government agencies' requests to 
the industry. Because funds are plentiful 
for any of the Government agencies aside 
from the military, the former task should 
not prove too difficult. 



Artkino to Offer four 

Artkino Pictures will release five 
features comprising four dramas and 
a documntary during the first period 
of the 1943-44 season. Titles are 
"Black Sea Fighters," a documen- 
tary; "She Defends Her Country," 
"A Lad from Our Town," "Guer- 
rillas," and "It Started in Odessa." 



The ... . 

FEMME TOUCH 



THELMA WASHBURN, booker, RKO exchange, 
Des Moines. 

MRS. VERA DECKER, in charge of Schine The- 
aters candy sales in Western New York, 
Rochester. 

MARTHA SCOTT, assistant manager, Hub, 
Rochelle, III. 



Theater Minute Man Plan Clicks in Cincy: 

War Manpower Commission to Extend Setup 

Cleveland — Trial plan to recruit employes for war production plants via 
one-minute speakers at movie houses proved so successful that it will be extended 
throughout this area, Synth ia Ware, head of the publicity department of the WMC 
in this area declared, yesterday. With one-minute speakers recruited for indus- 
try making a single appeal from the stages of seven selected theaters and a 
United States Employment Service representative in the lobby to follow-up, 40 
employes, more than 50 per cent women, were recruited. The WMC is delighted 
with this new avenue approach to labor and will extend it materially, said Miss 
Ware, who was enthusiastic over the hearty co-operation rendered by G. W. 
Erdmann, secretary of the CMPEA and all of the participating theater managers. 



$50,000 Bond Required 
For Lease Suit Appeal 

Youngstown, O. — Bond of $50,000 
must be posted by any party or 
parties wanting to appeal the recent 
decision granting lease rights of 
the Palace Theater, beginning Aug. 
1, to the Dallmer Co., headed by At- 
torney Gerald F. Hammond, accord- 
ing to a recent ruling by Judge Ers- 
kine Maiden, Jr. 

The suit, heard here in April, was 
brought by the Dellmer Co. to de- 
termine whether it or the Public 
Square Theater Co., present holder 
of the lease, is entitled to the new 
lease. New York Life Insurance Co., 
as mortgagee-in-possession, planned 
to renew its lease with Public 
Square, while the Palace Realty Co., 
owner of the property, gave a ten- 
year lease to Dallmer. Judge Mai- 
den decided in favor of Dallmer. 

It was decided that posting of 
bond to cover any losses would be the 
best method of assuring operation 
of the theater during pendency of 
the suit. The $50,000 bond covers 
only damages which the Dallmer Co. 
if upheld in higher court, may suffer 
by being prevented from operating 
the theater during the expected 10- 
month litigation in higher courts. 



Franconi-Fidler Interests 
Take Mono. K.C. Franchise 



Dallas — Integration of the Mono- 
gram franchise office in Kansas City, 
with those in Dallas, Denver, and 
Salt Lake City, making a four-branch 
operation, said to be the most exten- 
sive in the Monogram system of 
franchises, is announced here by 
John L. Franconi. Franconi, and his 
co-partner Edwin Blumenthal, own- 
ers of the Dallas Monogram fran- 
chise, in association with Lon T. 
Fidler, Monogram franchise owner 
for Denver and Salt Lake City, have 
purchased the Kansas City fran- 
chise, possession being taken yes- 
terday. Leland Allen, former buyer 
for Commonwealth Theaters, Kansas 
City, has been appointed branch 
manager, and Ralph Heft office man- 
ager and city salesman. Fidler and 
Franconi will take turn-about for 
one week in each month for general 
supervision. 



Cincy V. C. Outing July 19 

Cincinnati — The Queen City Var- 
iety Club's annual family outing is 
set for July 19 at the Summit Hills 
Country Club, Dixie Highway. 



A. G. Allen Resigns as 
Chairman of ABC 



(Continued from Page 1) 

a possible deal for control of the 
circuit in which Warner Bros, are 
financially interested. 

There have been persistent re- 
ports during the last few months 
that A. J. Rank was angling for 
control through purchase of the 
dominant Maxwell estate interest. 

ABC has two joint managing di- 
rectors, Max Milder, representing 
Warners, and E. Lightfoot, acting 
for the British interests. 



Allen, who is an attorney, had 
been chairman of Associated Brit- 
ish Cinema since the Maxwell estate 
sold half of its interest in ABC 
about 18 months ago to Warner 
Bros. He had also been associated 
with the late John Maxwell, who in 
addition to his vast motion picture 
holdings, had also been an attorney 
himself. It is believed Allen held 
very little stock in ABC. 



Metro Minneapolis Branch 
Plaque Honors 5 in Service 



Minneapolis — Five employes of 
Metro's local branch now in the 
armed service, were honored when a 
plaque inscribed with their names, 
was dedicated at the office here iri the 
presence of relatives of the quintet. 

The plaque, of walnut topped by 
a silver spread eagle, contains the 
names of Lt. Oliver Lener, Pvt. Rob- 
ert Hazelton, Corp. Melvin Turner, 
Pvt. Ray Haberland and Pvt. William 
Donaldson. Lerner already is over- 
seas. 

W. H. Workman, branch manager 
unveiled the plaque. 



WLB Finally Approves 
SOPEG Contract With UA 



War Labor Board finally has ap- 
proved the SOPEG contract with 
United Artists covering home of- 
fice white collar workers. Pact, 
signed last January, provides for a 
raise increase of approximately 15 
per cent, retroactive to Nov. 21 last. 



BACK IN CIVVIES 

Honorably Discharged 



KENNETH THOMAS, from the Army, to Para- 
mount Theater, Hammond, Ind. 






BIG PICTURE 



p^SBS*' 




***** 





BARTON MacLANE 
HARRY SHANNON 
PAT BRADV 
ARLINE JUDGE 
and 

BOB NOLAN 

■nd 

THE SONS OF J0SEPH k» ne . Dlredor 

THE PIONEERS ^'^T^^SlZ^' 
Buy War'Bonds ! " ssoc,a,e Producer ' " ABRlf GREY 



It's a 

REPUBLIC PICTURE 



w 



DAILY 



Thursday, July 8, 1943 



20th-Fox Sets 15 
Pix; Minor A's Out 



{Continued from Page 1) 
have already figured in studio an- 
nouncements, will toe musicals and 
as many more will be in Technicolor, 
Schenck said. 

Roster of 15 is headed by "Wil- 
son," previously disclosed as Za- 
nuck's first personal production. 
Slated for the color vat are Harry 
Sherman's "Buffalo Bill," "Green- 
wich Village," musical starring 
Carmen Miranda, and the Betty 
Grable vehicle, "Where Do We Go 
From Here?" 

Other pix placed by Schenck on 
the production schedule yesterday 
included: "Happy Land," "Tam- 
pico," Edward G. Robinson starrer; 
"Lifeboat," to be directed by Alfred 
Hitchcock; "The Lodger," Mrs. Bel- 
loc Lowndes' murder mystery; "Am- 
bassador Dodd's Diary"; "Eve of St. 
Mark," which John Stahl will direct; 
"Torpedo Squadron 8," "Keys of the 
Kingdom," A. J. Cronin's best sel- 
ler acquired from David O. Selz- 
nick; "Four Jills and a Jeep," with 
Carol Landis, Martha Raye, Kay 
Francis and Mitzi Mayfair, and "Mo- 
ment of Music," Benny Goodman 
vehicle. 



Geneva Theater Closes; 
Driving Ban Is Blamed 



Rochester — Schine's Temple in 
nearby Geneva has been closed be- 
cause of the ban on pleasure driving. 
Schine's Geneva and Regent have 
remained open. 



WEDDING BELLS 



Fredericton, N. B. — Miriam Eliza- 
beth Eardley, of Fredericton, and 
William H. Metz, of St. John, N. B., 
were married here. The groom is in 
charge of advertising for the Spen- 
cer theaters. 



Indianapolis — Marilyn Brown, sec- 
retary in Universal booking depart- 
ment, and Maurice Bassett, Shelby- 
ville, Ind., have announced their 
wedding for July 28. 



Indianapolis — Ruth Gasper, War- 
ners billing department, and f.c. P. 0. 
Thomas A. Prewitt will be married 
Saturday in Piedmont, Cal. 



Cincinnati — Metro's Esther Shedd 
married Sergt. J. M. Polito, now sta- 
tioned in California. 



Las Vegas, Nev. — Betty Grable 
and Harry James were married Mon- 
day. 

New Haven — Lt. Frank Manente, 
former assistant at the Loew-Poli, 
was married here to Grayce Coca 
and leaves for Texas with his bride. 



HCLLyWCCD DIGEST 



SIGNED 

VICTOR SAVILLE, produce and direct "Heart of a 

City," Columbia. 
PETER LORRE, termer, Warners. 
DON DOUGLAS, termer, iRKO. 
PEGGY O'NEILL, termer, Charles R. Rogers. 
FIBBER McGEE & MOLLY, two pictures, RKO. 
KERMIT MAYNARD, termer, Republic. 



ASSIGNMENTS 

MAURICE SEIDERMAN, makeup director, "Since 

You Went Away," Vanguard. 
GEORGE SIDNEY, "Mr. Co-ed," M-C-M. 
CEORCE SIDNEY, director, "Mr. Co-ed," M-C-M. 
WILLIAM BEAUDINE, director, "The Thirteenth 

Guest," Monogram. 
FRED KANE, associate producer, "Dr. Paul 

Joseph Goebbels, His Life and Loves," W. 

R. Frank. 
LEE ZAHLER, score, "Tiger Fangs," Jack 

Schwarz-PRC. 
ALBERT J. COHEN, producer, "Atlantic City," 

Republic. 
CHARLES MARION and TIM RYAN, screen- 
play, "The Thirteenth Guest," Monogram. 
JACK CONWAY, director, "Dragon Seed," M- 

C-M. 

• 

CASTINGS 

PETER LORRE, "Passage to Marseille," War- 
ners; ELAINE RILEY, "An American Story," and 
"Higher and Higher," RKO; HENRY HULL, "Life- 
boat," 20th-Fox; ANN REVERE, "Standing Room 
Only," Paramount; PEGGY O'NEILL, "One Man's 
Family," Charles R. Rogers for UA; WILLIAM 
DAVIDSON, "Cover Girl," Columbia; KATHA- 
RINE HEPBURN, "Without love," M-G-M; 
RAYMOND WALBURN, "Hail the Conquering 
Hero," -Paramount; YVONNE de CARLO, "The 
Story of Dr. Wassell," Paramount. 

ROBERT WALKER, "Since You Went Away," 
David 0. Selznick; E. J. BALANTINE, VIN- 



CENT PRICE and ANTHONY QUINN, "Buf- 
falo Bill," 20th-Fox; BETTE DAVIS and PAUL 
HENREID, "Mr. Skeffington," Warners; ANNE 
GWYNNE and PECGY RYAN, "The Man of the 
Family," Universal; JACK HALEY, "Higher and 
Higher," RKO; LOU CROSBY, "Revenge," RKO; 
ELISHA COOK, JR., "Up in Arms," Samuel 
Goldwyn; LYNN MBRRICK, "Is Everybody 
Happy," Columbia; LESTER ALLEN, "Tropicana," 
Columbia; SUSAN HAYWARD "Jack London," 
Samuel Bronston-UA; MARY ASTOR, "Meet 
Me in St. Louis," M-G-M; VLADMIR SOKO- 
LOFF, "Passage to Marseille,' Warners; SHEL- 
LEY WINTER, "Nine Girls," Columbia; HARRY 
DAVENPORT, "Government Girl," RKO; WAL- 
LACE BEERY and MARJ0R1E MAIN, "Ration- 
ing," M-C-M; SMILEY BURNETTE, "Beyond the 
Last Frontier," Republic; DAN DURYEA, "Min- 
istry of Fear," Paramount; MARGO, "An Amer- 
ican Story," RKO; . 

• 

STORY PURCHASES 

LAMAR WARRICK'S "Yesterday's Children," 
M-G-M. 



SCHEDULED 

"There Goes Lena Henry," Ben Bogeaus for 
UA release. 

"Barnstorming," producer-director, LLOYD 
BACON; screenplay, MATT ALLEN. 

"They Also Wear Wings," producer, SAMUEL 
MARX; story, COM. HERMAN HALLAND; 
screenplay, JOHN TWIST, M-G-M. 

"Rationing," producer, O. 0. DULL; director, 
WILLIS COLDBECK. 

"The Harvey Girls," screenplay, ELINOR GRIF- 
FIN and WILLIAM RANKIN; music and 
lyrics, HARRY WARREN and JOHNNY 
MERCER, M-C-M. 

'Calling All Stars," producer, IRVING BRIS- 
KIN; screenplay, MONTE BRICE, Colum- 
bia. 



"There Goes Lena Henry" 
First by Bogeaus for UA 

{Continued from Page 1^ 

dent of General Service Studios, 
bought the novel from RKO for 
$25,000 and received a script by 
Kettizrings as part of the deal. 
Script is to be changed for added 
production values and the film is ex- 
pected to go before the cameras in 
late September. According to Bo- 
geaus, production cost will be around 
$950,000. 

Loretta Young has been named 
as probable star of the film. Bogeaus 
has launched negotiations with her, 
but consummation of the deal is in 
doubt, due to the star's prior com- 
mitments. 



Japs Holding Dugan, 
First Reported Missing 

Springfield, Ohio — Pvt. John E. 
Dugan, reported missing in action 
more than a year ago after the fall 
of Bataan and Corregidor, is a pris- 
oner of the Japanese in the Philip- 
pines. Pvt. Dugan was employed 
by Chakeres Theaters, Inc. before 
his enlistment. 



New 20th-Fox 100,000-Share 
Issue Sold in Few Hours 



{Continued from Page 1) 

night by Lehman Bros, and Hayden, 
Stone & Co., which head the under- 
writing group which is handling the 
issue. Subscription books were 
closed at noon. The stock, which is 
without par value and carries a 
$4.50 dividend, was offered a $100 
per share. 

The new stock issue was sanc- 
tioned by the 20th-Fox stockholders 
at a special meeting on Tuesday as 
a means of providing proceeds to 
enable the company to acquire the 
Chase National Bank's 58 per cent 
interest in National Theaters. 



Chicago — Chicago brokers report 
the sale of the new 100,000-share 
offering of Twentieth Century-Fox 
preferred stock issue in this market 
as satisfactory. Liberal newspaper 
advertising was used to sell the 
issue here. 



W. L. Peacock 111 

Pittsburgh — W. L. Peacock, vet- 
eran Harris Circuit theater man- 
ager, now stationed at the Beech- 
view Theater here, was taken very 
ill while on his vacation last week 
and will not be able to return to duty 
for at least several weeks, it is 
reported. 



Rohrs to Supervise Three 
More Exchanges for PRC 

PRO exchanges in Dallas, Okla- 
homa City and Little Rock have been 
added to the division supervised by 
Fred A. Rohrs, it was announced 
yesterday by Arthur Greenblatt, 
sales chief. 



Edwin R. Booth Dead 

Canton, O. — Edwin R. Booth, 55, 
for several seasons manager of the 
old Meyers Lake park theater here, 
died at his home of a heart ailment. 



10 Start on Coast, 
Making 47 Shooting 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Ten new pictures are 
scheduled to go into production this 
week, making 47 shooting. The 
check-up : 

At Columbia: Five shooting, in-/ 
eluding "Doughboys in Ireland," V 
musical, starring Kenny Baker, with 
Jeff Donnell, Lynn Merrick and the 
Jesters; and, "Cyclone Prairie 
Rangers," Charles Starrett western, 
with Jimmy Davis. Jack Fier pro- 
ducing both pictures. 

At M-G-M: Eleven shooting. 

Monogram: Three shooting-, including' "The 
Thirteenth Guest," drama, which Lindsley 
Parsons is producing and Bill Beaudine di- 
recting. 

At Paramount: Six shooting, including 
"The Story of Dr. Wassell," life story of 
War Hero Corydon M. Wassell, with Gary 
Cooper in the title role. Others in the cast 
are Laraine Day, Signe Hasso, Stanley 
Ridges, Benny McEvoy, Barbara Britton, 
Philip Ann, Henry Wilcoxon, Miles Mander, 
Elliott Reid and Melvin Francis. A Cecil 
B. De Mille production; "Standing Room 
Only," a gay comedy, co-starring Paulette 
Goddard and Fred MacMurray, with Roland 
Young in a major supporting role. Sidney 
Lanfield directing; "Hail the Conquering 
Hero," comedy starring Eddie Biacken, with 
William Demarest. Preston Si urges, direct- 
ing; and "Ministry of Fear," psychological 
mystery drama, with Ray Milland and Mar- 
jorie Reynolds in the leads, supported by 
Percy Waram, Byron Fougler and Erskine 
Sanford. Fritz Lang directing, with Seton 
I. Miller as associate producer. 

At PRC: One shooting 

At RKO-Radio: Five shooting, including 
"An American Story," drama scripted by 
Arch Oboler, with Margo in the feminine 
lead, supported by Wallj Bi own, Alan Car- 
nay, John Carradine, Ro'Ceit Ryan, Amalita 
Ward and James Ball. John Alter producing 
and directing. 

Samuel Goldwyn: Two shcoting. 

At Republic: Three shooting. 

At 20th Century-Fox: Five shooting, in- 
cluding "Buffalo Bill," westerr. in Techni- 
color, with Maureen O'Hara, Joel McCrea, 
Linda Darnell, Edgar Buchanan, Chief Many 
Treaties, Nick Thompson. Harry Sherman 
producing and William Weliman directing:. 

At United Artists: Samuel Bronson's "Jack 
London," based on the life of London, co- 
starring Michael O'Shea and Susan Hay- 
ward. Alfred Santell directing. 

At Universal: Six shooting. 

At Warners: Five shooting. 



tack Edwards Rites Held 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Rites were held here 
for Jack Edwards, 59, veteran trade 
newspaperman and formerly identi- 
fied with National Screen Service. 



STORKS 



Chicago — Oscar Brotman of Ava- 
loe and Rogers Theaters announces 
birth of daughter at Cuneo hospital. 
Newcomer has been named Barbara 
Jo. 



Indianapolis — Herbert Boss, Para- 
mount booker, is the father of a 5 
pound, 12 ounce, baby girl, born in 
the Coleman Hospital here. 

St. Louis — John (Bud) Wolf berg, 
USA, formerly of the Schine Cir- 
cuit, Lexington, Ky., is the father 
of a baby son born here. 



Thursday, July 8, 1943 



1KB 



DAILY 



Theater- Selling Order "Outrageous" — Schine 



Pleads Inability to Sell 
The Theaters; That Reten- 
tion is for the Public Good 



(Continued from Page 1) 

^filing of that suit, the Schine Cir- 
cuit, in a "final report" made in ac- 
cordance with the temporary Federal 
Court order of May 19, 1942, asks 
that the divestiture section be elimi- 
nated from the order and that the 
circuit be permitted to retain the 10 
theater interests it has not yet dis- 
posed of. 

The report was filed in Federal 
Court by Goodwin, Rosenbaum & 
Meacham of Washington and Ed- 
mund M. McCarthy of New York, 
counsel for the Schine defendants. 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Disposal of six of 
the 16 Schine Circuit theaters which 
the circuit was ordered to divest it- 
self of within one year from last 
May, as the result of action brought 
against the circuit and major dis- 
tributors by the Department of Jus- 
tice anti-trust division, was reported 
to the Department in a lengthy re- 
port filed this month by Schine at- 
torneys. 

The defendants have been unable 
to dispose of any of the other 10 
thus far, "although they have at- 
tempted to do so with the greatest 
diligence," said the report. They 
ask that they not be required to 
dispose of the rest, thereby calling 
for a clear statement of future 
plans from the Government. 

Of the 16 theaters reported to have 
been acquired by the circuit since 
the case was first brought, in Aug- 
ust 1939, the following six have 
been transferred: The Paramount, 
Glens Falls, N. Y.; the Webster, 
Rochester, N. Y.; the Clazel and the 
Lyric, Bowling Green, 0.; the Pal- 
act, Clifton Springs, N. Y.; and Sco- 
tia, Scotia, N. Y. 

Tip-off of Government Plans 

The Government decision on this 
request should be a sure tip-off on 
its plans for November proceedings 
in the New York equity suit. The 
report pointed out that between the 
filing of the original New York 
equity suit against the majors, their 
satellites, UA, Columbia and Uni- 
versal at the time of the consent 
decree in that case, Paramount has 
been permitted to increase its the- 



WHO'S WHO IN HOLLYWOOD 

• • • Presenting Interesting Personalities • • • 
JOHN HUBBARD. Actor. Native of East Chicago, Indiana. Started enter- 
•* tainment career with Goodman Theater Repertoire Co. of Chicago in 1933. 
Preferred such to offer of his father to follow in his foot- 
steps, and finally become an executive with the Inland 
Steel Company. After four years of 52 weeks each 
playing "stock" in Chicago, mid-West and South with 
this same company, he was discovered by famed 
talent scout from filmland, Oliver Hinsdale, and brought 
to Hollywood and Paramount. Since 1937 screen 
start, Hubbard has been (except for five months) under 
long-term contract at Paramount, M-G-M, Hal Roach 
and Columbia; at last named studio now. Roles he liked 
best were all light comedy leads: "Housekeeper's 
Daughter," "Turnabout," "Dramatic School," "Our Wife," 
and "Youth on Parade." Does radio guest shots often. 
Plays golf, tends his family. Wife, Lois, school days' 
sweetheart, and 2-year-old daughter, Maryan. Stands, 
6 ft. Hair, Light brown. Weighs, 170 pounds. Eyes, 
blue-gray. 




Nunn, Missing, Found 
On South Sea Isle 

Cleveland — Robert Nunn, Hippo- 
drome usher, reported lost at sea, 
was found on a South Sea Island and 
was taken aboard an American war 
ship, his parents have just been in- 
formed. 



ater holdings from 1,093 to 1,210, 
including 23 first-run houses in ma- 
jor cities. Loew's added four to its 
20 first-run houses, Twentieth Cen- 
tury-Fox added 11 to its 19 first- 
run Metropolitan houses and nine 
to its 499 other theaters, Warners 
added 15 first-run Metropolitan 
houses to its 20 and 15 other the- 
aters to its 507, and RKO increased 
its' number of Metropolitan first-run 
theaters from 19 to 29. 

The consent decree itself provided that 
the defendants could retain all their the- 
ater holding's acquired prior or subsequent 
to the filing' of the original complaint and 
added that "nothing herein shall prevent 
any such defendant from acquiring theaters 
or theater interests to protect its investment 
or its competitive portion, or for ordinary 
purposes of its business." 

Hold 4 Defendants Compete 

Pour of the five consenting- Paramount 
defendants' in the New York suit, the brief 
points out, "compete, as exhibitors, with 
the defendants on whose behalf this report 
is made." In the light of these circum- 
stances, the report declares that "it was ah 
outrageous act of oppression for the Gov- 
ernment to require these defendants, having 
only 150 theater interests, to attempt to 
sell the 15 theater inerests which they had 
acquired since the filing of the complaint 
against them, while it permitted the pro- 
ducer-distributor-exhibitor defendants who 
were also defendants in this case to retain 
the 63 metropolitan first-run theaters and 
141 other theaters acquired after the filing 
of the complaint." 

Supporting- its contention that the court 
has the discretion to release the circuit from 
the necessity to dispose of the rest of these 
theaters and to acquire no more theaters, 
the Schine circuit includes in its report a 
lengthy excerpt from the statement made by 
its counsel in presenting- the consent decree 
to the court. 

Holding that original causes of the com- 
plaint — that Schine was uniformly given 
first choice on first-run pictures, the dis- 
tributors refused to license films on a nor- 
mal competitive basis, and that Schine was 
given numerous other advantages — have been 
restrained by court order, the report de- 
clares that "these complaints are relied upon 
by the plaintiff as grounds justifying it in 
permitting the Paramount exhibitor defen- 
dants to retain the theaters held and to 
acquire more and they are equally applicable 
to the defendants here — it is apparent as a 
matter of common sense that the acquisition 
of additional theaters by these defendants 
and the retention of those that they have, 
implement rather than restrain competition 
and is in the public interest. 

Unwilling to Re-acquire Theaters 

'Enough has been disclosed to show to 
the court that the reason why the former 
owners of the interests in question were 



willing to sell and why they are unwilling 
to re-acquire the theaters is because they 
could not operate them profitably and nec- 
essarily the proper operation of these the- 
aters is to the advantage of the public. It 
should also be apparent on the face of the 
record that the public greatly profits by 
the acquisition of inadequately equipped 
theaters and their proper equipment and 
rehabilitation by those who are able through 
experience and the possession of the neces- 
sary means so to do, and this has been a 
factor in giving to small communities amuse- 
ment facilities comparable to those enjoyed 
by those which are larger." 

Schine pointed out in discussing the in- 
dividual theaters disposed of under the 
terms of the order that the Paramount, in 
Glens Falls, N. Y., was re-acquired by Para- 
mount Pictures, Inc., adding that "it should 
be noted that the former owner to whom 
the temporary order required preference 
should be given was a producer-distributor- 
exhibitor operating at the time (June 31, 
1942) 1,210 theaters, 107 of which had 
been acquired since the filing of the suit 
against it." Scoring the court's provision 
that preference on acquisition of these the- 
aters should go to their former owners, the 
complaint pointed out also that the Clazel 
anl Lyric Theaters were turned back to their 
former owners, Clark and Hazel Young, and 
then released at a substantial profit to Carl 
H. Schwyn of Cygnet, Ohio. "The attention 
of the court is further directed to the fact 
that the Department of Justice had prev- 
iously advised John Stump, the former owner 
of the Strand Theater, Cumberland, Md., in 
response to an inquiry by him, that the 
privilege of re-acquisition was a personal one 
and non-transferrable." 

The Schine circuit again declared its posi- 
tion that inclusion of the Liberty Theater, 
Pikeville, Ky., among those which were 
ordered disposed of was an error, on the 
grounds that the theater was acquired prior 
to the filing of the suit against the circuit 
in August, 1939. Atempts were made, how- 
ever, to dispose of the theater. In the cases 
of the other theaters included in the order, 
the original owners were not interested In 
re-acquiring the'm, and options on all of 
them, given to Sol Shafer of Rochester, N. 
Y., were not exercised. 

Evidence of Good Will 

The company offered as evidence of its 
good faith constant reports in the trade 
press on what theaters remained unsold. 
Brokers, however, refuse to take an interest 
in arranging deals for these theaters be- 
cause the order stipulated that no commis- 
sion was payable. The defendant went to 
considerable expense, said the report, to 
try to dispose of the properties. 

"The operation of motion picture the- 
aters," said the report, "is a highly competi- 
tive and unusually individual type of busi- 
ness which requires the constant, continuous 
and alert attention and services of every 
member of an organization to enable it to 
function efficiently and properly, not only 
in the best public interest but for the pro- 
tection of the property rights involved; the 



WAR SERVICE 

. . . on the Film Front 



Eddie Cantor to Address 
NEIC Dinner Meeting 

Eddie Cantor will be the guest of 
honor at the Astor Hotel tonight at 
the final dinner meeting of the con- 
tinuations committee of the Na- 
tional Entertainment Industry Coun- 
cil before the first session of the 
NEIC next week. The comedian will 
speak on entertainment and its re- 
lation to morale. The agenda for 
the second day of the NEIC confer- 
ence will be discussed at the meeting. 



continuous disruption of the regular, neces- 
sary and normal course of the operation of 
the business of this company by its ex- 
ecutive, officers and employes by the con- 
stant, continuous repetitious endeavors to 
find purchasers or to negotiate and prop- 
erly handle inquiries for possible purchasers 
and from possible purchasers has seriously 
interfered with and disrupted the efficient op- 
eration of these defendants' business and 
adversely affected their standing in the in- 
dustry." 

It was pointed out also that the theaters 
are not kept in good repair, since incentive 
for further investment is lacking, and that 
they are therefore becoming less and less 
attractive as investment possibilities for 
others. Responsibility for deteriorating of 
these theaters is implicitly charged to the 
court order requiring their disposal. 

Besides the Liberty, in Pikeville, Ky., 
other theaters still undisposed of include the 
Marjorie Grand. Harlan, Ky.; the Strand, 
Cumberland, Md.; the Plaza, Malone, N. Y.; 
the Memorial, Mt. Vernon, Ohio; the Opera 
House, Lexington, Ky.; the Ada Meade, Lex- 
ington; the Viv, Corbin, Ky.; and the State 
and the Appalachian. Appalachian, Va. 

A decision from the Department of Jus- 
tice is to be looked for within another 
month or so, probably, although Robert L. 
Wright, in charge of motion picture consent 
decree matters for the division, refused to 
predict just when the decision will be made. 
He would not discuss the probable answer 
of the division, refusing- to comment when 
this reporter predicted that, it would not be 
in the affirmative. 



Snorting Instinct 

Moosup, Conn. — Mrs. Miriam Hess 
has used the element of surprise to 
build up a strong, regular Tuesday 
patronage over the past five years 
at the Moosup Theater. No ad- 
vance publicity on the dual to be 
shown is offered the public, and 
even at the box office that night, 
no information is given. It's "Take 
a Chance" night, and they do! 



Athens, 0. — Deck of playing cards or ' 
10 copies of popular magazines published 
this year served as admission at a film 
show at the Athena Theater, sponsored by 
the Kiwanis Club. The cards and maga- 
zines will be given to service men on troop 
trains. 

. . . — V . . .— 

Cedar Rapids, la. — Theater usherettes 
here are going all-out in the war effort. 
The gals are contributing their day off each 
week to farmers in and around Cedar Rapids 
who need farm help. 



10 



DAILY 



Thursday, July 8, 1943 



Divorcement Bill Gets Quick Exhibitor Reaction 



"Just as Wrong as Ever," 
Kuykendall; Myers Favors 
Senate Hearings in Fall 



(Continued from Page 1) 

where, though abused by trade prac- 
tices, oppose it." 

Abram F. Myers, Allied's general 
counsel and board chairman, in re- 
sponse to a similar invitation to ex- 
press Allied's viewpoint, advised 
from Washington that Allied's board, 
meeting in Baltimore next month, 
would determine the support to be 
given the Kilgore measure. 

Myers added the personal belief 
that hearings by a Senatorial com- 
mittee next Fall, coincidental with 
the end of the New York consent 
decree's trial period, "would be most 
helpful." 

Full texts of the two exhibitor 
leaders' statements follow: 
KUYKENDALL: 

"The Neely bill is just as wrong 
as ever. It is unworkable and does 
not make sense in this industry. 
Any inspiration for it must come 
from misguided individuals. _ We 
cannot operate under its provisions. 
Sane-thinking exhibitors, every- 
where, though abused by trade prac- 
tices, oppose it. Let's keep our 
balance, now of all times. I can- 
not believe the Department of Jus- 
tice approves this bill, written in 
malice and spite." 

MYERS: 

"Support to be accorded the Kil- 
gore bill will be considered by Al- 
lied Board Aug. 11 and 12. Immed- 
iate action is not called for as Con- 
gress shortly will recess for six 
weeks. Theater divorcement is a 
standing policy of Allied and was 
reaffirmed in a resolution on May 6 
last. The board then informed the 
Attorney General divorcement con- 
stituted the only adequate remedy. 
I personally feel hearings on the 
bill next Fall, coinciding with ex- 
piration of test period of consent 
decree, would be most helpful. Such 
hearing would develop defects of 
consent decree and reveal the mys- 
tery surrounding its negotiation and 
entry." 

PCC Reps. Have no Comment 
Supporting Divorcement Bill 

West Coast Bureau of THE 'FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — In absence of Execu- 
tive Secretary Robert H. Poole, who 
is out of the city on his vacation, 
representatives of PCC of ITO de- 
clined to comment as to whether 
their organization would press for 
enactment of the theater divorce- 
ment bill, or support it. 



Wotta Man Adam! 

Chicago — Caught on the marquee 
of Warners' Cosmo Theater here: 
"Adam Had Four Sons" 
"Seven Sweethearts" 



TO THE COLORS! 



* DECORATED * 

CORP. SHELDON A. WALSH, USA, formerly, 
Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, awarded the 
Purple Heart. 

Photographer's Mate, 1. F. FLYNN, USN, form- 
erly with Technicolor, awarded the Air 
Medal for gallantry in action in the South 
Pacific area. 

LT. ROSS L. BLACHLY, USA, formerly with 
Eastman Kodak. Hollywood, decorated for 
meritorious action in the Southwest Pacific. 

— • — 

PROMOTED 

VAUGHN PAUL, USN, formerly Universal art 
director, Hollywood, to lieutenant (j.g.). 

CHARLES COOPER, USAAF, formerly general 
manager, Jack Kirsch Theaters, Chicago, to 
sergeant. 

— • — 

* ARMY * 

ERNEST RICHTER, technical advisor, Universal, 

Hollywood. 
BEN LOVELESS, transcription dept., Republic, 

Hollywood. 
JAMES THOMPSON, Apollo Theater, Chicago. 
EDDIE SEGUIN, publicity dept., B & K, Chicago. 
HERBERT L. JOSEPHS, son of the owner of the 

Triangle, Pittsburgh. 
JOHN JAFFURS, JR., manager, Star, Glassport, 

Pa. 



JOSEPH GOLDSTEIN, son of Nathan E. Gold- 
stein, president of Western Massachusetts 
Theaters, Springfield. Mass. 

MICKEY NUNES, son of Morris Nunes, head of 
Progressive Premiums, New Haven. 

WILLIAM DUCKWORTH, operator, Licking The- 
ater, Licking, Mo. 

LOUIS COLLINS, manager, Canton Theater, Can- 
ton, Mo. 

HARRY THOMS, manager, Clencoe Theater, Clen- 
coe, III. 

R. D. STALLINGS, manager, Imperial, Charlotte. 

— • — 

* NAVY * 

WILLIAM BROWN, shipper, 20th-Fox, Cincin- 
nati. 
WILLIAM WANG, Metro home office publicist. 

— • — 

* MARINE CORPS * 

ERNEST KORNCOLD, son of Erich Wolfgang 
Korngold, Warner music composer, Holly- 
wood. 

— • — 

* ARMY AIR FORCE * 

CY JACOBSON, film buyer, Indiana-Illinois 
Theater Circuit, Chicago. 

* TO OFFICERS SCHOOL * 

RICHARD LEWIS, motion picture editor, Times, 
Indianapolis. 



Superb Delivery Record 
Is Hung Up by RKO Radio 

What appears as a unique record 
in modern film annals is about to be 
attained by RKO Radio in the mat- 
ter of delivering an announced sea- 
son's lineup virtually 100 per cent. 
Speaking to 300 delegates to the 
company's annual sales meeting in 
New York a year ago, Ned E. Depi- 
net, organization president, prom- 
ised 45 features and 185 snorts on 
the 1942-43 program. Only one, — 
"Grand Canyon," — will not be de- 
livered, and for the reason that its 
making would not be consistent with 
the policy of doing everything pos- 
sible to aid in the war's winning. 

The picture, it is declared by the 
company, was forced off the sched- 
ule of attractions because transpor- 
tation problems, gas rationing and 
the need for tire conservation made 
it impractical to film the picture on 
the distant Grand Canyon location. 



Bob Wile Joins Universal 

Robert Wile, recently editor of the 
Motion Picture Herald Round Table, 
has joined Universal as assistant to 
A. J. Sharick, manager of the Sales 
Promotion Department. Wile will 
devote most of his time to the de- 
velopment of sales promotional ideas 
and literature. 



Estabrook Adapting "Hairy Ape" 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Jules Levey has 
signed Howard Estabrook who sce- 
narized "The Human Comedy," to 
adapt and write the screenplay of 
his "The Hairy Ape," which will be 
based on hit play by Eugene O'Neill. 



WB Midwestern District 
Head to be Named Today 



(Continued from Page 1) 

sales manager, presiding. Embrac- 
ing 14 exchange territories, the 
Chicago assemblage will number at 
least 110 and will be the largest of 
the three gatherings. 

Branch sales personnel attending 
here includes the Midwest District, 
for which a new district manager is 
expected to be announced by Kal- 
menson at today's session; the 
Southern District, headed by Ralph 
L. McCoy, and the Prairie District, 
headed by Hall Walsh. 

Home office delegation on hand in- 
cludes, in addition to Kalmenson, 
Joseph Bernhard, Arthur Sachson, 
Roy Haines, A. W. Schwalberg, 
Jules Lapidus, Norman H. Moray, 
Howard Levinson, Ed Hinchy, I. F. 
Dolid, Albert S. Howson. 

Charles Einfeld, director of ad- 
vertising and publicity, is due to 
arrive today or tomorrow to address 
the meeting before proceeding to 
New York for conferences on the 
launching of Irving Berlin's "This 
is the Army." 

Mort Blumenstock, in charge of 
advertising and publicity in the 
East, who was to have participated 
in the Chicago sales meeting, was 
detained in New York by the pres- 
sure of work on "This is the Army" 
and is expected to arrive here to- 
morrow. 



Stores Closed, Biz Declines 

Rochester, N. Y. — Saturday clos- 
ing policy, adopted for the Summer 
by local retail stores, is cutting Sat- 
urday matinee biz. 



i S I CI 



IN NEW POSTS 



SOL FRANCIS, special home office rep., Mono 
gram, Midwestern territory. 

WALTER DONAHUE, assistant office manager 
Columbia, Philadelphia exchange. 

BOB WILE, sales promotion dept., Universal 
home office. 

MAXINE SMITH, publicity director, J. Walter 
Thompson, Hollywood. 

RALPH LAWLER, Central Illinois district man- 
ager, Publix Great States Theaters, St. 
Louis. 

GLENN SHIPP, manager, Darb, Manteno, III. 

ROBERT ANDERSON, supervisor, Anderson The- 
ater Circuit, Morris, III. 

MILLARD McKIRGAN, manager, Grand, Piano, 
111. 

EARL HOLDEN, manager, Imperial, Charlotte. 



( 



See Mexico Training 
Field for Pix Execs. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Universal — and it is understood that 
other distributors also have plans. 

Tip-off came when it was an- 
nounced that Richard Spierman and 
Mike Shatin, assigned here by War- 
ners some time ago, are slated for 
foreign distribution executive posts 
under Robert Schless. Spierman, at 
one time in India for RKO, will take 
over for Warners in South Africa, 
it is said, while Shatin, also ' not 
without foreign experience already — 
he was in Tokyo for some time — is 
said scheduled for an assignment to 
India. 



Columbia Hands Out Two 
Directorial Assignments 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Columbia has signed 
Victor Saville to produce and direct 
"Heart of a City." Picture, which 
will be in Technicolor, will be a Rita 
Hayworth starring vehicle. 

With the signing of a new produc- 
ing contract at Columbia, Lou Edel- 
man was also handed the assign- 
ment of producing a new Paul Muni 
starring vehicle, tentatively titled 
"At Night We Dream," which goes 
into preparation immediately. 



Night Club, Laching 
Talent, Shows Films 

Youngstown, O. — Paul Alvino, 
operator of the Rendezvous Villa, 
night club, has changed its name 
to the Theater Club and is offering 
movies three nights a week, and floor 
show entertainment and orchestra 
the other four nights. Using films 
solves the shortage of entertainers, 
according to Alvino. 



3 A N 

IS V V M!!Z 

•1J I Z 

CH ) cl cl tl ^ 



M i 5 I 3 I) A 
2 f> W 4ATH 
NYC 



Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 




FILE COPY 

&O NOT REMOVE 



The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



X75fi 84, NO. 6 



NEW YORK, FRIDAY, JULY 9, 1943 



TEN CENTS 



MELLETTS OWI RESIGNATION REPORTED IN 

NTS "Magic Bridge" Speeds Post- War Equip. 



Editorial 



Scratch-pad 

. . . jottings 

-= By CHESTER B. BAHN === 



THE more you have an opportunity to size 
' up what other industries are doing to 
cope with war-time problems, the more 
you are impressed with what film biz is 
accomplishing in that respect. ... In some 
cases, there's really no comparison. . . . 
Take, f'r instance, the railroads. . . . And 
what follows is based on personal experi- 
ence. ... In display copy in the daily press 
o' late, the lines have been stressing their 
war-time difficulties and how they're largely 
being solved. . . . That is, all but the lack 
of extra rolling stock to handle the increased 
traffic. . . . But there is emphasis in the 
copy on how the men in uniform are get- 
ting first call on accommodations, which is, 
of course, as it should be. . . . And no kicks 
from this 1943 civilian, who happens to 
have a couple of proxies in uniform this 
time. 



BUT are the boys in unform getting that 
heralded "break" from the railroads? 
. . . Well, your columnar reporter traveled 
the other week-end on a Pittsburgh to New 
York train on an "A" railroad. . . . The 
dozen-odd coaches were filled 90 per cent 
with men in uniform. . . . Sure, some of the 
coaches were de luxe and supposedly air 
conditioned. ... But the cooling equipment 
was out of order. . . . And the train crew 
was unconcerned. . . . The sanitary state 
of the coaches, some extremely ancient, 
ranged from dirty to just plain filthy. . . . 
A continuous stream of cinders sifted in 
the window frames. . . . Lavatories in some 
coaches were merely holes in the floor, with 
no flush facilities. . . . And there were no 
wash basins. 



DEFORE the train had completed half the 
" run to New York, many of the coaches 
were without drinking water and others 
without paper cups. . . . And by the time 
Harrisburg had been reached, service men 
were moving vainly through the train in 
search of a drink of water. . . . Sure, there 
were several intervening stops. . . . But 
there was no effort made to fill the water 
tanks or to replenish the supply of cups. . . . 
So, cramped in dirty seats, or sprawled 
grotesquely across them and their barracks 
bags in search of sleep, the service men — 
some of them bearing shoulder bars — 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Plan Embraces Special 
Survey Covering Require- 
ments of Individual Houses 



Film houses throughout the nation 
are potential beneficiaries of a new 
plan just instituted and announced 
by National 
Theatre Sup- 

f National- 
ist National- 
Simplex- 
Bl oodworth, 
Inc., whereby 
not only will 
delivery of all 
post-war the- 
ater equipment 
be accelerated 
but made 
available to 
exhibition out- 

1 e t s without 
advance "o p - 
tions" or down 
payments. 

Christened the "Magic Bridge" 

(Continued on Page 6) 




WALTER E. GREEN 



Coe Pays Eloquent 
Tribute to Industry 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Characterizing Holly- 
wood as the best known and most 
beloved "home town" on earth, 
Chai'les Francis "Socker" Coe, at a 
banquet of the Hollywood Chamber 
of Commerce honoring the motion 
picture industry said: "From this 

(Continued on Page 4) 



NEIC SPEAKERS 

Tibbett, Maj. Gen. Osborne to 
Address Conference 



At its meeting at the Hotel Astor 
last night the continuations commit- 
tee of the National Entertainment 
Industry Council, announcement was 
made that several speakers have 
been added to the roster of those 
who will deliver addresses at the 
first day's meeting of the Council, 
next Wednesday. Lawrence Tibbett, 
Maj. Gen. Frank Osborn and Win- 
throp Aldrich were those added to 
the list. Elmer Davis, OWI chief, 
and Ted Gamble of the Treasury De- 

(Continued on Page 4) 



, Army in 
Aleutians" Dispute 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — It looks as if Lowell 
Mellett will leave behind him when 
he retires next week from his posi- 
tion as head of the OWI motion pic- 
ture bureau one final disagreement 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Official Announcement of 
His Quitting Expected to 
Be Made in Capital Today 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — OWI will an- 
nounce today the resignation 
of Lowell Mellett, motion pic- 
ture chief, effec- 
tive on or about 
July 15. It was 
admitted by re- 
liable sources 
last night that 
Mellett has re- 
signed, although 
no official confir- 
mation was forth- 
coming. Mellett, 
former head of 
the Office of Gov- 
ernment Reports, 
had been chief of 
the domestic mo- 
tion picture bu- 
reau since OWI 
was formed over 
a year ago. Despite several misun- 

(Continued on Page 5) 




LOWELL MELLETT 



Goldwyn, Mulvey to Host 
RKO Convention Delegates 



Delegates to RKO Radio's twelfth 
annual sales meeting which starts a 
three-day session on Monday, at the 
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, will be 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Manpower Shortage Growing 

Graver Problem Likely, WB Sales Meet Told 



Kalmenson Sends Seed 
To Fill Midwestern Gap 



Chicago — Harry Seed, New York 
Metropolitan District Manager, for 
Warners, has been assigned to the 
Midwest district, comprising Detroit, 
Chicago, Milwaukee and Minneap- 
olis, in an acting capacity for an 
indefinite period, it was announced 
(Continued on Page 5) 



Chicago — Warning that the grow- 
ing shortage of manpower may 
eventually confront the industry with 
a problem far more serious than that 
heretofore faced was sounded at 
Warners' regional sales meeting at 
the Blackstone Hotel here yesterday 
by both Joseph Bernhard, vice-presi- 
dent of the company, and Ben Kal- 
menson, sales chief. 

Both speakers, who addressed the 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Offer Morrison Co. 
Top Spot to Walker 



James J. Walker, former Mayor 
of New York and veteran film indus- 
try leader, commenting last night in 
an interview with The Film Daily, 
confirmed the Hollywood report that 
he had been offered the presidency 
of the new Morrison film company 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Owl Shows Clich 

In Mich. Drive-ins 

Detroit — Saturday Midnight shows 
for war workers in the city's two 
Drive-In Theaters have proved suc- 
cessful. Drive-ins are located at the 
eytreme outskirts, and are con- 
veniently accessible by highways 
from all parts of town. Attendance 
has been averaging around 50 cars to 
these late shows, with a night's 
total of perhaps 400 in each theater. 



Tfflt 



DAILY 



Friday, July 9, 1943 




Vol. 84, No. 6 Fri., July 9, 1943 lOCents 



JOHN W. ALICOATE : : : : Publisher 



DONALD M. MERSEREAU : General Manager 



CHESTER B. BAHN :::::: Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address- 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco-Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



FINANCIAL 



(Thursday, July 8) 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 

161/ 2 163/ 8 161/ 2 + 1/ 8 

18 17% 17% + i/ 2 



Am. Seat 

Col. Picts. vtc. (2V2%) 
Columbia Picts. pfd.. 

Con. Fm. Ind 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd.. 

East. Kodak 1 

do pfd 1 

Gen. Prec. Eq 

toew's, Inc 

Paramount 

RKO 

■RKO $6 pfd 

20th Century-Fox 
20th Century-Fox pfd. 

Univ. Pict. pfd 

Warner Bros 

do pfd 

NEW YORK 
Para. B'way 3s55. . . 
iPara. Picts. deb. 4s56 

NEW YORK 

Monogram Picts 

Radio-Keith cvs 

Sonotone Corp 

Technicolor 

Trans-Lux 

Universal Picts 



3 

171/2 
66 
80 
22 

6II/2 
291/4 
9% 
943/4 
21% 
327/ 8 



3 3 

17 17 

651/2 166 

80 180 

22 22 

61% 61 1/4 + 



+ Vs 

— Vi 

+ 1 

+ '/4 



% 



28V2 29 + % 



9 91/4 + 

941/2 943/4 + 
2H/4 21% + 



32% 325/ 8 + Vs 



'153/4 

891/2 

BOND 

771/2 

CURB 

33/4 

13/4 
3% 

13% 



14% 15 
893/ 8 893/ 8 
MARKET 
77% 771/2 



MARKET 

3% 33/4 + 1/4 

l 3 /4 13/4 

3% 3% + 1/s 

123/4 13 



19% 19i/ 8 19% + 



Lehman Corp. Adds 15,000 
Shares of 20th-Fox Com. 



Addition of 15,000 shares of 20th- 
Fox common to the Lehman Corp. 
stock portfolio in the June quarter is 
revealed in the investment house's 
financial statement for the fiscal 
year ended June 30. 



Gambles Opening New House 

Portland, Ore. — The new 750-seat 
Vanport Theater is scheduled for 
opening on July 15. Theater will be 
operated by the Ted R. Gamble in- 
terests, and will be under the per- 
sonal supervision of Willard Gamble. 



Scratch-pad 

. . . jottings 

(Continued from Page 1) 

endured a night that was 100 per cent 
nightmare. 



A DMITTEDLY, the war has made severe 
** and unusual demands on the railroads. 
. . . But so has it upon the nation's thea- 
ters. . . . Yet contrast the physical condi- 
tion of the theaters with that of the rail- 
road coaches (at least on this particular 
railroad, which, incidentally, is one of those 
advertising in the dailies). . . . And com- 
pare, further, this industry's attention to the 
welfare of the armed forces with that 
described and you'll be just a bit prouder 
of film biz. 



Clearance Reduction 
Ordered in Ohio Case 



Arbitrator Robert H. Sanborn has 
ordered reduction of the clearance 
granted Warners' Ohio and Sigma 
Theaters, Lima, O., to three days 
over the Capitol, Delphos, O., in an 
arbitration hearing before the Cleve- 
land tribunal. Sanborn further stip- 
ulated that the Capitol may play 
pictures released by RKO, Loew's 
and Paramount not later than 21 
days after Cleveland release date. 

Award came from an action 
brought by E. L. Staub, owner of 
the Capitol against Vitagraph, RKO, 
Loew's and Paramount which pro- 
tested the 14 days' clearance granted 
to Lima houses. Action against Vi- 
tagraph was dismissed and the costs 
divided between the complainant and 
the defendants. 



16 mm. Pix for RCAF Camps 
New Dom. Exhib. Headache 



Ottawa — Increased competition is 
seen for theaters in the announce- 
ment 16 mm. films will be available 
at upwards of a hundred camps of 
RCAF simultaneously with the re- 
lease of the same product to first- 
run commercial theaters in a new 
arrangement for distribution of nar- 
row prints throughout the Air Force 
by Government-recognized auxiliary 
services. 

Complaint had been that airmen 
had to wait several months after 
theater premieres before 16 mm. fea- 
tures were shown in camp theaters. 

RCAF has organized a distribu- 
tion system of its own similar to 
that of film exchanges to expedite 
bookings. 



"U" Signs Tex Ritter 
For Seven Western Pix 



West Coast Bureau of THE' FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Universal has signed 
Tex Ritter to star in seven west- 
erns for the 1943-44 season. They 
will be made by associate producer 
Oliver Drake, who made seven for 
last year's release, in which Ritter 
was co-starred with Johnny Mack 
Brown. Fuzzy Knight will again 
head the featured supporting cast. 



Congress Votes to 
Adjourn Tomorrow 

Washington Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — The House late yes- 
terday joined the Senate in approving 
a recommendation that Congress be 
adjourned until Sept. 14, unless sum- 
moned for a special session before 
then. 



$1,000,000 Slander Suit 
Against 306 Dismissed 



Supreme Court Justice Morris 
Eder yesterday dismissed the $1,- 
000,000 slander action brought by 
the Scoop 14th St. Theater Corp., 
owners of the City Theater, against 
Local 306, operators. The court 
granted the corporation leave to file 
an amended complaint in a damage 
action against the union, also nam- 
ing as a defendant Herman Gelber, 
head of Local 306. The damage ac- 
tion seeks $2,200 a day for 22 days 
of an alleged unlawful strike called 
by the union on April 30. 

The court dismissed the slander 
action on the grounds that the cor- 
poration did not state sufficient facts 
to constitute a cause of action. The 
plaintiffs had charged that a Local 
306 picket had called the owners of 
the house "tools of Laval." 



Five "U" Features to Get 
Relay-Runs in Criterion 



Several of Universal's top pro- 
ductions will occupy the Criterion's 
screen during the next few months, 
it was announced yesterday by that 
company. "Hers To Hold," with 
Deanna Durbin and Joseph Cotten 
in the top roles, follows the current 
"Bombardier" into the house. Sub- 
sequently, the Abbott and Costello 
comedy, "Hit the Ice," is ticketed for 
the stand. 

Other "U" attraction in the chain 
of bookings are Howard Hawks' 
"Corvette K-225," starring Randolph 
Scott; Walter Wanger's "We've Nev- 
er Been Licked," with Noah Beery, 
Jr., Richard Quine, Anne Gwynne, 
and Martha O'Driscoll; and the Tech- 
nicolor opus, "Cobra Woman," star- 
ring Maria Montez, Jon Hall and 
Sabu. 



COminG and G0IF1G 



"man- 



Warners Will Re-Issue 
Two James Cagney Films 



"The Oklahoma Kid," starring 
James Cagney and Humphrey Bogart 
and "Torrid Zone," starring Cagney 
and Ann Sheridan, are scheduled for 
re-issue by Warners to augment next 
season's lineup. 

"Oklahoma Kid" is tentatively 
down as a September release with 
"Torrid Zone" expected to follow a 
few months later. Current high pop- 
ularity of the stars plus fact that 
Warner Bros, has several thousand 
more accounts now than when the 
pictures originally came out are un- 
derstood to be among the reasons 
for reviving them. 



CHARLIE EINFELD leaves Coast today for 
New York. 

BRYAN FOY, Director, BOB MONTGOMERY, 
JACK GOLDSTEIN and JULES FIELDS are in 
Chicago for the premiere of "Roger Touhy, 
Gangster." 

CHARLES MORRISON leaves the Coast ^"day 
for New York to confer with Jimmy Wat 
the company's presidency. 

HARRY M. KALMINE, assistant general" 
ager of the Warner circuit, has gone to Pitts- 
burgh for the dinner given for Clair Meeder, 
who has been named assistant to Joseph C. 
Petrillo, head of the American Federation of 
Musicians. He'll be back on Monday. 

OSCAR F. NEU, head of Neumade Products 
Corp., is back from an extended business trip 
to the Middle West. 

JOHN R. WOOD, JR., business manager of the 
March of Time, has gone to Washington for the 
cocktail party for Charles E. Peppiatt, newly 
installed 20th-Fox branch manager there. 

GLORIA SWANSON is playing at the Erlanger, 
Buffalo, in "Let Us Be Cay," the Rachel 
Crothers comedy. 

W. E. J. (Bill) MARTIN, drama editor of Ihe 
Courier-Express, (Buffalo, and MRS. MARTIN are 
on a Great Lakes vacation cruise. 

DAVE COPLAN, United Artists Canadian 
division manager, returns to Toronto today 
after a short visit to the home office. 

STEPHEN SLESINCER, head of Stephen Sles- 
inger, Inc., has returned from Hollywood. 

Skouras and Silverstone 
To England Late in Month 

Accompanied by Spyros Skouras, 
20th-Fox prexy, Murray Silverstone, 
vice-president in charge of foreign 
distribution, plans to leave late in 
the month on a long-contemplated 
trip to England. In the event that 
company business prevents Skouras 
from going, Silverstone will make 
the trip solo. Trip, plans for which 
were formulated shortly after Sil- 
verstone joined the company, has 
been marking time pending comple- 
tion of the National Theaters deal, 
among other things. 

Remodel Rio Theater 

Rio de Janeiro — Luiz Severiano 
Ribeiro Circuit is remodeling the 
Palacio Teatro in the center of the 
city. 



A NEW SERVICE 

GEORGE L. STONE, President 
POSITION SECURING BUREAU, Inc. 

with 22 years of achievement in the 
commercial employment agency field 
announces the inauguration of a new 
departmet devoted exclusively to 

RADIO & MOTION PICTURES 

under the personal supervision of 

FRANK McGRANN 

formerly Exploitation Director of 
Columbia Pictures, and for 20 years 
prominently connected with theatrical, 
radio and motion picture organizations. 

331 MADISON AVENUE, N. Y. C. 
Tel. MUrray Hill 2-6494 



Certified^ 



^Pp 



reciatioi^ 



^,. to the. 

Republic Pictures 

aorporatioa. 

Saxi Jr<xnci$co 

^e, the inmates of fan Queniln ?rifoa take 
Tj,Ltft , y° ur ye**-™™ kindness and 

TVe men eug crLy Look forward to *S?£^ 
Vn^LiTT' Tf v"**™* "One. as weU,^ 

our fellow mxn outside these walls Z 1 




(jroLt&fuUif %> 



ours. 



* San Q***"' 



\Oixr Z^aroLe*^ 





THE REHABILITATION OF THE MEN OF SAN Q 



* DAILY 



Friday, July 9, 1943 



Coe Pays Eloquent 
Tribute to Industry 



{Continued from Page 1) 

town there reaches across the civil- 
ized world actual beams of light 
which illumine for mankind the high- 
est standard of living, of broadened 
education and rampant opportunity 
that history has yet devised. It is 
less than 50 years since the first 
showing of a motion picture. , In 
that time motion pictures have be- 
come an indispensable part of civil- 
ized living." 

Coe„ introduced by Judge Harlan 
G. Palmer as "a representative of an 
industry which, in making its home 
among us, has made us known as mo- 
tion picture capital of the world," 
spoke on "Hollywood Looks Toward 
a New World." 

Governor Earl Warren also voiced a tribute 
to the industry, stressing' the "breadth and 
depth" challenge the future world will pose 
to films. 

Coe assured his listeners that "the indus- 
try will meet that challenge with courage, 
initiative and fidelity. 

"Uncle Sam, in his greatest need, turned 
to motion pictures to educate, to train, to 
prepare men and women for the Herculean 
task of world-wide war," he said. "Not 
only did motion pictures respond: I am proud 
to tell you that the industry performed with- 
out a thought of, or collection of, profit. 
As world figures go, a mere handful of hu- 
mans is 20,000. Yet here in Hollywood that 
average number wraps the civilized world in 
that gaiety and drama which is motion pic- 
tures. 

"No subject is so abstruse as to deny 
itself expression on the silver screen. A 
new method of learning is ours. How simple 
it is to learn with laughter in lesson, with 
graphic demonstration of principles involved, 
with interest at fever pitch as truth unfolds. 
Around us a new world dawns. Philoso- 
phically and materially, change is the order 
of the day. Achievements of war will con- 
tribute to the processes of peace. On land, 
on sea and under the sea, in the air, the 
new will supplant the old. Our home life 
will alter commensurately. 

"The motion picture industry will be 
alert to its increasing responsibilities in that 
new life. With photographic fidelity it will 
reveal to all the who, why, when and where 
of the march of progress. First offensive 
against ignorance must be knowledge. What- 
ever imparts knowledge easily and pleas- 
antly houses ambition and routs ignorance. 
Persaps that is the highest calling of motion 
pictures, because it presupposes knowledge 
and demands that most vital of all pic- 
ture elements — entertainment." 

"It is clear," he told his listeners, "that a 
generation of several peoples have been in- 
doctrinated with spurious philosophies of 
leachery, ignorance and greed, War will 
overcome these benighted peoples and their 
wanton leadership, but peace will have the 
problem of their remnants and offspring. 
Education alone can restore decency and 
democracy. And the motion picture is great- 
est instrumentality of education available 
to man." 



WEDDING BELLS 



Seattle, Wash. — Herndon Edmond, 
former branch manager here for 
20th Century-Fox, and Lorraine 
Armstrong of this city were married 
June 8 in Towson, Md., it is an- 
nounced. 



Peggy Dexter, British film player, 
and Lt. Joseph Rose of Minnesota, 
are engaged to be married. 




T T T 

• • • IT was "double feature" yester evening in the Chrysler 

Building's Cloud Club First oil. March of Time unleashed a special 

trade press preview of its latest issue, "Bill lack vs. Adolph Hitler" (and 
incidentally one of the company's best), and immediately thereafter held 
a reception and buffet supper for the genial and hard-hitting Howard 
Black, vice.-prexy of Time, Inc., and recently named sales and distribu- 
tion advisory solon by M of T From the 20th-Fox camp came Tom 

Connors, George Roberts, the three Bills (Clark, Gehring and Kupper). 
Martin Moskowitz, Murray Silverstone, Sam Sham, Dave Bader, et al, 
and from M of T the Messrs. Dick deRochemont and Phil Williams, plus 

Mary Johnson, assistant to Guest of Honor Black Ye Trade Press 

representatives comprised Don Mersereau, Chester B. Bahn, Sherwin 
"Sherry" Kane, Bill Formby. Jerry Jerauld, Mel Konecoff, Jim Cron, Mike 
Wier, Herb Fecke, Elizabeth Cunningham, Gertrude Merriam, Chet Fried- 
man, Floyd Stone, Charles Becker, and others Summary: The venue 

was lofty, and so was the quality of film and menu presented 

T ▼ T 

IATSE celebrates its golden anniversary on July 17. . . . 

• William B. Jaffe, prominent film attorney and legal advisor to the 
New York Area's WMC, is back at his desk following a brief illness. . . . 
Henri Elman, Chi. franchise holder for PRC, moves his exchange 

tomorrow to new and larger quarters The new address is 1327 5. 

Wabash Ave., and Henri will give a house-warming party to celebrate 
transplanting of his biz. ... Universal will test Jackie Kelk when 
the "Homer" of the airwaves Aldrich Family arrives in Hollywood on 
Aug. 5. . . . Columbia is shooting all-Sepia short, featuring Cootie 
Williams and His Band, with Laurel Watson, Eddie Vinson, and the 

Douglas Bros Harry Foster is directing, and Maxwell Cohn is in 

charge of production. ... 'Nother musical "notation": Korn Kob- 
blers band has landed the melody-purveying spot on WOR's "It Fays To 

Be Ignorant" program The lads have also completed a short for 

Paramount, titled "Rationed Rhythm". ... Spri?igfield, O., wafts 
word that Maj. Hal Roach is assigned to the Materiel Division of the 

Army Air Forces at Wright Field His task is to standardize pic 

photographic equipment Hal and his wife (the former Lucille 

Prim of Los Angeles) make their home in Springfield 

T ▼ ▼ 

• • • AVENGE PEARL HARBOR! 



Nebraska Variety Club 
To Hold Jamboree Monday 

Omaha — The Nebraska Variety 
club plans an all-day theatrical jam- 
boree at Peony Park Monday, to 
give the public a chance to meet 
those in the show business. Herbie 
Kay is donating his services to the 
event, proceeds of which will go to 
Variety club charities. The bands 
of Norton Wells and Paul Moorhead 
also will play. 

Guest of honor will be Jane Wy- 
man. Sale of War Bonds and Stamps 
will be pushed during the big pro- 
gram which includes athletic events, 
dancing, swimming and an exhibition 
baseball game by boys from Boys 
Town. 

E. I. Rubin is general chairman. 



Basil Complaints Tilt 
Arbitration in Buffalo 



Buffalo — Buffalo arbitration trib- 
unal has jumped into second place 
in the country in number of cases, 
with the filing by Basil Bros. The- 
aters of their third and fourth de- 
mands within two weeks. Both are 
clearance cases, naming the "Big 
Five" as defendants. (The Film 
Daily, July 7). 

Two intervenors have filed in a 
previous case brought by Basil Bros, 
on behalf of the Apollo, Buffalo, 
asking reduction of present 14-day 
clearance for Shea's Elmwood over 
the Apollo to immediately after the 
Elmwood. Buffalo Theaters, Inc., 
intervened on behalf of the Elm- 
wood, and M. M. Konczakowski in- 
tervened as operator of the Regent 
and the Grenor Corp. as owners of 
the Regent's property. 



IN NEW POSTS 



LEW SCHREIBER, executive assistant to Darryl 
Zanuck, Hollywood. 

HENRY PLUDE, manager, Fort Theater, Rock 
Island, III. 

EMMETT LOCKARD, manager, Omaha Theater, 
Omaha. , — 

TED EMERSON, manager, Paramount 1 r, 

Omaha. -' 

FRED PLESS, manager, Uptown, Des Moines. 

GEORGE LAWSON, manager, Roosevelt, Des 
Moines. 

Offer Morrison Co. 
Top Spot to Walker 

(Continued from Page 1) 

by Charlie Morrison, but that "be- 
fore I can even consider it, I will 
have to consult primarily with my 
present associates, the garment in- 
dustry and Harry Brandt and the 
exhibitors whom I am now serving." 

One of the factors which will 
largely determine any acceptance by 
Walker of the Morrison offer will 
be, according to its recipient, "the 
time that it would require." 

Consideration of the offer, Walker 
added, is being given by him chiefly 
because of the intimate friendship 
which has existed over a number of 
years between him and Morrison. 



NEIC Adds Speakers 
For Council Conference 



(Continued from Page 1) 

partment are added speakers for 
Thursday. 

Eddie Cantor attended the session. 
He will send a message to the Coun- 
cil meeting next week, it was stated. 

The latest organization to join the 
Council is Local 802, AFM. Several 
other organizations have scheduled 
meetings for next week to act on ad- 
herence to the Council. These in- 
clude the Radio Directors Guild, 
League of New York Theaters, 
IATSE, AGMA and WAC. 




JULY 9 

Claude C. Ezell Ralph Wilk 

Frank Namczy Al Steen 

1 JULY 10 
Dudley Murphy Sam Wood 

Joan Marsh 

JULY 11 
Sally Blane Walter Wanger 



Friday, July 9, 1943 



iftiu 

* DAILY 



Mellelf Reported 
Resigning from OWI 



(Continued from Page 1) 

derstandings with the industry, he 
was generally respected by all who 
df^ It with him, and the industry 
i ^—d in his support last month when 
Or^fjress threatened to eliminate the 
film bureau entirely. Only $50,000 
was allocated for OWI's domestic film 
activities, finally although over $1,- 
200,000 had been recommended by 
the budget bureau, and there simply 
was not enough that could be done 
by the bureau to warrant Mellett's 
remaining. 

The former Scripps-Howard editor 
said last night that he will return to 
his duties as a member of the Presi- 
dent's administrative staff, and said 
he did not expect to continue actively 
to work with the industry. 

Although Mellett will probably not 
leave OWI until late next week he 
will not be on hand for the meeting 
among major company representa- 
tives and OWI Director Elmer Da- 
vis and Domestic Director E. Palmer 
Hoyt, tentatively planned for early 
next week. Mellett said last night 
that he has not been asked to at- 
tend this meeting. (No date has 
yet been officially set' for the get- 
together, in which Hoyt and Davis 
hope to arrive at a satisfactory 
means of co-operation between OWI 
and the industry). 

Actually this meeting was planned 
before Mellett's resignation was re- 
ceived, but he was not asked to at- 
tend. This would indicate that his 
resignation came as no surprise to 
OWI officials, and seems to substan- 
tiate reports of friction between 
Mellett and others in the organiza- 
tion. 

There was no definite word on the 
status of Arch A. Mercey, Mellett's 
assistant, although his resignation is 
expected. 



Gene Buck Recovering 

Gene Buck, president of Ascap, 
underwent a minor operation at 
Presbyterian Hospital Medical Cen- 
ter. His condition is reported as 
excellent. 



STORKS 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Veronica Lake gave 
birth yesterday to a three-pound boy, 
two months prematurely. Son was 
placed in an incubator and her phy- 
sician reported both apparently were 
doing well. She went to the hospital 
last week following a studio fall. 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Lt. John Lowe, USN, 
and his wife, Ruby Keeler, are the 
parents of a daughter born here. 



A son, Ross Gaunt, Dolan, was born 
to Ken Dolan and his wife, Shirley 
Ross. 



£ REVIEWS Of the new fiLms A 



"Bomber's Moon" 

with George Montgomery, Annabella 
20th-Fox 70 Mins. 

WEAK WAR MELODRAMA IS TOO IM- 
PLAUSIBLE TO BE OF MUCH INTEREST 
TO OTHER THAN KID AUDIENCES. 

This "Bomber's Moon" doesn't shine 
brightly. A minor war melodrama, it will 
take a lot of talking up on the part of ex- 
hibitors to get audiences more than passab- 
ly interested in it. 

Chiefly in the film's favor is a certain 
amount of routine excitement of an artificial 
order that will draw response primarily from 
the kids. For the most part the production 
is a collection of tag-ends of war films in 
which the hero and the Gestapo play at 
hide-and-seek. 

The film is completely lacking in orig- 
inality, offering a story that comes perilous- 
ly close to boredom as it picks its way 
through a maze of implausibilities. The chief 
blame for this goes to Kenneth Garnet and 
Aubrey Wisberg, who pieced the screenplay 
together from a yarn by Leonard Lee. 
Charles Fuhr didn't help matters by his 
unimaginative direction of the film. 

Produced by Sol M. Wurtzel, the picture is 
one of those preposterous yarns about an 
American pilot who, after he has been 
forced down on German territory, plays a 
game of tag with the Nazis in which he 
makes complete asses of the enemy. At 
no time does the film carry conviction. 
What happens is stuff made only for young 
minds. 

This time the hero takes a gal, a Rus- 
sian army doctor, with him on his flight 
from the Nazis. It isn't violating a secret 
to say that the fellow falls in love with 
the gal. 

The final set-to, the one in which our 
hero escapes to England in the plane from 
which the Germans plan to bomb a train 
on which Winston Churchill is a passenger, 
is one for the book. It has the one virtue 
of bringing the film to an exciting close. 

The acting in general is uninspired. 
Gsorge Montgomery is the hero and Ana- 
bslla the gal. Among the others in the 
cast are Kent Taylor, Walter Kingsford, 
Martin Kosleck, Dennis Hoey, Robert Bar- 
rat. 

Cast: George Montgomery, Annabella, 
Kent Taylor, Walter Kingsford, Martin Kos- 
Isck, Dennis Hoey, Robert Barrat, Richard 
Graham, Kenneth Brown, Lionel Royce, Vic- 
tor Kilian, Robert Lewis, Felix Basch, Edith 
Evanson, George Davis, Mike Mazurki, Chris- 
tian Rub, Ilka Gruning, William Edmunds, 
Gisela Werbisek, Guy Kingsford, Wallis 
Clark, Reginald Sheffield, Ferike Boros, 
Hermine Sterler. 

CREDITS: Producer, Sol M. Wurtzel; Di- 
rector, Charles Fuhr; Screenplay, Kenneth 
Garnet, Aubrey Wisberg; Based on story by 
Leonard Lee; Cameraman, Lucien Ballard; 
Art Directors, James Basevi, Lewis Creber; 
Set Decorator, Thomas Little; Film Editor, 
Robert Fritch; Special Effects, Fred Sersen; 
Sound, George Leverett, Harry M. Leonard; 
Musical Score, David Buttolph; Musical 
Direction, Emil Newman. 

DIRECTION, Fair. PHOTOGRAPHY, 
Okay. 



Boost Evening Scales 

Buffalo — Evening admissions have 
been advanced a nickel, to 55 cents, 
by Basil's Lafayette, downtown first- 
run. Afternoon and children's prices 
are unchanged. 



"Law of the Northwest" 

with Charles Starrett 
Columbia 57 Mins. 

PICTURE OF NORTH COUNTRY CON- 
TAINS ACTION AND VILLAINY GALORE 
TO SATISFY DEMANDS OF ACTION 
FANS. 

This action film is nothing more than 
the western formula in a Northwest set- 
ting. The hero this time is a member of 
the Royal Mounted who gets his man after 
a series of exciting incidents that create 
a whirlwind of movement that will stir 
young fans aplenty. 

The hero is played by Charles Starrett 
and the head baddie, Douglas Leavitt. The 
two battle it out nip and tuck right down 
to the finish line, with Starrett emerging 
the winner by a wide margin. The fight 
is over the determination of the villain 
to prevent the construction of a road to 
connect with the Alcan Highway, the 
strategic Alaskan highway. Leavitt has 
sinister reasons for not wanting the road 
built. He even resorts to murder to stop 
the construction work. In his effort to 
stop Starrett from getting the goods on 
him the villain tries every means of dis- 
posing of the hero. Starrett comes through 
triumphantly after several close shaves with 
death. What helps to add to the excite- 
ment is the fact that the villain is a big 
man in the community whose true character 
is not known by the people. 

Starrett puts plenty of bite into his 
performance, while Leavitt enacts the vil- 
lain nicely. Others in important parts are 
Shirley Patterson, Authur Hunnicutt, Stan- 
ley Brown and Donald Curtis. 

Luci Ward's screenplay got slam-bang 
direction from William Berke. Jack Fier 
produced. 

CAST: Charles Starrett, Shirley Patter- 
son, Arthur Hunnicutt, Stanley Brown, 
Douglas Leavitt, Donald Curtis, Douglass 
Drake, Davidson Clark, Reginald Barlow. 

CREDITS: Producer, Jack Fier; Director, 
William Berke; Screenplay, Luci Ward; 
Film Editor, Jerome Thorns Cameraman, 
Benjamin Kline; Art Director, Lionel Banks. 

DIRECTION, All Right. PHOTOGRAPHY, 
Good. 



Kalmenson Sends Seed 
To Fill Midwestern Gap 

(Continued from Page 1) 

by Ben Kalmenson, general sales 
manager, at the opening session of 
the Chicago regional meeting in the 
Blackstone Hotel yesterday. 



"Coasted Command" July 19-20 

Ned E. Depinet, president of RKO 
Radio, announces that national trade 
screenings of "Coastal Command," 
English-made production distributed 
by the company, have been scheduled 
for Monday, July 19 at 11 a.m., with 
the following exceptions: Cincinnati, 
8:30 p.m.; New York, 11 a.m., and 
2:30 p.m.; Sioux Falls, 10 a.m.; and 
St. Louis, Tuesday, July 20 at 11:30 
a.m. 



Rites Held for Mrs. Hand 

Funeral services for Mrs. Florence 
S. Hand, wife of Stanley W. Hand, 
Altec staff representative, were held 
at Manhasset, L. I. 



* SHORTS * 



"Pacific Island No. 43" 

(This Is America) 

RKO 17 mins. 

Excellent 

The work of the Navy in rehabili- 
tating the sick and wounded at a 
jungle medical center on an un- 
named island somewhere in the Pa- 
cific is the subject of the latest 
of the "This Is America" series of 
shorts released by RKO Radio. The 
treatment is skillful and the mate- 
rial highly absorbing and interesting. 
The result is a short of tremendous 
audience appeal the booking of 
which should more than amply re- 
pay the exhibitor. The picture re- 
veals one phase of the Navy's ac- 
tivities not commonly known. It 
thus becomes an eye-opener — a fact 
which gives it box-office worth apart 
from its merits as entertainment. 

The operation of the jungle hos- 
pital and the activities of the con- 
valescents are shown in expert fash- 
ion. Included are many scenes 
showing measures taken to safe- 
guard the health of the patients and 
the staff against tropical diseases. 
The camera also takes the audience 
to the Bethesda (Md.) Naval Hos- 
pital for glimpses of the training of 
medical personnel for service at the 
island medical center. 

With the exception of the Be- 
thesda scenes the footage was shot 
by Navy cameramen. Produced by 
Frederic Ullman, Jr., the short has 
been excellently edited by Jay Bona- 
field. 



"Trifles That Win Wars" 

(Passing Parade) 

M-G-M 11 Mins. 

Highly Exploitable 

Romance on the screen is not con- 
fined to boy-meets-girl stuff. John 
Nesbitt has captured the romantic 
in this latest tab reel, which is both 
intriguing and instructive, too. Ex- 
hibitors with a real flare for promo- 
tional showmanship can rouse their 
communities via a clever and novel 
campaign built around a bottle, an 
ordinary billiard ball, and a spider's 
web. These three are the basis of 
the picture. The breaking of a cer- 
tain bottle led to the discovery of 
our modern shatter-proof glass; the 
billiard ball to the broad avenues of 
today's and tomorrow's plastics; and 
the spider's web to the use of amaz- 
ingly fine and accurate sight-lines 
used in present optical instruments. 
All are of vital consequence in win- 
ning the current war. A good ex- 
ploiteer can raise more hob with this 
reel than with many a feature. It's 
decidedly worth booking. 



Films for Alaskan Outposts 

Seattle, Wash. — Ed Lamb, branch 
manager for RKO Radio, is asking 
for 16 mm. films to send to service 
men in isolated positions in Alaska. 



I 



"<?i{< 



MRV 



Friday, July 9, 1943 



Magic Bridge Speeds 
Post-War Equipment 



(Continued from Page 1) 

by National, it provides to the thea- 
ter owiier or operator a practical 
span between his post-war needs and 
their rapid realization. Company of- 
ficials yesterday described the step 
as a special Equipment Survey cov- 
ering a theater's future require- 
ments of projection and sound, gen- 
erators and rectifiers, chairs, car- 
pets, screens, lenses, marquees, ven- 
tilating and all other new equipment 
that may be needed for replacement, 
modernization or complete new in- 
stallations, once the war has been 
won. 

In announcing the new plan yes- 
terday, Walter E. Green, president 
of NTS, lauded the recent statement 
of Col. H. A. Cole of Texas Allied 
who urged exhibitors to see their 
equipment dealers and survey their 
future needs with them. Green as- 
serted that via the "Magic Bridge" 
plan "exhibitors can now tell us what 
they want in the way of post-war 
equipment, and we, in turn, will 
arrange our manufacturing and de- 
livery schedules to provide all the 
equipment they need when peace- 
time production is resumed." 

The NTS exec, added that, in the com- 
pany's opinion, the survey is the medium 
which will best insure ample quantities of 
this new equipment, because it is based on 
the exhibitor's individualized requirements, 
and, furthermore, it provides a most accu- 
rate estimate of the quantity of new equip- 
ment National's manufacturing' units will 
need to make in order to give prompt de- 
liveries when production is resumed. 

Stressed by National in its announcement 
of the "Magic Bridge" Equipment Survey is 
that fact that it entails no obligation on the 
part of the exhibitor. "National does not 
want any exhibitor's money now for future 
equipment," Green explained, "for this war 
must be won first, and the place for an 
exhibitor's excess funds is in War Bonds 
rather than in anything else. In offering 
theater owners the 'Magic Bridge' for post- 
war equipment, no advance payments of any 
kind are involved, because through the con- 
tinuous purchase of War Bonds exhibitors 
can create their own post-war equipment 
fund." 

Green said that any exhibitor can use the 
plan simply by asking National to enter his 
theater's survey as a reservation on Nation- 
al's post-war delivery schedules. The 17 
years of National's experience in the equip- 
ment field is "positive assurance that exhib- 
itors will be able to get all the National 
equipment they need when the war has been 
won," Green concluded. 

Complete information on the "Magic 
Bridge" plan has just been mailed to theater 
interests and executives throughout the 
country. 



WAR SERVICE 

. . . on the Film Front 



Buffalo — Seven classes, totaling 171 
nurses' aides, of the Volunteer Nurses' Aide 
Corps of the Buffalo Red Cross, were gradu- 
ated in public evening ceremonies between 
programs on the stage of Shea's Buffalo 
Theater — the first time in the chapter's 
history that a theater auditorium was used 
for such ceremonies. It was designed to 
further acquaint the public with the or- 
ganization's work. 



TO THE COLORS! 



* DECORATED * 

2ND LT. HERBERT I. WEINER, USAAF, former- 
ly Columbia branch manager, Philadelphia, 
awarded the Soldier's Medal. 

-• — 

PROMOTED 

MARY TENSAR, WAC, formerly with Comerford, 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., to corporal. 



• ARMY * 

STAN BLACKBURN, manager, Paramount Thea- 
ter, Des Moines. 
JAMES CALLACHER, Granada, Olyphant, Pa. 
COMER JONES, Comerford, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

— • — 

* COAST GUARD * 

TOMMY HOGAN, Rialto, Scranton, Pa. 



Manpower Shortage Growing 

Graver Problem Likely, WB Sales Meet Told 



(Continued ft 

opening session, also reiterated War- 
ners' "open door" policy, with the 
sales force urged to take care of 
every exhibitor whose case is de- 
serving and to exercise careful judg- 
ment in distinguishing between gen- 
uine grievances and unjustified com- 
plaints. 

With the manpower situation like- 
ly to grow worse, Bernhard said the 
principal aim these days is to keep 
the organization going, to keep the 
ship afloat, until return of normal 
staffs and normal working condi- 
tions. 

Bernhard also gave the men a 
clear picture of the general business 
situation under wartime conditions 
and Government controls, while '"Kal- 



om Page 1) 

menson spoke on sales policies and 
the adaptation of number of releases 
to meet any market conditions. 

In the afternoon, Boy Haines conducted 
separate group meetings of his Midwest and 
Southern division, with Arthur Sachson, 
Howard Levinson, Norman H. Moray, A. W. 
Sehwalberg, Jules Lapidus, Ed Hinchy, Mike 
Dolid, Ralph L. McCoy, Hall Walsh and 
others participating. 

Special messages from Jack L. Warner, 
Maj. Albert Warner, Charles Einfeld and 
Mort Blumenstock were read at the morning 
session. Two new season's pictures, "Watch 
on the Rhine" and "Thank Tour Lucky 
Stars" were screened in the evening, using 
both Warner and Universal screening rooms 
to accommodate delegation of more than 
110. 

This morning, Kalmenson will present the 
new season's product lineup, with Albert 
Howson describing the pictures. Main busi- 
ness sessions wind up that afternoon with 
some small group meetings tomorrow. 



Mellett, Army in 
"Aleutians" Dispute 



(Continued from Page 1) 

with the Army. Again taking the 
part of the industry, Mellett has re- 
fused to clear for public release the 
50-minute Army film "Report From 
the Aleutians," made by Capt. John 
Huston, former Hollywood writer- 
director and son of actor Walter 
Huston. 

Mellett has recommended for OWI 
approval a shorter two-reel version 
of the same film, but the Army is 
holding out for the longer picture. 
In fact, Mellett admitted yesterday, 
he has not even been asked by the 
Army to clear the shorter version 
for public showing, nor to recom- 
mend it to the WAC. 

The two-reel version was prepared because 
the Army anticipated exhibitor complaints 
concerning the length of the film, but it was 
later decided that too much was lost from 
the picture by the extreme reduction in 
length. The Army apparently feels that not 
enough is left in the two-reeler to make it 
worth while showing it. Mellett, on the 
other hand, says that the shorter version is 
surprisingly good, and points out that be- 
cause it offers no great difficulties in the 
matter of programming it can be seen by 
far more people far sooner than in the 
longer version. It is important that this 
film get into distribution soon, he holds. 
He has recommended to OWI Director Elmer 
Davis and officials of the domestic branch 
that the short version be approved for public 
showing, and has refused to pass on the 
Army's recommendation that the longer ver- 
sion be offered the industry. 

This incident is reminiscent of that only a 
few months ago when Mellett held out to the 
end against public showing for Col. Frank 
Capra's "Prelude to War" with the Army 



Goldwyn, Mulvey to Host 
RKO Convention Delegates 

(Continued from Page 1) 

guests of Samuel Goldwyn and 
James Mulvey at a baseball party on 
Sunday. 

Invitations have been extended to 
more than 300 delegates to attend the 
double header scheduled between the 
Dodgers and Pittsburgh at Ebbets 
Field. Between games, the guests 
will be hosted at the Press Club in 
the ball park where a buffet luncheon 
and refreshments will be served. 

Sales meeting will start Monday, 
with a screening of two top A fea- 
tures, "Behind the Rising Sun" and 
"The Sky's the Limit," at the Trans- 
Lux theater, starting promptly at 
8:55 a.m. 

Following the screening, the delegates will 
assemble for luncheon in the Wedgewood 
Room of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, and at 
2 p.m. they will begin their first business 
session in the Sert Room, with Prexy Ned E. 
Depinet presiding and A. A. Schubart, ex- 
change operations chief, calling the roll. 

Walt Disney organization will be repre- 
sented at the sessions by Roy Disney, James 
Finey, Kay Kamen, Gunther Lessing, William 
Levy, W. Lowenberg, Leo Samuels and F. 
Waldheim, while acting for Sam Goldwyn 
will be James Mulvey, Lester Rawson, W. 
Heineman, B. Fish and Mort Nathanson, 
Louis Hyman and Seymour Poe will sit in 
for Sol Lesser. RKO Pathe's contingent will 
include Frederic Ullman, Jr., Walton C. 
Ament, Jay Bonafield, Dudley Hale and Frank 
Eaton. 



insisting that the film be offered theaters. 
One of Mellett's chief objections then, and 
also the industry's chief objection, was the 
length of the film — about the same as the 
longer version of "Report From the Aleu- 
tians." In the face of strong Army pres- 
sure. Mellett was over-ruled by OWI director 
Davis and Gardner Cowles, Jr., then domestic 
director. 



ncuywccD 

DIGEST 



< 



SIGNED 

LOU EDELMAN, producer, Columbia. 
SALLY BENSON, screenplay, "Experiment Peril- 
ous," RKO. 
JOHN MURRAY ANDERSON, termer, M- 
TOM LONDON, termer, Republic. 

ASSIGNMENTS 

LESLIE STORM and LESTER SAMUELS, screen- 
play, "Heart of a City," Columbia. 

HOWARD ESTABROOK, screenplay, "The Hairy 
Ape," Jules Levey-UA. 

LEE CARMES, cameraman, "Jack London," Sam- 
uel Bronston-UA. 



CASTINGS 

DICK PURCELL, TIM RYAN and FRANK FAY- 
LEN, "The Thirteenth Cuest," Monogram; PAUL 
MUNI, "At Night We Dream," Columbia; RITA 
HAYWORTH and JAMES BLAIR, "Heart of a 
City," Columbia; RITA JOHNSON, "Ministry 
of Fear," Paramount; ANNE BAXTER, "Am- 
bassador Dodd's Diary," 20th-Fox; DOUGLAS 
FOWLEY, "See Here, Private Hargrove," M-C-M; 
MARIA PALMER, "Revenge," RKO; HARRY 
CAREY, "Ambassador Dodd's Diary," 20th-Fox 
HORACE MacMAHON, "Timber Queen," Para- 
mount; FRANKLIN PANGBORN, "Hair the Con- 
quering Hero," Paramount; LOUISE CURRIE, 
"The Masked Marvel" (serial', Republic 



V 



REOPTIONED 

LIONEL BARRYMORE, M-C-M. 

SCHEDULED 

"The Honor System," producers, SAM KATZ- 

MAN-JACK DIETZ, Monogram. 
"The Voodoo Man," producers, SAM KATZMAN- 

JACK DIETZ, Monogram. 
"Romance of Avenue B," producers, SAM KATZ- 

MAN-JACK DIETZ, Monogram. 
"Harvest Melody," producer, WALTER COLMES, 

PRC. 



Reisman Appoints Beja 
RKO's Chilean Manager 

Appointment of Rene Beja as man- 
ager of RKO Radio's Chilean office 
with headquarters in Santiago is an- 
nounced by Phil Reisman, vice-pres- 
ident of RKO Radio in charge of 
foreign distribution. 

Beja, who replaces Dan Green- 
house who resigned to enter the U. 
S. Army, has been with RKO Ra- 
dio's foreign service for a number of 
years and formerly managed the or- 
ganization's office in Mendoza, and, 
previously, the Portugal branch in 
Lisbon. His successor at Mendoza 
is J. M. Calveira. 



Single Bills In Two 

Buffalo — The two biggest down- 
town first-runs are currently play- 
ing single bills — the first time in 
years both have done so in the same 
week. Shea's Buffalo has "Action 
in the North Atlantic" and Shea's 
Great Lakes offers "Stage Door 
Canteen." 



The 

FEMME TOUCH 



MRS. PEARL FORT, manager, Eastown, Dei 

Moines. 
MILLICENT SMITH, B. F. Shearer Office, Seat-. 

tie. * 



75? 




BIGGEST "BOX OFFICE GROSS" 
OF ANY MOVIE MAGAZINE 



MONTH AFTER MONTH THE PUBLIC PAYS MORE 

MONEY FOR PHOTOPLAY — THE INDUSTRY'S 

LUXURY MAGAZINE — THAN FOR ANY OTHER 

MOVIE MAGAZINE PUBLISHED 



o nd of unvHW- « 




HIT No. 3 



HIT No. 4 



HOWARD HAWKS' 

CORVETTE K-225 
-FRONTIER BAD MEN 1 





Balance these Universal hit shows with UniversaPs 
entertaining Featurettes . . . Have you played 
Harry James in "Trumpet Serenade"— a Universal 
*Name Band' Musical?, 



, 35IN THE "SHANGR)-IA" WAR STAMP DRIVE DURING JULY! 



2(iW. 44TH ST 
N . Y. C . 



Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 




FILE COPY 

Lot REMOVE 



The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



L 84, NO. 7 



NEW YORK, MONDAY. JULY 12. 1943 



TEN CENTS 



CLARKTO MEET EXECS. ON N. Y^DECREE 

WAC Divisions Meet Friday on War Pix Setup 



Reeling 'Round -- 
WASHINGTON 



= By ANDREW H. OLDER = 

—WASHINGTON 
THE lowdown on the sudden excitement 
' over raw stock in Argentina last Win- 
ter goes like this. For a decade before 
the war Argentina had been getting most of 
its film from Germany, and had a huge 
supply of raw stock on hand last year from 
Germany. Most of it was to be used to 
print Nazi propaganda films for South Amer- 
ican distribution. Nearly all of it — several 
million feet — was stored in a single ware- 
house under close supervision. . . . One day 
a Government inspector turned up to look 
over the stock. Whether he realized what 
he was doing is an open question to which 
we can get no answer from CIAA or the 
State Department, but he carried with him 
an extremely powerful hand light which he 
used as he checked labels, quantities, etc. 
. . . The next day some of the film was 
withdrawn and found to be ruined. Hastily 
the rest of the stock was checked, and it 
was learned that practically all of it had 
been exposed by the Government man's 
light. . . . Purely accidental, of course! . . . 
Shortly thereafter a special emissary came 
up here to try to get raw stock for the 
Argentine industry, and ClAA's policy of 
being tough about raw stock began to mean 
something in Buenos Aires. 



£ARTER BARRON, Loew's division man- 
^ager here, has started doing a bit of 
on-the-spot recruiting. Large outlays for 
newspaper want-ads haven't begun to bring 
in the help he needs, so a couple of weeks 
ago Carter had signs set in the lobbies of 
the three Loew's houses on F Street. Young 
men and women interested in a career in 
theater management were told to contact 
the manager. In addition he had trailers 
with similar copy flashed on all three 
screens. . . . About 30 people were interest- 
ed enough to contact the manager at the 
Capitol, with similar results in the first 
10 days at the Palace and the Columbia. 
Although there were plenty of 17-year-old 
girls who walked in to ask about jobs as 
assistant manager, a couple of prospects for 
managerial career men were discovered, and 
Carter is confident that he may be able 
to enlist others to fill ushering jobs. 

• • 

£LMER DAVIS didn't put up any sort of 
a scrap for OWI film production in 

{Continued on Page 2) 




Third War Loan Drive 
And NEIC Relationship 
Also on Parley Agenda 



Three main divisions of the indus- 
try's War Activities Committee set- 
up, — the chairmen of Exhibitors' 
Committees of the 31 exchange cen- 
ters, the WAC's National Co-ordi- 
nating Committee, and the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the Theaters 
Division — , will meet for the first 
time Friday to discuss what is de- 
scribed as an "extremely important 
agenda," it was announced on the 
week-end. Venue is the local Hotel 
Astor, and the parley, which will 

(Continued on Page 12) 



,400 Feature Prints 
To Troops Overseas 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — The film industry 
has been furnishing 16 mm. prints 
of the latest and best features and 
shorts for our troops overseas for 
slightly over a year now and 4,400 
feature prints have gone out for 
such showings, as of June 30, an 
official of the Army's Special Ser- 
vice Division revealed Saturday. 

In recent months, he stated, the 

(Continued on Page 15) 



Seidelman Names Daff 
Foreign Sales Supervisor 

Joseph H. Seidelman, Universal's 
vice-president in charge of foreign 
affairs, announced on the week-end 
the appointment of Alfred Daff, "U" 

(Continued on Page 10) 



ODLUM GREETS 
RKO DELEGATES 

Depinet Presides as Sales 
Meeting Opens Here 



Floyd B. Odium, chairman of the 
RKO Corp. board, will make his first 
official appearance before the RKO 
Radio sales force 
this afternoon 
when he will de- 
liver a greeting | 
to the 300 dele- 
gates assembled 
in session at the 
company's twelfth 
annual sales 
meeting in the 
Sert Room of the 
Waldorf - Astoria. 

Odium, elected 
to the chairman- 
ship on June 2, is 
president of Atlas 
Corp. which has 
a major stock in- 
terest, in RKO. 

Ned E. Depinet, RKO Radio presi- 
dent, will preside, and on the dais 

(Continued on Page 14) 




FLOYD B. ODLUM 



Para, to Bare First Block 
For 1943-44 at Sales Meet 



Sales and releasing policies of 
"For Whom the Bell Tolls" and 
other Paramount product, including 
pictures for 1943-44, and advertising 
plans, will be discussed at the semi- 
annual sales meeting at the Hotel 

(Continued on Page 10) 



Safeguard 6 Gains— Bernhard 

Post-War Major Task, WB Sales Meet Told 



More Calif. Towns to Get 
Theater Defense Bureaus 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Los Angeles — Because of the re- 
sults attained by the Los Angeles 
Theater Defense Bureau in prepar- 
ing theaters for any wartime emerg- 

(Continued on Page 15) 



Chicago— One of the major tasks 
of the motion picture industry in the 
post-war period will be the safe- 
guarding of six important gains 
achieved in the present era, declared 
Joseph Bernhard, Warner Bros.' 
vice-president, addressing Friday 
morning's session of the company's 
second regional sales meeting in the 

(Continued on Page 12) 



Coast Trip Late in July 
To Precede N. Y. Visit and 
Swing of Regional Offices 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington— Tom C. Clark, As- 
sistant Attorney General in charge 
of the Anti-Trust Division, who re- 
vealed last month 
that he intends to 
handle the Gov- 
ernment's case 
against the "Big 
Five" personally 
in November, 
when the trial 
period of the New 
York consent de- 
cree ends, will 
probably talk to 
producer and dis- 
tributor heads 
within the next 
month, as well as 
to exhibitors in 
TOM G. CLARK several sections. 
Clark has a definite date in Denver 

(Continued on Page 10) 




Samson to 20th-Fox 
Top Spot in Canada 



Buffalo — Ira Cohn, formerly Pitts- 
burgh branch manager for 20th-Fox, 
now at the New York home office, 
is scheduled to arrive here today to 
succeed Sydney Samson as Buffalo 
branch manager. Latter has been 

(Continued on Page 15) 



Metro to Dub Six in 
French and Italian 

West Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Metro has picked six 
features for quick dubbing into 
French and Italian and has signed 
eight French and four Italian players 
in New York who will come to the 
studio. fix picked are "Ziegfeld 
Girl," "Strike Up the Band," "As- 
signment in Brittany," "Shop Around 
the Corner," "Waterloo Bridge" and 
"I Love You Again.' Warners al- 
ready are dubbing; Paramount and 
Universal are expected to do like- 
wise. 



WSs 



Monday, July 12, 1943 




Vol. 84, N 


). 7 Mon., July 12, 


1943 


10 Cents 


JOHN W. 


ALICOATE 




Publisher 


DONALD 


M. MERSEREAU : 


Ceneral 


Manager 



CHESTER B. BAHN :::::: Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address- 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco-Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



FINANCIAL 



(July 9) 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat 16% 16'/ 2 16% + % 

Col. Picts. vtc. (2Vi,%) 

Columbia Picts. pfd.. 41 40 Vi 40i/ 2 + Vi 

Con. Fm. Ind 3 2% 2% — % 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd... 17 17 17 

East. Kodak 166 16514 165% — Vz 

do pfd 

Gen. Prec. Eq 22V 2 22 22l/ 2 + Vz 

Loew's, Inc 61% 61% 61% + % 

Paramount 293/ 8 28% 29% + % 

RKO 91/4 9% 91/4 

RKO ?6 pfd 96 95 96 + 1 1/4 

20th Century-Fox . 21 Vz 2]% 21 1/2 + % 
20th Century-Fox pfd. 32% 32% 32% + V* 

Univ. Pict. pfd 

Warner Bros 

do pfd 15% 143/4 147/ g — % 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Monogram Picts 3% 3% 3% 

Radio-Keith cvs 1 % 1 % 1 % 

Sonotone Corp 3% 3% 3*A — Vs 

Technicolor 13y 4 12% 13i/ 4 + Vz 

Trans-Lux 3% 3V 4 3% 

Universal Corp. vtc 

Universal Picts 



Donat First to Air 
Invasion of Sicilv 



Robert Donat, film star, was the 
first to tell the world at 12:20 a.m. 
Saturday EWT over a BBC hook-up 
from Algiers that the United Nations 
had invaded Sicily. 



Smith Installs Peppiatt 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Charles E. Peppiatt, 
20th-Fox's newly appointed branch 
manager was honored at a party 
here, at the Variety Club, which was 
attended by leading exhibitors of the 
territory and members of the press. 
A. W. Smith, Jr., the company's East- 
ern sales manager, was in charge of 
the installation ceremony. 



H The Broadway Parade ® 

Picture and Distributor Theater 

Mission to Moscow (Warner Bros. Pictures) — Uth week Hollywood 

Coney Island (Twentieth Century-Fox Films) — 4th week Roxy 

Stage Door Canteen (United Artists-Sol Lesser) — 3rd week Capitol 

The Youngest Profession (Metro-Coldwyn-Mayer Pictures) — 3rd week Music Hall 

Dixie (Paramount Pictures) — 3rd week Paramount 

Best Foot Forward (<Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) — 3rd week Astor 

Background to Danger (Warner Bros. Pictures) — 2nd week Strand 

Bombardier (RKO Radio Pictures) — 2nd week Criterion 

Two Tickets to London (Universal Pictures) — 2nd week Rialto 

Somewhere in France (United Artists) Globe 

Action in the North Atlantic (Warner Bros. Pictures) (a-b) Palace 

Prairie Chickens (United Artists-Hal Roach) (a) Palace 

No Escape (Monogram Pictures) — Opens tomorrow (a) New York 

Wild Horse -Rustlers (Producers Releasing Corp.) — Opens tomorrow (a) New York 

♦ FOREIGN LANGUAGE FEATURES ♦ 

The Russian Story (Artkino Pictures) — 6th week Stanley 

Marvels of the Bullring (Croves-Mohme) — 2nd week Belmont 

A Fire in the Straw (Herbert Rosener) — 2nd week (a) World 

A Pledge to Bataan (Adventure Pictures) — 2nd week (a-d) World 

♦ FUTURE OPEIMIMiS ♦ 

For Whom the Bell Tolls— July 14 Rivoli 

Stormy Weather (Twentieth Century-Fox) — July 21 Roxy 

Let's Face It (Paramount Pictures) — Aug. 2 Paramount 

This is the Army (Warner Bros. Pictures) — July 28 Hollywood 

DuBarry Was a Lady (Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures) (c) Capitol 

Mister Lucky (RKO Radio Pictures) (c) Music Hall 

Victory Through Air Power (United Artists-Walt Disney) — July 17 Globe 

The Constant Nymph (Warner Bros. Pictures) — July 23 Strand 

Hers to Hold (Universal Pictures) (c) ." Criterion 

Appointment in Berlin (Columbia Pictures) (c) Rialto 

My Friend Flicka (Twentieth Century-Fox) — July 15 (a-b) Palace 

All By Myself (Republic Pictures)— July 15 (a) Palace 

Hotel Concordia (Crovos-Mohme) (c) Selmont 

(a) Dual bill, (b) Subsequent run. (c) Follows current bill, (d) News film with 
commentary in English. 



Reeling 'Round' - 
WASHINGTON 



(Continued from Page 1) 
his appearance before the Senate Judiciary 
committe, it develops. 

"The production of 35 mm. films for 
theatrical use" probably could be done en- 
tirely by the industry though the present 
arrangement of our making half of them 
works very well," he told the senators, 
adding that "the industry no doubt would 
be willing to make 52 each year". . . . Davis 
seemed a bit more anxious to retain the 
16 mm. program, but certainly was not 
fighting for it. His tone throughout the 
whole brief portion of the committee hear- 
ing dealing with the pix bureau was ex- 
tremely conciliatory. 



"Watch on the Rhine" 
Tradeshows on July 26 



"Watch on the Rhine," initial re- 
lease on Warner schedule for next 
season, will be nationally tradeshown 
July 26, Ben Kalmenson announces. 
Another 1943-44 release, "Murder on 
the Waterfront," will be tradeshown 
same day. 



HELP 



IF YOU ARE HAVING DIFFI- 
CULTY FINDING THE RIGHT 
PERSON FOR ANY VACANCY 
IN YOUR ORGANIZATION- 
CALL 
FRANK McGRANN 

POSITION SECURING BUREAU, INC. 

(AGENCY) 
331 Madison Ave. (43rd St.), N. Y. 

MURRAY HILL 2-6494 



Ed Peskay Resigns 

As Small"s Representative 



Edward J, Peskay has resigned as 
representative for Edward Small. 



1 HR. From New York!«HUl 

BEAUTIFUL FARM 

• 12 RM. MAIN HOUSE; 4 BATHS! 

• GUEST HOUSE; KEEPER'S HOUSE! 

• GARAGES AND SCREENING ROOM! 

• COMPLETE RCA EQUIPMENT! 

• BARNS WITH 23 BOX STALLS! 

• DOG KENNELS! 
Complete Facilities for Raising 
Horses, Cows, Chickens, Pigs! 

SO ACRES CULTIVATED 

120 Acres Gorgeous Woodland 

PERFECT FOR MOTION 
PICTURE EXECUTIVE 

. . . wishing to aid War Effort By 
Growing Produce, Stock, for Ready 
New York Market . . . YET WHO 
WANTS TO TEND TO REGULAR M.P. 
BUSINESS AFFAIRS! 

WILL TRADE FOR 
SIMILAR FARM IN SAN 
FERNANDO VALLEY, CAL! 

(OR WILL SELL OUTRIGHT) 

• PROPERTY LOCATED IN NO. 
WESTCHESTER COUNTY— 58 MIN. 
FROM TIMES SQUARE! 

WRITE— 

BOX 165, e/o FILM DAILY 

1501 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



Ampa to Dedicate Service 
Flag to Publicists in Uniform 



A service flag in honor of all film 
advertising, publicity and exploita- 
tion employes who have donned uni- 
forms will be dedicated at Ampa's 
first Fall meeting, scheduled to be 
held on Sept. 15 at a hotel yet to be 
selected, it was announced at the 
week-end. 

Ampa's board has set a meeting 
for July 22 and will meet period 1- 
ly until the Fall. Its membei .1- 
clude William Ferguson, Paul Ben- 
jamin, Hal Home, Blanche Livings- 
tone, Vincent Trotta, James Zabin, 
Rutgers Neilson, Dave O'Malley and 
Hap Hadley. 

Membership Committee will meet 
shortly to act on 20 applications. 
Appointment of other committees by 
President Trotta is expected in a 
week or 10 days. 

Midnight 'Previews' Banned 

Ardmore, Okla. — The City Council 
has passed an ordinance banning 
local "prevues" on Saturday mid- 
night. 



NEW YORK 
THEATERS 



RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL 

ROCKEFELLER CENTER 

THE YOUNGEST PROFESSION' 

with 

VIRGINIA WEIDLER, EDWARD ARNOLD 

and Five Important Guest Stars 

AN M-G-M PICTURE 

NEW MARCH OF TIME 

Gala Stage Revue # Symphony Orchestra 

First Mezzanine Seats Reserved. Circle 6-4600 



J^ BETTY GRABLE -fc 

GEORGE MONTGOMERY* CESAR ROMERO 

COMir 1SIAND 

A 20TH CCNTUSY-FOX HCTUS.E in TECHNICOLOR 

• PLUS A BIG STAGE SHOW * 

BUY Q f\ y y 7M.AVE. 

BONDS HV/A I 50th ST. 



"DIXIE" 

with 

BING CROSBY 

DOROTHY LAMOUR 

A Paramount Picture 



In Person 

ANDREWS SISTERS 

TIM HERBERT 

MITCH AYRES 

and his orchestra 



Cool 



PARAMOU NT Times Square 



IZIEQ 



Humphrey Bogart • Raymond Ma 

"ACTION IN NOHTH ATLANTIC" 

and 

"PRAIRIE CHICKENS" 

JIMMY ROGERS . NOAH BEERY, JR. 




loTw. STATE 



ON SCREEN 
JEAN ARTHUR 
JOEL McCREA 

"THE MORE 
THE MERRIER" 




i 7^ 




T 3 LOS ANGELES HOUSES. IN N.Y. AT THE STRAND; ALSO MICHIGAN, DETROIT; 
MRNER, MEMPHIS; STANLEY, PHILLY; EARLE & AMBASSADOR, WASH.; AND MORE! 



GEORGE SYDNEY 

RAFT* GREENSTREET 
"Background to Danger"^ 

with PETER LORRE . Brenda Marshall 

Directed by RAOUL WALSH 

Screen Play by W. R. Burnett* From a Novel by Eric Ambler 

Keep Selling The "Shangri La" Stamp Drive.' 




SVCBW m 7V£ HOKM ATLANTIC ' 




BUD 



LOU 



imOIMKIHM 

GINNY SIMMS 

PATRIC KNOWLES ELYSE KNOX 

and 

JOHNNY LONG and His Orchestra 

HELEN YOUNG • GENE WILLIAMS • THE FOUR TEENS 

with 

50 -SKATING BEAUTIES -50 

Screen Play, Robert Lees • Frederic Rinaldo • John Grant 
Original Story, True Boardman 

Directed by CHARLES LAMONT Produced by ALEX GOTTLIEB 



TRADE 
PRESS 
UNANIMOUSLY 

STAMPS 



JOIN THE "SHANGRI-LA" WAR STAMP DRIVE DURING JULY! 



ii 



ik 



THEIR ALL TIME BEST!" 



— BOXOFFICE 



SOLID LAUGH ENTERTAINMENT! 



ff 



—VARIETY 



"FUNNIEST AND BEST TO DATE! 



99 



-FILM DAILY 



"THE COMEDIANS' BEST TO DATE!" 



■DAILY VARIETY 



"A&C IN RIOTOUS TOP FORM! 



ff 



—HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 



"EXCELLENT! ESCAPIST ENTERTAIN 
MENT WITH TWO CAPITAL PS!" 



—MOTION PICTURE HERALD 




The Record -Breaking Business 
in first engagements proves 
that the public says: "DITTO!" 




UNIVERSAL PICTURE 



m 



Monday, July 12, 1943 



DAILY 



Navy Film Program 
For War Workers 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — A comprehensive 
motion picture production and dis- 
tribution program for the exclusive 
exhibition to war workers in plants 
is now under way, Admiral C. H. 
Woodward, Chief of the Industrial 
Incentive Division, U. S. Navy, an- 
nounced Friday. 

A group of short subjects, stress- 
ing the role of the war worker and 
his importance to the fighting men 
of the Navy, already have been pro- 
duced, and a large variety _ of sub- 
jects is planned. First subjects in- 
clude "Full Speed Ahead," "This is 
Guadalcanal," "The Navy Flies On," 
"Mary Smith, American," "The Life 
and Death of the Hornet," "The Bat- 
tle in Shop 14" and "Sub Builders 
of the Navy." "Hornet" subject will, 
it is said, be "the entire story of the 
'Shangri-La' from which Gen. Jimmy 
Doolittle's planes took off when they 
bombed Tokyo." 

Because they are of "restricted" 
nature and are designed for the 
workers, these films will not be shown 
in commercial theaters. Some com- 
mercial films, however, which illus- 
trate the close relationship between 
the plant and shipyard workers and 
the men of the fleet, will be included 
in the program for exhibitions in 
the plants. 

The films are being produced by 
the Industrial Incentive Division, 
with distribution on a nation-wide 
basis through the facilities of com- 
mercial local distributors. The dis- 
tributor is permitted to make a nom- 
inal charge of $1.00 plus transpor- 
tation charges. 

It has been arranged with the film 
distributors to furnish 16 mm. pro- 
jectors and projectionists where 
plants do not have these facilities. 
Projection points have been estab- 
lished in 300 localities. 

The Industrial Incentive Division 
has completed successful tests with 
a number of plants, and has now 
launched the program on a perma- 
nent basis, it is said. 




Lipskin to Join Donahue & Coe 

Lawrence H. Lipskin is resigning 
at Columbia to affiliate with Dona- 
hue & Coe, it was reported at the 
week-end. 




Mike Connolly 
Tod Browning 
Jetta Goudal 



Hunt Stromberg 

Jean Hersholt 

Sam Mintz 



Exhibitor Profiles: The Latchis Bros. 

• • • THAT ill wind, — th, hurricane of Sept. 21, 1938 — , did blow 

somebody good, namely the film fans of Brattleboro, Vt On the 

following day, when the storm died down and the owners and opera- 
tors of more than 1,000 pic stands in New York and New England were 
contemplating losses to their properties in excess of $2,500,000 (and 
doubtless a great deal more), a brand new cinema opened in the afore- 
mentioned Green Mountain State community Though fallen trees 

littered hills and mountainsides in the vicinity, and ears still rang from 
the thundering blasts of departed wind, the formal bow of the Latchis 
Theater was a gay and memorable event for Brattleboro. residents, and 
a triumph for the four Latchis Brothers, — Spyros D., Peter D., Emmanuel 
D„ and John D 

T ▼ ▼ 

• • • EVEN while the theater was in the course of construc- 
tion, indeed during its early planning, it was an awe-exacting topic 

among New England showmen The house, a 1,400 seater with 

a small balcony, was incorporated in the ultra-modern Latchis Me- 
morial Building, reared at the same time on the corner of Main and 
Flat Streets in memory of Demetrious Peter Latchis, founder of Lat- 
chis Enterprises and father of the four boys The Memorial 

Building is a small city in itself, housing as it does the theater, stores, 
the Latchis Hotel, and the latter's air cooled restaurant, main ban- 
quet and ballroom, and solarium, cocktail and flower room One 

could live indefinitely and in luxury on the premises In Sum- 
mertime, Spring and Autumn, the accent is on the tourist and gen- 
eral traveling trade In Wintertime upon the added influx of 

ski enthusiasts, attracted to the snow-clad environs, including Brattle- 
boro's world-renowned ski-jump 

▼ T T 

• • • BUT the theater, conceived and executed in the classic 
Greek tradition, is primarily for and of native population, drawing norm- 
ally (when gasoline is more plentiful than the sap of sugar maples) not 
only on the populace of the city, but its outlying areas, including sec- 
tions of Southwest New Hampshire and Northern Massachusetts hard 

by Among the splendid decorative murals are Achilles' Education 

By Chiron The Centaur, and Bacchus, God Of The Theater, And 

Ariadne Oddly enough, the official headquarters of the Latchis 

theater circuit is in the hotel Over both presides Peter D„ the 

treasurer, whose residence is dual, i.e., in the hostelry and on his 

estate farm in New Hampshire Spyros and John, like Peter, keep 

in close touch with all the various increments of the so-called Latchis 

Enterprises Emmanuel is in Uncle Sam's Army The theater 

circuit comprises 15 houses in Vermont, New Hampshire and Massa- 
chusetts They play M-G-M, Warner, 20th-Fox, UA, Universal and 

Republic product Every link in the chain is the hot-bed of its re- 
spective situation's war activities All industry drives aimed at 

the war's winning are "Exhibit A," — the Brothers being as flaming 

patriots as the lads of Ethan Allen, John Stark and loseph Warren 

Playing on the name of their own city, folk in Keene, N. H., call the 
Latchis boys "The Keen(e) Showmen" And in Brattleboro when in- 
quiry is made by a stranger concerning the location of the Latchis 
Theater, the sly native will say, inasmuch as a little stream empties into 
Connecticut River near the film house, and the latter is decorated 
in the classic style of ancient Hellas: "You'll find it right over yonder, 
where creek meets Greek" 

T T ▼ 

• • • AVENGE PEARL HARBOR! 



COminG and G0IDG 



0. HENRY BRICCS, ARTHUR GREENBLATT 
and NAT LEFTON of PRC left for the Coast 
Friday. 

CHARLES EINFELD is expected here today 
from the Coast. 

JACK GOLDSTEIN, 20th-Fox publicity man- 
ager, and BOB MONTGOMERY, executive>-<ttt- 
ant to Hal Home, the company's ad-f/- Ity 
chief, went to Chicago over the week- y\n 
connection with the screening of "Roger To'uhy, 
Gangster," at Stateville Prison, Joliet, 111., 
today. 

KEN THOMSON arrives today from the Coast. 

STEVE BROIDY, Monogram's general sales 
manager, is due today from Chicago to make 
his headquarters here for the next couple cf 
months, during which he will visit his com- 
pany's Eastern branches. 

BUSTER CRABBE, PRC's western star, has ar- 
rived in town. He will return to the Coast 
early in August. 

MURPHY McHENRY, Paramount studio pub- 
licist, has arrived from Hollywood for the open- 
ing of "For Whom the Bell Tolls." 

SGT. D. JOHN PHILLIPS, former Paramount 
short subjects publicity head, is in town from 
Ft. Monmouth on furlough en route to a South- 
ern California AAF base. 

CEORGE HARVEY, in charge of shorts publicity 
at Paramount, is on vacation at Shelter Island 
off Long Island's North shore. 

JAMES DONOHUE, Paramount's Dallas man- 
ager, and his family, are in Chicago for a 
holiday. 

WILLIAM PINE is en route to New York from 
Hollywood. 

RODNEY PANTACES is a New York arrival. 

ROBERT COLDEN arrievs from Hollywood to- 
day. 

CHARLES COBURN flew here from the Coast 
Saturday; he returns in a fortnight. 

HAROLD ORLOB is back from Hollywood to 
produce "Hairpin Harmony," musical farce in 
late August. 

LOUIS VERNEUIL has arrived on the Coast. 

PERCE PEARCE of the Walt Disney organiza- 
tion has arrived from the Coast for the July 17 
Globe opening of "Victory Through Air Power," 
of which he was story director. 

JAMES MOYNAHAN of the March of Time 
publicity department is vacationing at Province- 
town, Mass. 

BETTE DAVIS is in New York for a few days 
before proceeding to the Coast. 



Coward Pic Opens in Mexico 

Mexico City (By Cable)— United 
Artists launched "In Which We 
Serve" with a gala opening at the 
Alameda Theater, sponsored by 
British charities, and according to 
Joe Goltz, local UA manager, was 
the best Mexico opening in three 
years. 



Son of Earl Arnold 
Slain in Sea Action 

Rochester — Robert Victor Arnold, 
son of Earl Arnold, manager of the 
Diana, in nearby Medina, was 
jfi&t killed in action in the North 
1^5 African war zone on July 1, 
it has been reported here. A 
seaman second class, Arnold was 
rescued a few months ago after the 
ship on which he was serving was 
sunk by enemy action. 





for extra time for the super-sensation that's 
headed your way this season . • . . Ask your 
RKO Exchange NOW about availability . . . 
and take a look at this sample of the 
advertising on the next page . • . 



■MM 



• 







gw 




THE HARSH TRUTH ABOUT 

THE J APS !... Exposing those ruth- 
less enemies even more frankly than 
"Hitler's Children" bared the shame of 
the Nazis! . . . Dynamite drama that ex- 
plodes a thundering blast of passionate 
hate against everything we hold dear! 




THEY CALL THEMSELVES 
THE 'SONS OF HEAVEN'' 

^1 -yet here are some of 
the things they do: 

SELL their own daughters into 
gilded Geisha palaces! 

TREAT captive women with un- 
speakable barbarity! 

COMMIT cruel acts of war against 
even babes in arms! 

TORTURE helpless prisoners until 
they're ready to say or do 
ANYTHING! , 

DRIVE children to slave labor 
under the lash of hunger! 

-and more, and more, 
and MORE! 



From the Pages of Life of James R. Young's Amazing Book 



WITH 



IARGO • TOM NEAL • J. CARROL NAISH • ROBERT RYAN • GLORIA HOLDEN 

Directed by EDWARD DMYTRYK • Original Screen Play by EMMET LAVERY 



R K O 
RADIO 

W 



fi' 



IDE TUAT MAIlTC VHII MAn CMMIPU TH CIPUTf 



Monday, July 1.2, 1943 



iw 



DAILY 



# -V R€VI€UIS Of THE IKUI FILITIS £• .V 



"Crime Doctor" 

with Warner Baxter, Margaret Lindsay 
Columbia 66 Mins. 

RADIO FEATURE IS MADE INTO FAIR 
MELODRAMATIC ENTERTAINMENT; 
ACTING FILM'S MAIN ASSET. 

--. , Martin's radio feature has been 
br.^rt to the screen in routine fashion, 
although it has retained many of the ele- 
ments that gained it the attention of melo- 
drama fans on the air. 

The film owes a lot to its acting, which, 
in truth, is the best thing about the whole 
proceeding. While their acting leaves some- 
thing to be desired, Warner Baxter, Mar- 
garet Lindsay, John Litel, Ray Collins, Har- 
old Huber, Don Costello and Leon Ames, 
plus one or two others, do manage to give 
the film its primary interest. 

The story is the production's main weak- 
ness. It uses the old amnesia wheeze in 
a manner that is highly unbelievable. For 
the sake of convenience the authors of the 
screenplay, Graham Baker and Louis Lantz, 
working from an adaptation by Jerome Od- 
ium, stray far afield from the truth. Sev- 
eal developments in the story are quite fan- 
tastic. There is one consolation: the 
audiences for which the picture was devised 
are not likely to be concerned unduly with 
plot weaknesses. The melodramatic aspects 
are sufficient to enable one to gloss over 
many of the film's weaknesses. 

Baxter is a criminal who takes up medi- 
cine after an attack of amnesia. The fel- 
low becomes a noted and respected healer 
of sick minds. During his climb to success 
as a doctor he never slackens his effort to 
learn who he really is. When the men who 
were associated in crime with him revive 
his ugly past Baxter makes a clean breast 
of it. There follows a court trial at which 
he is placed on probation instead of being 
sent to jail. That supplies a happy ending 
for him and Margaret Lindsay, with whom 
he is in love. 

Litel, Huber and Costello enact the crim- 
inals out to get Baxter in the belief that the 
fellow is playing 'possum to keep from giv- 
ing up the proceeds of a bank robbery. 

Ralph Cohn produced and Michael Gordon 
directed with fair results. 

CAST: Warner Baxter, Margaret Lindsay, 
John Litel, Ray Collins, Harold Huber, Don 
Costello, Leon Ames, Constance Worth, 
Dorothy Tree, Vi Athens, Craig Woods, Al 
Shean. 

CREDITS: Producer, Ralph Cohn; Director, 
Michael Gordon; Screenplay, Graham Baker, 
Louis Lantz; Adaptation, Jerome Odium; 
Based on radio series by Max Marcin; 
Cameraman, James S. Brown, Jr.; Musical 
Score, Lee Zahler; Film Editor, D wight 
Caldwell. 

DIRECTION, Fair. PHOTOGRAPHY, 



Associates Fete Wang 

William Wang, who reports to the 
Navy today after 17 years' service 
with M-G-M here, was feted at a 
farewell luncheon at The Lohster at 
the week-end by his associates in the 
company's home-office publicity and 
advertising department. He received 
a leather traveling bag as a parting 
gift 



"Cowboy 
Commandos" 

with Ray Corrigan, Dennis Moore, 

Max Terhune 

Monogram 53 Mins. 

LATEST OF RANGE BUSTERS SERIES 
IS PACKED WITH ENOUGH ACTION TO 
GET A RISE OUT OF THE KIDS. 

"Cowboy Commandos," the latest of the 
Range Busters series, is a fair western in 
which the Ray Corrigan-Dennis Moore-Max 
Terhune team is put on the trail of a group 
of saboteurs conspiring to slow up produc- 
tion at a magnesite mine. After getting the 
lowdown on the gang the three heroes re- 
sort to commando methods to put the vil- 
lains out of commission. In the process they 
create plenty of exciting moments for the 
kids. 

The way Corrigan, Moore and Terhune go 
about putting the damper on the villains is 
scarcely to be taken seriously. It's meant 
strictly for the youngsters, who are hardly 
the ones to ask questions provided there is 
plenty of action to claim their attention. 
And this film gives them more than enough 
action to keep them happy. 

Terhune has the assignment of eaves- 
dropping on the villains and establishing 
their identity. He tackles the job with 
humor, adding to the entertainment value 
of the picture. Corrigan plays the sheriff 
who with Moore moves in on the villains 
once Terhune has done the spade work. 

George W. Weeks is listed as producer 
of the film, for which Elizabeth Beecher did 
the screenplay from a story by Clark Pay- 
low. S. Roy Luby's direction is con- 
cerned solely with the element of action. 

Our three heroes are assisted by Evelyn 
Finley, Johnny Bond (who contributes to 
the humorous content of the film) and 
Steve Clark. The villains are headed by Bud 
Buster, John Merton and Edna Bennett. 

CAST: Ray Corrigan, Dennis Moore, Max 
Terhune, Evelyn Finley, Johnny Bond, Bud 
Buster, John Merton, Edna Bennett, Steve 
Clark, Bud Osborne. 

OREDITS: Producer, George W. Weeks; 
Director, S. Roy Luby; Screenplay, Eliza- 
beth Beecher; Based on story by Clark 
Paylow; Film Editor, Roy Claire; Musical 
Score, Frank Sanucci; Cameraman, Edward 
Kull. 

DIRECTION, Fair. PHOTOGRAPHY, All 
Right. 



Two New Members of HVC 
Take Over Their Duties 



* SHORTS * 



E. J. Mettler Dead 

Miami, Fla. — Edward Joseph Mett- 
ler, 70, theatrical carpenter, died at 
his home. 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Two new members of 
the Hollywood Victory Committee 
staff have assumed their duties, 
with Frances Inglis filling the spot 
vacated by Paul Price as assistant to 
Chairman Kenneth Thomson, and 
Roy Mack assuming the post of 
liaison between HVC and Hollywood 
Writers Mobilization. 

Miss Inglis has been associated 
with the Myron Selznick agency for 
the past two and a half years. Mack, 
for 10 years producer and director 
of short subjects for Warner Bros., 
has just been released from the 
Army. 



"Screen Snapshots" 
(No. 10— Series 22) 
Columbia 10 Mins. 

One of Series' Best 
Lots of entertainment, cleverly 
purveyed, spikes the present issue. 
Mischa Auer, as emcee, enacts a 
dual role. In uniform in an Army 
camp he calls up his double (himself 
in Hollywood) to find out how every- 
thing is going in the film capital. 
The telephone conversation furnishes 
the discriptive narration for scene 
of various luminaries of the enter- 
tainment world at their personal 
chores. The sequence of Bill Thomp- 
son (radio's "Mr. Whimple") dodg- 
ing a summons demonstrates that 
star's versatility in characterizations. 
Ginny Simms, Gracie Fields, Mrs. Al 
Hall, Mrs. Edwin Knopf, Una O'Con- 
nor, and Rosita Moreno, are others 
who add zest to the footage. It's 
one of the best of the series to date. 



"Here Comes Mr. Zerk" 

Columbia 16 Mins. 

Fair Laugh-Getter 

Harry Langdon, out of traditional 



"white face," cavorts through this 
slapstick offering with spirit and 
abandon, getting about the most 
from a pretty good yarn penned by 
Jack White. Essentially it's for the 
folks who like their humor clear of 
any subtlety. Here and there are 
mirthful situations, but for the most 
part the footage is just so-so. Lang- 
don, engaged to wed, is wronged by a 
local newspaper which captions by 
mistake his photograph as that of a 
lunatic at large in the community. 
The complications are various, in- 
cluding of course the terror he evokes 
wherever he shows his person. Cli- 
max scene depicts the actual meet- 
ing of Langdon and the real lunatic. 
Jules White produced and directed. 
Stands going in for raucous reels 
should find it okay. 



Thomson Comes for NEIC Confab 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Kenneth Thomson, 
chairman of Hollywood Victory Com- 
mittee, trained out Friday for two- 
day session in New York, Wednes- 
day and Thursday, of the newly or- 
ganized National Entertainment In- 
dustry Council conference board. 




BATMAN 



daring young Robin, the Boy Wonder >,*. 

Based on the Batman Conic Magazine Feature appearing . j , '.'. 

in Detective Comics and Batman Magazines. A COlUTTIDia Chapter Play 



10 



Monday, July 12, 1943 



Clark to Meet Execs. 
On N. Y. Decree 



(Continued from Page 1) 

for July 22, and will attempt to visit 
other regional offices of the Anti- 
Trust division before then, as well 
as later. From Denver he will prob- 
ably go to Los Angeles, where he ex- 
pects to talk with film executives. 

A New York trip is also contem- 
plated, as well as later visits to all 
the regional offices of the division. 
Clark has already invited exhibitors 
to show up personally at these offices 
and bring their complaints to him. 

The reintroduction of the bill or- 
iginally bearing the name of former 
Sen. Matthew M. Neely of West Vir- 
ginia — to prohibit theater ownership 
by distributors or producers — was 
done without his knowledge, Clark 
said yesterday. Sen. Harley M. Kil- 
gore reintroduced the bill Monday 
and said he had done so through an 
agreement with the Department of 
Justice." Clark was not disturbed by 
Senator Kilgore's action, and said 
that although the Anti-Trust Divi- 
sion has not definitely decided upon 
its policy in the case, Kilgore's ac- 
tion "is not embarrassing to us." 



TO THE COLORS! 



• DECORATED • 

LT. PARKMAN W. DAVIS, AAF, formerly East- 
man Kodak, Rochester. Air Medal. 

— • — 

* COMMISSIONED * 

MA). MILTON SPERLING, USMC. 

LT. MELVIN A. ANDERSON, USA, formerly with 

20th-Fox los Angeles exchange. 
LT. DERR NEACLEY, USA, formerly with 20th- 

Fox Los Angeles branch. 



PROMOTED 

LT. SEYMOUR R. MAYER, Army Overseas Special 
Service Division, formerly New York district 
division manager for Loew's theater, to 
captain. 

CORP. JOHN SPRINGER, USAAF, former theater 
publicity director, Rochester, N. Y., to 
sergeant. 

— • — 

• ARMY * 

"HAP" HADLEY, JR., to West Point. 



D of A's War Food Play 
To Bow at the Crotona 



New York SPG Requests 
Quick Arbitration Action 



Preview Touhy Film Today 

Joliet, 111. — More than 500 law en- 
forcement officers of Illinois and ad- 
joining states will attend a preview 
screening of 20th-Fox's "Roger 
Touhy, Gangster," in Joliet prison, 
scene of the mobster's jailbreak to- 
day. Bryan Foy, producer, and Lois 
Andrews, feminine lead, will head 
the film group attending. 

Robert Montgomery, Hal Home's 
assistant, as well as Jack Goldstein 
and Jules Fields of Home's staff are 
here for the premiere. 



Crotona Theater, Skouras house in 
the Bronx, will be the site of the na- 
tion's first showing Wednesday night 
of the Department of Agriculture 
food play, "It's Up to You," in con- 
junction with community-sponsored 
war food shows and rallies featuring 
presentation of the stage attraction. 

According to Nick John Matsou- 
kas, director of the war effort de- 
partment of the Skouras Theaters 
Corp., the Crotona presentation will 
be followed by two more in the 
Bronx. One will be at the Ogden on 
Thursday; the other, at the Tuxedo 
on July 19. Both theaters are Skou- 
ras houses. Matsoukas is in charge 
of the New York area bookings of 
the food show. 

Each of the Bronx performances 
of "It's Up to You" will be preceded 
by a community-wide parade organ- 
ized by housewives. 

As a curtain raiser to the Bronx 
performances a 30-minute radio 
broadcast on the weekly Skouras 
Theaters war effort presentation, 
"This Is Our Cause," was staged 
yesterday over Station WINS, start- 
ing at 4:30 p.m. 



Film Close- Ups . . - 



By MARGARET T. RILEY 
Our complimentary copy of Film 
Daily's big, beautiful Yearbook has 
been at hand for some time, but we 
always run out of space too soon 
to set down a sampling of its won- 
ders. This is the sixth year we have 
received it and each time it gets 
better and more useful. 

Now that we are little more than 
an armchair critic — the gas taboo, 
no theatre near Boalsburg, and so 
many bugs on the beans and pota- 
toes — we appreciate more than ever 
the receipt of Film Daily and its 
annual volume full of all kinds of 
information about the industry. 

Aside from giving a complete 
report of the film industry's par- 
ticipation in the war effort (this 
takes pages and pages), the Year- 
book continues its usual sections 
listing all productions; records of 
players, directors, writers, camera- 
men; and reports on any phase of 
the film business you'd care to name. 

There are nearly 1000 theatres in 
Army camps in this country. . . . 
To the Shores of Tripoli was the 



Army box office favorite last year 
. . . all major companies provide 
16mm. size films for showing of 
their features in combat areas. . . . 
One of our favorite sections is 
the Historical Highlights of the 
Motion Picture Industry, which 
starts off with a notation dated 
1878 — the first known picture analy- 
sis of motion was dreamed up by 
Leland Stanford to prove his con- 
tention that a horse's four hoofs 
leave the ground at one time while 
running. The 1942 items recall the 
passing of John Barrymore, Carole 
Lombard, Edna May Oliver, and May 
Robson, among many others. 

Pennsylvania's nearly 2,000 film 
theatres, thanks to the 1941 Legis- 
lature, may now open Sundays by 
local option if in the referendum 
which may be' held every four years 
(instead of the former five) 20 per 
cent (five per cent before) of the 
highest vote cast for any candidate 
request it. 

Reprinted from 

The Centre Daily Times 

State College, Pa. 



The membership of the Screen 
Publicists Guild of New York has 
called upon five major film compa- 
nies and two circuits for speedy ac- 
tion on the recently agreed-upon ar- 
bitration in present contract nego- 
tiations, it was learned on Friday. 
The film companies are Universal, 
Columbia, Paramount, RKO Radio, 
M-G-M, the circuits being Loew's 
and RKO Service Corp. 

The guild members also have 
moved for immediate further meet- 
ings with United Artists and 20th- 
Fox, whose contracts with the SPG 
do not contain arbitration clauses, 
and for early reopening of negotia- 
tions with Warner Bros. The War- 
ner Bros, contract comes up for 
wage discussion next month. 

In telegrams to the five film com- 
panies and two circuits the guild 
charged that "three months have 
elapsed since these negotiations 
were initiated and very little prog- 
ress has been made." The member- 
ship of the SPG accused the com- 
panies with "stalling" on negotia- 
tions. 

Carl Rigrod of RKO Radio has 
been elected second vice-president of 
the SPG as successor to Lawrence 
H. Lipskin, who recently resigned. 



Para, to Bare First 
Block at Sales Meet 



Curfew Cities Enforce 
Juvenile Curfew Laws 



Akron, O. — Mayor George J. 
Harter did not veto a curfew or- 
dinance to keep children under 16 
off the streets after 11 p.m. and 
holding parents and guardians re- 
sponsible, but allowed it to become 
a law without his signature. 



Girard, O. — Curfew ordinance 
barring children under 17 from the 
streets after 10 p.m. has been ap- 
proved by City Council. The bill 
provides a penalty for parents whose 
children violate the measure. 



Conneaut, O. — City police are en- 
forcing a 10 p.m. curfew for all 
children under 16. 



St. Paris, O. — Village Council has 
passed an ordinance providing a 11 
p.m. curfew for youths under 16 
years of age. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Pierre, Thursday through Saturday. 
District managers and district ad- 
vertising reps, arrive Wednesday to 
attend the FWTBT world premiere 
at the Rivoli that night. 

Neil Agnew, general sales " .; i- 
ager, will preside at the three-day 
session, while other home office 
execs, will participate. First block 
of pix for next season will be an- 
nounced. In all probability, the par- 
ley will substitute for the traditional 
sales convention, it was learned. 

First session Thursday will be ad- 
dressed by Barney Balaban, Adolph 
Zukor, Agnew, Charles M. Reagan, 
and Robert M. Gillham, while B. G. 
DeSylva will address the afternoon 
session. 

Friday morning's progTam includes discus- 
sions by Oscar A. Morgan, Gillham. Stanley 
Shuford, Al Wilkie, publicity manager, and 
Alee Moss, exploitation manager, on adver- 
tising and publicity campaigns for the first 
block of pictures for the new season. Louis 
Phillips of the legal department, and Claude 
Lee, director of public relations, will also 
speak. 

Friday afternoon's session will be devoted 
to further discussions of product and sales 
plans by Agnew, Reagan, Hugh Owen, Eastern 
division manager, and George A. Smith, West- 
ern division manager. 

Moss will preside at a special session for 
the district advertising representatives at 
which advertising and exploitation plans 
will be discussed. 

Screenings of new product will be held 
tor the delegates Thursday and Friday night. 

Conference will wind up Saturday morn- 
ing with individual sessions of the district 
managers with the division heads. 

G. B. J. Frawley is in charge of arrange- 
ments. District managers who will be pres- 
ent are: 

William Erbb. Boston; M. S. Kusell, New 
York City; Harry Goldstein, Cleveland; E. W. 
Sweigert, Philadelphia: John Kirby, Atlanta; 
Allen Usher, Chicago; R. C. LiBeau, Kansas 
City; Hugh Braly, Denver, Colo.: Del Good- 
man, Los Angeles; J. J. Donohue. Dallas: 
Gordon Lightstone, Toronto. 

District advertising reps who will attend 
include: 

Arnold Van Leer, Boston; Ed J. Wall, 
Albany; Sid Mesibov, New York City; J. M. 
Joice, Cleveland; Charles C. Perry, Cincinnati; 
Wm. Brooker, Philadelphia; James Levine, 
Pittsburgh: E. G. Fitzgibbon, Chicago; M. D. 
Cohn, Kansas City; James Lundy, Denver; 
Ralph Ravenscroft, Los Angeles; W. C 
Lewellen, Dallas; James C. Furman, Atlanta, 
and Win Barron, Toronto. 

Home office distribution executives who 
will attend, in addition to those mentioned, 
are: C. J. Scollard, J. A. Walsh, F. A. Leroy, 
H. J. Lorber, A- J- Dunne and Jack Roper. 



Seidelman Names Daff 
Foreign Sales Supervisor 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Far-East supervisor, to post of for- 
eign sales supervisor, with head- 
quarters at the home office. 

Daff joined the company 23 years 
ago as booker in the Melbourne, Aus- 
tralia, branch. He has visited 55 
foreign countries in company's inter- 
ests, and was in charge of organiza- 
tion's offices in Japan before eleva- 
tion to Far-East supervisor post. 
Since the U. S. entered the war, he 
has limited his travels to India, Iran. 
Egypt, Turkey, Great Britain, Por- 
tugal, and South, East, Central and 
West Africa. He is said to be the 
only U. S. film executive to have 
visited Spain since the 1936 Civil 
War outbreak there. 




entlemen, take a bow! 



I 



.oday RKO salesmen from all over the country open 
their annual sales meeting at the Waldorf-Astoria. 

May I take this occasion to publicly express my sin- 
cere thanks and the genuine appreciation of our com- 
pany to the many thousand motion picture exhibitors 
from coast to coast who have made it possible for these 
salesmen to do the outstanding job they have turned 
in during the past nine months in selling our new and 
tremendously popular short subject series, "THIS IS 
AMERICA". 

When we started this series pretty much from scratch 
last Fall, these exhibitors, acting largely on faith, took 
on this brand new product with little more to guide 
them other than a firm faith in RKO and an abiding 
confidence in RKO's sales force. Today, as a result of 
this superb and coordinated effort of salesman and 
exhibitor, RKO can point with pride to a booking record 
on "THIS IS AMERICA" that is the envy of the industry. 

In behalf of RKO Radio Pictures I salute both the 
exhibitors and the salesmen who have made this 
possible. 



Gentlemen, take a bow! 



PRESIDENT 
RKO RADIO PICTURES, INC. 



"THIS IS AMERICA" is produced by Frederic Ullman, jr., 
and distributed by RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. 



12 



v% 



DAILY 



Monday, July 12, 1943 



Three-Point Program for WAC Parley Friday 



War Pix Setup, Next Loan 
Drive, NEIC Relationship 
To Receive Consideration 



(Continued from Page 1) 

commence with a luncheon, will also 
include, as result of invitations al- 
ready dispatched, representatives of 
all other WAC branches. 

In the invitations sent by Fran- 
cis S. Harmon, executive vice-chair- 
man, to the Co-ordinating Commit- 
tee at the request of Chairman 
George J. Schaefer, and to the The- 
aters Division Executive Committee 
pursuant to the call of S. H. Fabian, 
subjects to be brought to discussion 
included : 

(1) Ways and means for provid- 
ing an adequate program of war in- 
formation through the screen; (2) 
Ways and means of co-operating 
with the Treasury in the Third War 
Loan Drive, Sept. 9-20; (3) Rela- 
tionship of the WAC to the National 
Entertainment Industry Council. 
General WAC Forum 

In addition, it is expected that the 
floor will be thrown open for a gen- 
eral WAC forum and interchange of 
ideas. 

The Treasury Department, through 
Ted Gamble, has formally requested 
Fabian to ask that the industry par- 
ticipate in the Third War Loan to 
an aggressive, comprehensive extent. 
(Film Daily exclusively, July 8). 
The dozen-day campaign, in which 
the industry will participate but not 
spearhead, will have as its goal a 
figure somewhere around $30,000,- 
000,000. Kenneth Thomson, chair- 
man of the Hollywood Victory Com- 
mittee, and a member of the WAC 
Hollywood Division will, with WAC 
member John C. Flinn, be on hand. 
It is hoped that others from the 
West Coast will be present to dis- 
cuss potential co-operation. 

With the changed status of the 
Motion Picture Bureau of the Of- 
fice of War Information and the 
resignation of its chief, Lowell Mel- 
lett, the question of supplying the 
theaters with a continuing program 
of war information films is a per- 
tinent one. Harmon, who with Mel- 
lett, before Congress cut the OWI 
appropriation, fashioned the 52-week 
program of all gratis films which 
was to begin on Aug. 1, will present 
the situation as it stands today to 
the meeting. 

Schaefer to Present Aims 

Schaefer who has been tempor- 
ary chairman of the Continuations 
Committee of the NEIC, will present 
the aims and purposes of that or- 
ganization to the assembly. 

Members of the Co-ordinating- Committee 
expected to attend are: 

Walton C. Ament, Edward Arnold, Barney 



STORKS 



Pittsburgh — It is a six-pound 
daughter for Mr. and Mrs. Tony 
Stern, born at the West Penn Hos- 
pital here. 



Montreal "Y" Girls Stage Own City Council 

Meeting to Demand Films for Saves Over 12 

Montreal — This municipality had a new ruling body Friday when a hundred 
girls from Notre Dame De Grace YMCA set up a City Council meeting in the 
city's Council Chamber and demanded admission of children over 12 to film 
theaters. 

They were conducted by Marian Best, their group leader, who took the 
mayor's chair. A proposal was debated at some length "that the minimum age 
for admission to picture shows be reduced to 12." When the vote was taken 
the motion carried, the only dissenting votes being those of girls under 12 years 
of age. The visitors were afterwards escorted round the building by the city 
police. 



Safeguards Gains— Bernhard 

Post-War Major Task, WB Sales Meet Told 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Hotel Blackstone, with General 
Sales Manager Ben Kalmenson pre- 
siding. 

These gains, which Bernhard said 
were attained in large measure 
through close co-operation between 
the sales organization and exhibi- 
tors, were listed by him as follows: 
1. Extended runs; 2. higher 
quality product; 3. Substantial 
inventories of completed films 
before start of selling season; 

4. Increase in percentage deals; 

5. Expansion of film audience to 
all-time peak; 6. More equitable 
box-office prices. 

In the matter of extended runs, Bernhard, 
pioneer and consistent advocate of maximum 
playing time, said about 70 per cent of ex- 
hibitors now have been won over to the 
wisdom of this policy from a profit stand- 
point in addition to being a protective meas- 
ure under a war-time economy. 

Cites Film Quality Gains 

Great improvement in film quality has 
been made possible partly by the longer runs, 
encouraging- producers to concentrate more 
on top budget productions, he pointed out. 

Of distinct advantage to exhibitors, Bern- 
hard said, is the fact that whereas years 
ago a distributor started the new selling 
season with only six or eight definite stories 
and about 40 random titles, a company now 
opens its annual sales meeting with prac- 
tically a full year's quota of releases either 
completed or in various stages of production 
or preparation. 

Percentage deals, according to Bernhard, 
are on the increase and are bringing with 
them more aggressive showmanship on the 
part of exhibitor and distributor, to their 
mutual advantage. 

Audience I.Q. Higher Than Ever 

The picture-going audience today not only 
is the largest in history, and most consistent 
in regular attendance, Bernhard said, but its 
so called "intelligence level" has been raised 
several pegs, as shown by the widespread 
box-office success of scores of pictures once 
regarded as too highbrow for the masses. 

More equitable admission prices, already 
fairly well established in most of the impor- 
tant situations, will help to guarantee con- 
tinuance of quality product besides lifting 



the motion picture theater to the plane of 
dignity and respect it deserves as result of 
the great public service it renders, he de- 
clared. 

In order to insure preservation of these 
advancements and march on to even better 
things, Bernhard urged the Warner field 
force to be good ambassadors of their in- 
dustry as well as their company, to further 
the Warner "open-door policy" in every way 
possible and to maintain closer and more 
friendly relations than ever before with 
exhibitors. 

H. O. Execs. Go to Frisco 

The local regional was concluded Satur- 
day with a series of special group confer- 
ences on individual branch matters, and on 
Sunday the home office delegates left Chi- 
cago for San Francisco, where Kalmenson 
will conduct his third and final business con- 
ference starting Thursday. Westbound dele- 
gation includes Kalmenson, Arthur Sachson, 
Roy Haines, A. W. Schwalberg, Norman H. 
Moray, Howard Levinson and Albert S. How- 
son. 

Joseph Bernhard planed back to New York 
late Friday and Ed Hinehy and Mike Dolid 
left Saturday for New York. 

Friday morning's session wast a fast-mov- 
ing, three-hour affair, with preliminary talks 
by Bernhard and Kalmenson, after which 
Howson gave full details of completed pic- 
tures and list of story properties already set 
by Jack L. Warner for early production. 
James Coston, zone manager for Warner 
theaters, also spoke briefly on exhibition 
angles, with special comment on increasing 
success of extended runs. 

Friday afternoon wound up with a straight 
talk by Kalmenson on selling procedure. 
Concluding business sessions Saturday morn- 
ing devoted to group conferences with Kal- 
menson, Haines, Sachson, Schwalberg, Levin- 
son addressing the men. 



Three New WB Salesmen 
Presented by Kalmenson 

Chicago — Three new Warner 
salesmen were introduced by Ben 
Kalmenson at the regional meeting 
here. Frank Carter, former booker, 
was promoted to salesman in the 
Memphis branch, while Minneapolis 
has two newly appointed salesmen, 
Herb Blass and W. O. McFall. 



Balaban, Nate J. Blumberg, Oscar A. Doob, 
S. H. Fabian, Joseph H. Hazen, Edward L. 
Kuykendall, Abe Lastfogel, Mary C. MeCall, 
Jr., Abram F. Myers, Robert H. Poole, 
Martin J. Quigley, Philip Reisman, Herman 
Robbing, William F. Rodgers, Nicholas M. 
Schenck, Spyros P. Skouras, Kenneth Thom- 
son, Walter Vincent, R. B. Wilby, Nathan 
Yamins, Adolph Zukor. 

Theaters Division Executive Committee 
attendees will include: 

Joseph Bernhard, E. V. Richards, Arthur 
L. Mayer, E. L. Alperson, A. H. Blank, 
Harry Brandt, John H. Harris, E. L. Kuy- 
kendall, Sam E. Morris, Charles C. Mos- 



kowitz, R. J. O'Donnell, M. A. Rosenberg, 
Spyros Skouras, R. B. Wilby, Nathan Yamins, 
Leonard Goldenson, Ban Michalove. 

Invitations have been extended to the 
following exhibitor area chairmen: 

Lou R. Golding, R. B. Wilby, Sam Pin- 
anski, Al Bevan, Chas. Hayman, H. F. 
Kincey, John Balaban, Jack Kirsch, Jules 
Rubens, Ike Libson, Wm. Skirball, R. J. 
O'Donnell, Rick Ricketson, B. D. Cockrill, 
A. H. Blank, E. C. Beatty, Carl Buermele, 
Harry Katz, Marc Wolf, Elmer Rhoden, R. H. 
Poole, Chas. Skouras, M. A. Lightman, Har- 
old Fitzgerald, John Friedl, I. J. Hoffman, 



WAR SERVICE 

. . . on the Film Front 



Pittsburgh — The Exhibitors Servi</^^. 
has informed exhibitors that it will £ x'.x 
and pick up without charge films furnished 
gratis by the various distributing companies 
for the brass-copper-bronze benefit shows 
being held throughout the territory. 

. . ._ V. . .— 
West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Los Angeles — All first-run theaters are 
recruiting blood donors for the Red Cross, 
with two of the larger houses reporting 
over 1000 "enlistees" during the first two 
weeks. 

. . ._ V. . .— 
West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Total of 275 theaters in 
Southern California and Arizona have been 
running a silk and nylon salvage campaign 
at the request of the local WPB. Special 
matinees have been held and will continue 
until exhibitors believe they have "scraped 
the bottom" of this type of salvage. The 
WPB has already acknowledged the very 
satisfactory results. 



E. V. Richards, Sam Rinzler, Fred J. 
Schwartz, Harry Lowenstein, L. C. Griffith, 
Jos. Kinsky, Jay Emanuel, M. A. Silver, 
M. A. Rosenberg, Albert Finke. Robert 
White, Fred Wehrenberg, Harry Arthur, John 
Rugar, Tracy Barham, D. J. McNerney, Jos. 
Blumenfeld, Rotus Harvey, B. V. Sturdivant, 
Frank Newman, John J. Payette, W. J. 
Crockett, Frank A. Hornig. 



Industry-OWI Meeting 

In TV. Y. Probably Thursday 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — An industry meeting 
in New York with OWI Director El- 
mer Davis and Domestic Director 
E. Palmer Hoyt is expected to be 
called for late this week. Elmer 
Davis plans to be in New York Thurs- 
day, and that day, it is reported 
here, will likely be the day of the 
get-together but this has not defi- 
nitely been decided. Until this meet- 
ing, it is not likely that there will 
be any announcement regarding the 
OWI motion picture plans. It has 
not been decided whether a separate 
bureau will be maintained, or the 
work carried on directly under the 
heads of the domestic branch. 

Rumors that Leo Rosten, who has been 
with OWI in Washington for some time 
might assume direction of the agency's pic- 
ture activities were termed groundless by re- 
sponsible agency heads Friday. Rosten was 
not in town and could not therefore com- 
(Continued on Page 15) 



WEDDING BELLS 



V/est Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Marriage of Maria 
Montez and Jean Pierre Aumont is 
expected to take place here today. 



Buffalo — Josephine Wobrock, 20th 
Century Theater cashier, was mar- 
ried July 3 to Norman Fitzpatrick. 
They are honeymooning in Canada. 



, 



NOTICE! 



Starting August 10th, I will begin shooting "Dr. Paul 
Joseph Goebbels, His Life and Loves" because I am con- 
vinced, after a thorough examination of the subject matter 
and public interest in it, that there is definitely a vast 
market for such a powerful and unique story. 

It will NOT be a war picture. It will be an intimate, 
searching dramatization of the personal life of one of the 
most sinister, yet fascinating, scoundrels in world history. 
The main theme of the gripping story will revolve around 
his attempts to seduce the one girl who had the strength of 
character and courage to resist his mad desires. The 
entire story is based upon actual facts. The director will be 
Alfred Zeisler, who, as head producer and director at the 
UFA studios in Berlin, inadvertently came in personal 
contact with the Propaganda Minister and other high 
German officials. 

I assure you that 

"DR. PAUL JOSEPH GOEBBELS, 
HIS LIFE AND LOVES" 

will be designed as an outstanding boxoffice attraction 
and will be produced lavishly and knowingly. 

14J. R. Q*a*tk 



W. R. F. PRODUCTIONS 

GENERAL SERVICE STUDIOS, HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



14 



» 



DAILY 



Monday, July 12, 1943 



RKO Radio Executives Assemble for Sales Convention Today 





I 



NED E. DEPINET 



CHARLES KOERNER 



PHIL REISMAN 



s. barret Mccormick 



WALTER BRANSON 



NAT LEVY 



HARRY MICHALSON 



Odium Greets RKO 
Meeting Delegates 



(Continued from Page 1) 

in addition to Odium, will be Rich- 
ard C. Patterson, Jr., vice-chairman; 
N. Peter Rathvon, president of RKO; 
Charles W. Koerner, RKO Radio 
vice-president in charge of produc- 
tion; Phil Reisman, RKO Radio vice- 
president in charge of foreign dis- 
tribution; Gordon E. Youngman, 
RKO Radio vice-president and gen- 
eral counsel; Robert Mochrie, gen- 
eral sales manager; Walter E. Bran- 
son, Western division sales manager; 
Nat Levy, Eastern division sales 
manager; Leo M. Devaney, Canadian 
division sales manager; Harry 
Michalson, short subjects sales man- 
ager; Edward Alperson, general 
manager of RKO theaters; S. Bar- 
ret McCormick, director of advertis- 
ing and publicity; Perry Lieber, stu- 
dio publicity director; Samuel Gold- 
wyn, James Mulvey, Roy Disney, 



Ends First Year 

In 3 RKO Offices 

N. Peter Rathvon, president of 
RKO Corp., chairman of the Board 
of RKO Radio Pictures, Inc., and 
chairman o f 
the Board of 
Pa the News, 
Inc., is observ- 
ing, with the 
opening today 
of RKO Radio's 
twelfth annu- 
al sales meet- 
i n g at the 
Waldorf - As- 
toria Hotel, 
the comple- 
t i o n of his 
first year in 
these three 
offices. 

I dentif ied 
with RKO 




N. PETER RATHVON 



since 1939, Rathvon served for two 
years as a director and also as chair- 
man of the executive committee. In 
1941 he was elected vice-president 
of RKO, and a year ago he was 
elevated to his present three offices. 



and Frederic Ullman, Jr., president 
of Pathe News, Inc. 

A. A. Schubart, manager of ex- 
change operations, will call the roll 
of delegats which will be followed 
by general business on the current 
season's product and announcements 
of the winners in the recent Ned E. 
Depinet Sales Drive. 



This morning will be devoted to a 
preview of two new RKO Radio pro- 
ductions, "Behind the Rising Sun," 
and "The Sky's the Limit," at the 
Trans-Lux Theater. Following the 
screening the delegates will be hosted 
by the company at luncheon in the 
Waldorf- Astoria's Wedgewood Room. 



RKO SALES MEETING REGISTRANTS 



Registration roster for the RKO Radio 
sales convention shows the following 
names: 

ALBANY: Max Westebbe, branch manager; 
George Tucker, Harold J. Carlock, salesmen. 

ATLANTA: Hubert M. Lyons, branch 
manager: Frank W. Salley, Paul Harrison. 
R. C. Price, James D. Campbell, Byron S. 
Bryan, salesmen. 

BOSTON: Ross C. Cropper, branch man- 
ager; William H. Gardiner, Harry F. Gold- 
stein, Frank G. Ross, Carma L. DeVizia, 
Melville M. Ames, William J. Cuddy, sales- 
men. 

BUFFALO: Elmer Lux, branch manager; 
John G. Chinell, Norman L. Sper, Edwin J. 
Smith, Sr., salesmen. 

CHARLOTTE: Rovy F. Branon, branch 
manager; Fred E. Dyer, James W. Sims, 
R. M. Boovy, R. S. Mitchell, salesmen. 

CHICAGO: Sam Gorelick, branch manager; 
Harry Walders, Michael Kassel, Joe Cozzi, 
John J. Clark, Seymour Borde, Harry S. 
Lorch, salesmen. 

CINCINNATI: Stanley C. Jacques, branch 
manager; Al Sugarman, Joseph A. McKnight, 
Ross Williams, Jack Frisch, John G. Furrer, 
salesmen. 

CLEVELAND: Bernard G. Kranze, branch 
manager; Arthur Goldsmith, Robert R. Rich- 
ardson, Frank E. Belles, salesmen. 

DALLAS: Sol M. Sachs, branch manager; 
Clarence J. Wheeler, Clarence B. Wilson, 
Harold J. M alone, Lin Harrington, Francis 
W. Faris, salesmen. 

DENVER: Albert L. Kolitz, branch man- 
ager; Ed Loy, Thomas A. McMahon, Marvin 
Goldfarb, salesmen. 

DES MOINES: Lou Elman, branch man- 
ager; W. F. DeFrenne, Wm. B. Benjamin, 
Clyde A. Pratt, salesmen. 

DETROIT: Fred North, branch manager; 
Milton E. Cohen, Ed Lebby, Sydney D. Chap- 
man. Joe Hartman, salesmen. 

INDIANAPOLIS: Maurice E. Lefko, 
branch manager; Russell L. Brentlinger, 
Peter J. Fortune, Herman Black, salesmen. 

KANSAS CITY: James W. Lewis, branch 
manager; Earl L. Dyson, A. A. Renfro, 
L. O. Ringler, George W. Hinton, salesmen. 

LOS ANGELES: Harry C. Cohen, branch 
manager; Joseph Rubenstein, Jos. F. Samuels, 
Frank J. Schiendler, R. H. Lange, salesmen. 

MEMPHIS: Al M. Avery, branch manager; 
Grover Wray, Glenn Calvert, David Hunt, 
salesmen. 

MILWAUKEE: Art N. Schmitz, branch 
manager: Morris Anderson, Ed W. Spiers, 
Wm. J. Foley, salesmen. 

MINNEAPOLIS: C. J. Dressell, branch 
manager; Wm. C. Winters, Irving Gillman, 
M. A. Lipsner. Robert P. Ableson, W. Prass, 
W. F. Bjorkman, salesmen. 

NEW HAVEN: Barney Pitkin, branch 
manager; William Canelli, salesman. 



NEW ORLEANS: J. R. Lamantia, branch 
manager; Wm. Shiell, Jr., M. L. Stevens, 
C. Riley, salesmen. 

NEW YORK: Phil Hodes, E. T. Carroll, 
J. J. Dacey, Lou I. Kutinsky, Harry Zeitels, 
Charles Penser, salesmen. 

OKLAHOMA CITY: R. B. Williams, 
branch manager; Paul D. Fielding, C. A. 
Blakeley, D. Wm. Snider, Jr., salesmen. 

OMAHA: Karl G. Howe, branch manager; 
M. M. Rosenblatt, John W. Andrews, Mack 
P. Jolly, salesmen. 

PHILADELPHIA: Charles Zagrans, branch 
manager; Sam Lefko, Michael Shulman, J. J. 
McFadden, Jr., Ely J. Epstein, Jack Engel, 

PITTSBURGH : Herb H. Greenblatt, branch 
manager; I. T. Sweeney, David C. Silverman, 
Irving I. Frankel, Carl Peppercorn, J. 
Withers, salesmen. 

PORTLAND: Mark E. Cory, branch man- 
ager; Gene Engelman, George Jackson, sales- 
men. 

ST. LOUIS: Ray V. Nolan, branch man- 
ager; Tom Williamson, Henry Arends, Her- 
man Gorelick, Patrick F. Byrne, salesmen. 

SALT LAKE CITY: Gift Davison, branch 
manager; George H. Warren, Sam Appelman, 
Harold W. Evens, James B. Griffin, salesmen. 

SAN FRANCISCO : Newt P. Jacobs, branch 
manager; George R. Seaeh, Earl A. Stein, 
Charles J. Crowley, H. Bradley Fish, Tom 
H. Bailey, salesmen. 

SEATTLE: Ed A. Lamb, branch manager; 
Louis L. Goldsmith, Floyd Heninger, sales- 
men. 

SIOUX FALLS : Sherman W. Fitch, branch 
manager; James Ricketts, R. J. Helmerson, 
salesmen. 

WASHINGTON: Joe B. Brecheen, branch 
manager; Harry E. Kahn, E. W. Grover, 
Al. Folliard, O. Knox, salesmen. 

TORONTO: Mark Plottel, branch man- 
ager,; Meyer Nackimson, Jos. Bermack, sales- 
men. 

MONTREAL: H. F. Taylor, branch man- 
ager: H. B. Miller, S. H. Decker, salesmen. 

ST. JOHN: H. H. McArthur, branch 
manager. 

WINNIPEG: Jos. H. McPherson, branch 
manager; Robert Radis, salesman. 

CALARY: R. Doddridge, branch manager. 

VANCOUVER: Wm. Spencer Jones, branch 
manager. 

DIVISION MANAGER: Leo M. Devaney, 
Canada. 

DISTRICT MANAGERS: Charles Boasberg, 
Eastern Central; Ben Y. Cammack, South- 
western; Robert J. Folliard, Eastern; L. E. 
Goldhammer, Prairie: Leonard Gruenberg, 
Rocky Mountain; J. H. Maclrrtyre, Western; 
Jack Osserman, Midwestern; David Prince, 
Southeastern; Gus Schaefer, Northeastern-' 
R. S. Wolff, Metropolitan. 

STUDIO: Charles W. Koerner, executive 
vice-president in charge of production; Perry 



Lieber, studio publicity director; H. Adam- 
son. 

HOME OFFICE: N. Peter Rathvon. presi- 
dent Radio-Keith-Orpheum; Ned E. Depinet, 
president RKO Radio Pictures; Phil Reisman, 
vice-president, RKO Radio Pictures; Robert 
Mochrie, general sales manager; Walter E. 
Branson, western division sales manager; 
Nat Levy, eastern division sales manager; 
Harry J. Michalson, short subjects sales 
manager: William H. Clark, assistant treas- 
urer RKO: S. Barret McCormick, director of 
advertising and publicity; Gordon E. Young- 
man, vice-president and general counsel; J. 
Miller Walker, secretary; Garrett Van Wagner, 
comptroller. 

And the following: Al Adams, publicity: 
Leon J. Bamberger, sales promotion man- 
ager; Arthur M. Brilant, publicity: J. Emmet 
Cashman, head of playdate department; Wil- 
liam E. Dahler, assistant to eastern sales 
manager; Robert H. Dann, legal; Walter V. 
Derham, assistant treasurer; Frank Drumm, 
assistant to Nat Levy; John A. Farmer, 
office manager; Norman Freeman, assistant 
to Mr. Rathvon; Lou E. Gaudreau, assistant 
to S. Barret McCormick; Harry Gittleson, 
assistant to Walter Branson; Leon Goldberg, 
treasurer; Ben Grimm, advertising manager; 
David Goldman, Harold Hendee, research 
director; William Home, sales department; 
Sidney Kramer, manager print and negative 
department; Jack Level, editor of Flash; 
Clarence McGeary, sales department; Edward 
J. McGuire, legal department; Oliver R. 
McMahon, assistant treasurer; William J. 
MeShea, assistant manager of exchange 

(Continued on Page 15) 



Mochrie Passes RKO 
Sales Post Milestone 

Concurrent with RKO Radio's sales 
meeting now in three-day session at 
the Waldorf-Astoria, Robert Mochrie 
is celebrating 
his first year 
as general 
sales manager. 

It was just a 
year ago at 
RKO Radio's 
eleventh an- 
n u a I sales 




meeting held 
in the same 
place that 
President Ned 
E. Depinet an- 
nounced the 
promotion o f 
Mochrie to 
his p r e s e n t ROBERT MOCHRIE 
post. Mochrie's 

entry into the film business was via 
PDC. Subsequently, in turn, he joined 
Warners, United Artists and RKO 
Radio. In 1940 he was appointed 
RKO's Eastern division sales man- 
ager, after serving as Southern dis- 
trict manager. 



Monday, July 12, 1943 



15 



DAILY 



4,400 Feature Prints 
To Troops Overseas 



{Continued from Page 1) 

division screened current hit fea- 
tures for 953,000 troops in Hawaii. 
The Hawaii attendance figure, the 
only one available for public release 
at th is time, included 3,803 shows 
a ■ «^ the month. The most popular 
pk3?e so far among all those sent 
overseas, it was revealed, has been 
"Stage Door Canteen." The troop 
reaction wherever it has been shown 
has been "wonderful," the official 
said — adding that on a recent night 
1,450 men sat through a driving rain 
in an open-air theater in North Af- 
rica to see the picture. The next 
night 2,200 men saw it in the same 
spot, but it is presumed that the 
weather was better. 

Perhaps the next most popular film so 
far has been "Star Spangled Rhythm," and 

. musicals are far and away the most popular 
type film among- America's fig-hting- men 
abroad. Comedies come next. Although 26 
prints of new features are now supplied, 
the figure for several months past has been 
22. It started at eight and gradually worked 
up with the average supplied thus far by 
the industry estimated at 18, which would 
mean that approximately 245 separate new 
features have been printed for overseas 

, showing- to the troops at industry expense. 

In addition to these more than 350 shorts 
have been supplied on 16 mm. film by the 
industry with more than 6,400 prints shipped 
out by June 30. 

About 600 "transport films" have also 

! been supplied. These are revivals of the 
best of the old pix — usually specially re- 
printed — and are for showing- on troop trans- 
ports. They are used thus so that the men 
on the transports shall not have seen the 

; most recent pictures when they arrive at their 
destination. 

i Aside from the transport films, the new 
prints are shipped almost entirely by air. 
Some have doubtless been lost, but there is 
no accurate figure. It is believed that each 
print is shown a minimum of 40 to 50 times 
each. 

One official of the Special Service Division 
referred the writer to a recent dispatch from 
an INS war correspondent regarding the value 
of these pix for the morale of the fig-hting 
men overseas. "The next time some po- 
litical windbag in Washington shoots off his 
big mouth in Washington about the movie 
industry," he wrote, "ask him what the 
hell he's doing- for the boys who are fighting- 
and dying- out here just to keep his keaster 
out of a sling-. We know what Hollywood 
is doing." 

"And those sanctimonious patriots so swift 
to smear any man who happens to be an 
actor, let them take our word for it that 
an actor like Rooney or Bogart can do a 
million times as much g-ood mugging in front 
of a camera than he can behind a gran. . . 
There's something- tragically real about a 
re;:l soldier boy shedding- real tears over 
the make-believe soldier who is bleeding real 
tomato catsup." 

Significant of the hug-e volume of films 
new handled by the special service division 
is the fact that seven officers now work on 
controlling the flow of these prints whereas 
or.;:* one men working part-time handled it 
only a little over a year ago. 



"Heaven Can Wait" 
In Roxy Bow Aug, 4 

Twentieth Century-Fox's "Heaven 
Can Wait" is scheduled to open at 
the Roxy on Aug. 4 in what will be 
the film's first pre-release engage- 
ment. An extensive advance cam- 
paign is planned for the picture. 



RK0 SALES MEETING REGISTRANTS 



(Continued from Page 14) 



operations; Marty Monroe; Louis H. Miller, 
assistant to Walter Branson; Francis J. 
Mooney, sales department; Rutgers Neilson, 
publicity manager; Harry M. Pimstein, leg-al 
department; Michael G. Poller, assistant to 
Robert Mochrie: A. A. Schubart, manager 
of exchange operations; David L. Strumpf, 
art director; Terry Turner, head of field 
staff: Herbert E. Wappaus, head of contract 
department : Arthur Willi, eastern talent 
scout; Lewis Wolf, short subjects depart- 
ment; William Zimmerman, legal depart- 
ment. 

BOARD OP DIRECTORS: Floyd B. Odium, 
chairman; Richard C. Patterson, Jr., vice- 
chairman; Frederick L. Ehrman, L. Law- 
rence Green, L. Boyd Hatch, Georg-e H. 
Shaw, John M. Whitaker. 

FIELD MEN: Ronald Ames, Ralph Bang-- 
hart, Fred Calvin, David Cantor, Arthur 
Catlin, George Degnon, Fred Ford, Maurice 
Harris, Robert Hickey, Henry Howard, Eddie 
Johnson. T. B. McCormick, Al O'Caxnp, Don 
Prince, Robert Pryor, Harry Reiners, Al Selig, 
Gardner Wilson, Ted Wynn. 

RKO THEATERS: E. L. Alperson, J. B. 
Anderson, J. Becker, J. Brennan, John A. 
Cassidy, J. Conklin, A. Dawson, M. Edel- 
stein, H. R. Emde, W. England, M. Fellerman, 
J. Golden, Louis Goldberg-, Tom Gorman, 
E. Groth, J. Hearns, Fred Herkowitz, Nat 
Holt, W. Howard, W. E. Kernan, M. Kings- 



berg, J. Lamont, Louis Lazar, D. Levin, Ike 
Libson, V. Liguri, Ray Malone, C. B. McDon- 
ald, H. Mandel, H. Meakin, H. Mirisch, 
I. Morias, H. Moslek, R. Pantages, M. Polan, 
Clem Pope, S. Schwartz, H. Schreiber, R. 
Sherman, Mort Singer, E. Sniderman, H. 
Spencer, S. Tergan, L. E. Thompson, H. 
Unterfort, J. H. Walters, M. White. Al 
Zimbalist. 

FOREIGN HOME OFFICE: Robert K. 
Hawkinson, Michael Hoffay, Harry Ehrreich, 
Vladimir Lissim, Jack Kennedy. 

RKO PATHE: Walton Ament, Jay Bona- 
field, Dudley Hale, Frank Eaton, Frederic 
Ullman, Jr. 

WALT DISNEY PRODUCTIONS: Roy 
Disney, James Finey, Kay Kamen, Gunther 
Lessing, William Levy, W. Lowenberg, Leo 
Samuels, F. Waldheim. 

SAMUEL GOLDWYN PRODUCTIONS : 
James Mulvey, Lester Rawson, Mort Nathan- 
son, W. Heineman. B. Fish. 

NATIONAL SCREEN SERVICE: Jack 
Cohen, George Dembow, William Brenner, 
Harold Bennett, Walter Marcus, Paul Mooney, 
Herman Robbins, Henry Reiner, Jack Levy, 
Al. Stefanis, Vincent Trotta, Don Velde, 
Mel Gold. 

L. Hyman, representing- Sol Lesser, and 
Seymour Poe. 

Edward Golden, M. H. Aylesworth, Gus 
Eyssell, Frank Buck, Jack Pegler. 



Industry-OWI Meeting in 
N. Y. Probably Thursday 

(Continued from Page 12') 
ment on his reported desire to succeed Mel- 
lett as industry contact. Davis announced 
Mellett's resignation Friday as chief of the 
Motion Picture Bureau effective July 15. 
"It was," said Davis, "due to budget reduc- 
tions made by CongTess in appropriations 
for the domestic motion picture activities of 
OWT, which virtually eliminated all of the 
activities of the bureau as presently con- 
stituted." 

As to future activities in the industry's 
field, Davis said: "Our funds will not permit 
any production of motion pictures by OWI 
for domestic use. We will, however, con- 
tinue to discharge our responsibilities for 
the co-ordination of Government films and for 
liaison between the Government and the 
motion picture industry. We are indebted 
to Mr. Mellett for the establishment of cor- 
dial and satisfactory relations with the in- 
dustry which we hope may continue. 

"Within a week or 10 days Palmer Hoyt. 
director of domestic operations, and I hope 
to sit down with the heads of the motion 
picture companies and discuss plans for our 
continued co-operation." 



More Calif. Towns to Get 
Theater Defense Bureaus 



(Continued from Page 1) 

ency, exhibitor execs, of local Bureau 
are talking similar organizations for 
various incorporated cities in South- 
ern California. 

Currently in process of formation 
is a Santa Monica Theater Defense 
Bureau. Beverly Hills already has 
established such a bureau, and simi- 
lar setups are contemplated for 
Huntington Park, Inglewood and 
Glendale. The local bureau has 
put a majority of theaters in good 
war-time shape, with only 70 com- 
ing under the recalcitrant classifi- 
cation. A survey indicates that steps 
might be necessary to bring these 
70 into line. 

Inspections of all theaters are 
made monthly by a staff of volun- 
teer zone inspectors and their re- 
ports are relayed to the City De- 
fense Council and fire department. 



Samson Named to Top 
Spot in Dom. by 20th-Fox 

(Continued from Page 1) 

promoted to General Manager of 
20th Century-Fox Corp., Ltd., with 
headquarters in Toronto, replacing 
J. P. O'Loghlin, compelled to retire 
because of illness. Samson leaves 
for his new post within a few weeks. 
Over 200 film distribution men and 
exhibitors are expected at a testi- 
monial dinner for Samson next Mon- 
day in the Hotel Statler. Phil Fox, 
Columbia branch manager, is 
chairman. 



Dominion Gov't Silent 
On Status of "Moscow' 



Ottawa — No comment was forth- 
coming at the week-end from the Of- 
fice of External Affairs in the Do- 
minion Government regarding the 
failure of "Mission to Moscow" to 
have its advertised premiere at To- 
ronto Friday although it was ad- 
mitted two officials of the Depart- 
ment had attended a screening of 
the Warner picture for the purpose 
of submitting report on the theme 
for consideration of the Govern- 
ment. It is understood opening of 
the picture in Canada has been twice 
held up in the past month and ru- 
mor prevails objection has been 
raised from certain quarters, said 
to be French Canadian groups. 



IN NEW POSTS 



LAWRENCE WILTROUT, manager, Soisson The- 
ater, Connellsville, Pa. 

BOB SIECEL, chief of service, RKO Palace, Chi- 
cago. 

WALLACE BATTISTON, booker, Paramount ex- 
change, Pittsburgh. 






BIG PICTURE 




The star all America 
. loves in his newest and 

1 1 greatest hit. Packed with 
| typical Rogers action, 
|H romance and melodies- 

Of 

1&& 



SHEILA RYAN 
BARTON MacLANEj 
HARRV SHANNOI 
PAT BRADV 
ARUNE JUDGE 

and 
BOB NOUN 

and 
THE SONS OF 
THE PIONEERS 



JOSEPH KANE 

Director 

Original Screen Play 

by Winston Miller 

Associate Producei 

HARRV CREV 






It's a 

REPUBLIC PICTURE 



M 



EYE 



stopper!' 

* .. ^*u e \r homes.- r Postei 



■. ^ W 9 1 ^^ S Powers oway *- 

fe 1 fc ^ , , n lk to their homes.-!' pos , ers 

■P " u n asYOO''"» ia,St,,e LL>*s.m hommers ot em to 

U St«H over Y- *- ^ seteen h ^ - om the yery 4^*- ^ ^ t ^ 

-* * e nex ::;^t...yo-": bb i- ¥ ^ot ^^jr" 



m arquee . . . Y° ts yo o less . . W 

What Adverti»«9 



teassss- 






Shangri-La 
War Stamp 

Drive! 



K*mm 

STANDARD & 



TY ACCESSORIES • TRAILER 



M p P I) A INC 

21! W 44TH ST 
NYC 



B£SSS»« 



Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 




The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



84, NO. 8 



NEW YORK. TUESDAY, JULY 13. 1943 



TEN CENTS 



WPB APPROVES BUILDING 100 PROJECTORS 

la.-Neb. Indie Unit Backs Allied on Divorcement 



President Leo F. Wolcott 
Advises Attorney General 
Of Attitude, Asks Action 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — The first unaffiliated 
exhibitor organization to go all-out 
for divorcement, the Allied-Indepen- 
dent Theater Owners of Iowa-Neb- 
raska, Inc., has advised the Attorney 
General that it "fully concurs with 
and lends its unanimous support to 
the report of the general counsel to 
the Allied States Association board 
of directors dated April 30 and the 
resolution adopted by the board on 

(Continued on Page 20) 

Republic Increasing 
Musicals Production 



President James R. Grainger will 
conduct the first of Republic's cur- 
rent series of regular quarterly sales 
meetings today and tomorrow at the 
New York Athletic Club. In at- 
tendance will foe Maxwell Gillis and 
Sam Seplowin, Eastern and Central 
district sales managers, and ex- 
change representatives from those 
districts. 

Program schedules discussion of 

(Continued on Page 12) 



Scully, Depinet Reiterate 
Policies on Adjustments 



Columbus, O. — William A. Scully, 
Universale sales chief, defining the 
company's policy on adjustments, in 
a let'.er to Pete J. Wood, secretary 
of the ITO of Ohio, writes: 

"We can truthfully say that in 

(Continued on Page 15) 



Ascap's $1,260,000 
Best Since >40 Split 

Business is good for composers, too. 

The largest royalty distribution 
made in any one quarter since 1940, 
Ascap yesterday split a $1,260,000 
melon for the second quarter of 
1943, ending June 30, among its 
membership and associated societies. 



All Tradeshowings of "Heaven Can Wait" to Be 
Before Paying Preview Audiences at Exchanges 

All tradeshowings of "Heaven Can Wait" will be held in combination with 
previews of the film in all of 20th-Fox's exchange centers under an innovation 
announced yesterday by Tom J. Connors, the company's distribution boss. The 
screenings, to which exhibitors will be admitted free, will be before regular 
theater audiences. This is said to mark the first time in the industry's history 
that this method of tradeshowing a film will have been used on a national basis. 
The step was taken by Connors on the theory that exhibitors would be able to 
benefit from the reaction of paying customers. 

The tradeshowings-previews are now being arranged, with dates to be an- 
nounced later. 



Cities Bid 
Address by Coe 



.Solid click of public relations pol- 
icy inaugurated by the MPPDA un- 
der the direction of Charles Fran- 
cis "Socker" Coe, vice-president and 
general counsel, is instanced by the 
fact that Coe returned yesterday 
from a transcontinental swing to 
find invitations from a score of cities 
piled up on his executive desk. 

In all probability, one will foe ac- 

(Continued on Page 15) 

Appeal Board Refuses 
To Reopen Fried Case 

A motion to reopen the Riant The- 
ater, Conshohocken, Pa., clearance 
award has been denied by the motion 
picture appeal board. Original com- 
plaint was filed by Harry Fried, op- 
erator of the Riant, against the five 
consenting companies and the Norris 
Amusement Co., operator of the Nor- 

(Continued on Page 21) 



Depinet to Reveal 
RKO Program Today 



Ned E. Depinet, RKO Radio prexy, 
will raise the curtain on the com- 
pany's 1943-44 product lineup at 
this afternoon's fousiness session of 
the sales meeting which enters its 
second day at the Waldorf-Astoria 
today. 

Session is scheduled to start at 
2 p.m. in the hotel's Wedgewood 
Room, immediately following lunch- 

(Continued on Page IS) 



Dom. Youths to Register 
For War Work by July 24 

Ottawa — A fourth manpower draft 
order announced by Labor Minister 
Humphrey Mitchell requires all stu- 
dents 16 to 18 years of age holding 
Summer jobs in theaters or film ex- 
changes to register before July 24 
for transfer to essential war occu- 
ipations or farming, whether they 

(Continued on Page 15) 



Tax Deduction "Takes" Good 

FILM DAILY Survey Shows No B. O. Decline 



Century Circuit Wins Two 
Motions in Empire Fight 

Century Circuit has been victor- 
ious on two motions in its fight 
against Empire State Motion Pic- 
ture Operators Union to prevent con- 
solidation of the union with the 
(Continued on Page 12) 



Impact on the country's box-of- 
fices of the first pay-as-you-go- Fed- 
eral income tax deductions from the 
pay envelopes of America's work- 
ers was negligible, a nation-wide 
check-up by The Film Daily indi- 
cated last night. 

While exhibitors were of the im- 
pression that they were by no means 

(Continued on Page 21) 



Will Be Released Only 
To Theaters That Have 
Lost Machines in Fires 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Approval has been 
given by WPB for the building of 
100 projectors for theaters to re- 
place burnt-out obsolete units for 
which necessary repair parts are not 
available. These machines will be 
started during the present quarter, 
but it is not likely that any of them 
will be available before the end of 
the year. 

A. G. Smith of the WPB Service 

(Continued on Page 4) 

OWI Wants Kastner 
For Overseas Pix Job 



Republic Abolishes Its 
Studio Publicity Dept. 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Republic studio pub- 
licity department has been abolished 
with Walter Compton, head of the 

(Continued on Page 4) 



OWI is reported desirous of ob- 
taining the services of Lacy Kastner, 
assistant to Joseph McConville, Co- 
lumbia's foreign distribution chief, 
for an overseas film distribution as- 
signment. 

Understood that the OWI plan calls 

(Continued on Page 12) 



Canada's War-Time 
Info. Board Expanding 

Ottawa— While the OWI in the 
U. S. is shrinking through Congres- 
sional action, the Wartime Informa- 
tion Board in Canada, headed by 
John Grierson, is expanding. Ap- 
pointment of A. D. Dunton, news- 
paper editor, as assistant general 
manager and G. C. Andrew, of Tor- 
onto, to the office of board secre- 
tary, is announced. Information as 
to salaries and expenses of Grierson's 
Bureau recently were refused to the 
Canadian Parliament as not being in 
the public interest. 






TOE 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 13, 1943 




Vol. 84, No. 8 Tues., July 13, 1943 


10 Cents 


JOHN W. AUCOATE 


Publisher 


DONALD M. MERSEREAU : General 


Manager 



CHESTER B. BAHN 



Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address: 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco-Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



FINANCIAL 



(Monday, July 12) 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat }6% 16y 2 163/ 4 

Col. Piers, vtc. (21/2%) 18 17% 18 + % 

Columbia Picts. pfd 

Con. Fm. Ind 3 3 3 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd 

East. Kodak 165Vi 165 165 

do pfd 180 180 180 

Cen. Prec. Eq 223/ 4 22y 2 22% -f- Va 

Loew's, Inc 61% 61% 61% 

Paramount 30 293/ 4 30 + % 

RKO 95/ 8 9% 91/2 + Vs 

RKO $6 pfd 971/2 97 971/2 + 1 

20th Century-Fox ... 23 1/4 23 1/4 23% + U/4 
20th Century-Fox pfd. 33 V 8 32% 33 Vs + V* 

Univ. Pict. pfd 

Warner Bros 15Vs 15 15'/ 8 

do pfd 

89 13-32 893/ 8 89 13-32+1-32 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Para. B'way 3s55. . . 77y 2 77i/ 2 77l/ 2 

Para. Picts. deb. 4s56 

Warner Bros.' dbs. 6s48 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Monogram Picts. . . . 3S/ 8 3 5 / 8 3% 

Radio-Keith cvs 2 13/4 2 

Sonofone Corp 33,4 31/2 3'/i — Vs 

Technicolor 13'/g 12% 13Vs + % 

Trans-Lux 

Universal Corp. vtc 

Universal Picts 19 19 19 + % 

N. Y. OVER-THE-COUNTER SECURITIES 

Bid Asked 
Roxy Thea. Bldg. 4s 1st '57 773/ 8 79y 8 



pniinrn 

[film storage CORPjl 
ll If II V k ll 



1600 B'WAY, N. Y. C. - CIRCLE 6-0081-2-3-4 



HIM rXCH&MM DUTltlWTKM SttVICt 



G 



Levey Lining Up Nine 
Ace Writers for Staff 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Jules Levey, embark- 
ing upon the most ambitious pro- 
duction program in his career, is 
lining up nine topflight writers to 
do the scripts for the five big-budget 
pictures he will produce for United 
Artists release. Typical of the high- 
calibre names Levey is contracting 
is Howard Estabrook, who adapted 
"The Human Comedy." Estabrook 
will adapt and write "The Hairy 
Ape," which Levey will produce from 
the Eugene O'Neill play by the same 
name. 

Levey returns to production after 
devoting six months to confidential 
work for the Government in connec- 
tion with the war effort. While tour- 
ing the country in this connection, 
he talked to scores of leading ex- 
hibitors and exchange men regard- 
ing current box-office needs and this 
information will guide him in map- 
ping his program for United Ar- 
tists. 



Expect Film on Tunisian 
Campaign at End of July 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Completion of the 
film story of the Tunisian campaign, 
which has been under preparation by 
Colonels Frank Capra and William 
O. Keighley for several months now, 
is expected by the end of July, it 
was revealed yesterday by Army 
officials. Work has been going on in 
Astoria and Hollywood with thou- 
sands of feet of film on the North 
African action being studied. 

The completed film is expected to 
run about an hour, in black and 
white. It is being made for Army 
showing, but Army pressure for pub- 
lic showing is not at all unlikely — 
especially now that Lowell Mellett, 
retiring OWI pix chief and industry 
champion against odd-sized Army 
films, will be out of the picture. 



Carr, Executive Producer 
Of Monogram Productions 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Monogram Produc- 
tions, Inc., subsidiary of Monogram 
Pictures Corp., will again become 
active in production, W. Ray John- 
ston, president, announces. Unit, 
inactive for the past three years, 
will have Trem Carr as executive 
producer with Scott R. Dunlap and 
Lindsley Parsons producing. 

Monogram Productions' schedule 
includes "Lady, Let's Dance," star- 
ring Belita; Jackie Cooper in 
Ground Crew," "College Sweet- 
heart," "Black Beauty," "Trail of 
the Yukon," "Sweetheart of Sigma 
Chi" and "Hot Rhythm." 



Goldstein Back in Office 

Cleveland — Harry Goldstein, Par- 
amount district manager, has suf- 
ficiently recovered from a six months' 
illness to be able to spend the after- 
noons in his office. 



Kalmenson Again 

Roosts Harry Seed 

Promotion of Harry Seed, former 
New York Metropolitan district man- 
ager for Warners, to the post of 
Midwest Dis- 
trict Manager, 
was announced 
yesterday by 
Ben Kalmen- 
son, general 
sales manager, 
who arrives in 
San Francisco 
from Chicago 
today for the 
company's 
third regional 
sales meeting. 
A successor to 
Seed in New 
York will be 
named in a 
few days. 

Seed assumes his new duties im- 
mediately, supervising the Chicago, 
Detroit, Milwaukee and Minneapolis 
territories which are part of the di- 
vision under Roy Haines, Southern 
and Western division sales manager. 
It marks the second promotion this 
year for Seed. Only a few months 
ago he was advanced to the Metro- 
politan post from the Central dis- 
trict. 




HARRY SEED 



Hanson Starts Advertising 
Trade War on Newsreels 



Toronto — Oscar Hanson, president 
of Pioneer Films, is advertising in 
newspapers direct to theatergoers 
to use coupons asking exhibitors to 
book his Associated British News, 
imported from England for weekly 
release starting July 22. It is the 
first time in Canada any exchange 
has used newspaper displays to sell 
product to the public. 

Empire Universal Films has re- 
taliated with a trade announcement 
it already is releasing the British- 
Canadian Topical Weekly, and a trade 
war over newsreel rivalry has de- 
veloped. 



Watson Heads Sponsors 
for Premiere of "Army" 

Thomas J. Watson, president of 
the International Business Machines 
Corp. has accepted the chairmanship 
of the committee that will sponsor 
the world premiere of the screen 
version of Irving Berlin's "This Is 
The Army" for Army Emergency 
Relief at the Hollywood Theater, 
July 28. 



Mrs. Jack Laughlin Dead 

Detroit — Mrs. Esther A. Laugh- 
lin, wife of Jack Laughlin, former 
assistant manager of the Cass The- 
ater, is dead. Her husband and one 
son survive. 



Blackout for Indianapolis 

Indianapolis — Indianapolis will 
have a taste of a 35-minute blackout 
this week, sometime between the 
hours of 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. 



C0MIIIG and G0IDG 



CHARLES FRANCIS "SOCKER" COE has re- 
turned from the Coast. 

PAUL LAZARUS, JR., UA ad-publicity chief, 
leaves for the Coast Friday. 

CLAYTON LYNCH, Metro's L. A. branch man- 
ager, is in New York. 

JACK MAHLER, M-G-M talent scout, is in 
Louisville, Ky., from New York. 

F. E. "TED" O'SHEA, EDDIE AARON S* 
HAROLD POSTMAN returned to New York K.. .. - 
day from Cincinnati. 

CHARLES D. PRUTZMAN is off for Universal 
City tomorrow. MRS. PRUTZMAN will accompany 
him. 

HARRY GOLDBERC, director of advertising 
and publicity for Warner Theaters, left yester- 
day for Philadelphia and departs for Cleveland 
in connection with plans for the local pre- 
mieres of Irving Berlin's "This is the Army." 

JOHN A. BACHMAN, president of the Char- 
lotte Variety club and manager of Warners' ex- 
change in Charlotte, with three of his salesmen, 
HAROLD JORDAN, H. KEETER, and DEAN 
HOUSE, return today from Chicago. 

TOM DUN PHY of the Majestic, Bridgeport, 
Conn., is on sick leave in Maine. 

JOAN DUPEE, of the Vitagraph, New Haven, 
is vacationing on a ranch at Cinnabar in Peek- 
skill. 

ARTHUR DE BRA of the MPPDA returns today 
from the Coast via a Syracuse, Ind., stopover. 

AL SHERMAN, publicity consultant to the 
film and photo division of the Royal Norwegian 
Information Service of the Royal Norwegian 
Embassy in Washington, is in town. 

JAMES JOVANEY, general manager of the 
Globe Film Co. of Chicago, has arrived in the 
city for a week's stay to close pending deals 
on the company's newest attraction, "The Power 
of God." 

ALFRED DE LIACRE, JR., the Broadway pro- 
ducer, has gone to Hollywood. 

LOWELL GILMORE, actor recently signed to a 
contract by RKO Radio, has left for Hollywood 
for his first assignment. 

JOSEPH H. MOSKOWITZ, Eastern representa- 
tive of the 20th-Fox studios, accompanied by 
BERTRAM BLOCH, Eastern story editor, leave 
the end of this week for studio conferences. 

NORMAN FERCUSON, director of Walt Dis- 
ney's South American unit, is in Mexico City 
on a talent hunt. He is accompanied by HOMER 
BRICHTMAN and DAN KEEFE. 

FELIX JACKSON here to attend opening 
of "Her's to Hold," leaves for the Coast Friday. 

MRS. KEN GOLDSMITH and her four children 
are en route from the Coast with the remains 
of her late husband. He will be buried in New 
York. 

J. D. KENDIS will leave Hollywood July 23 
for a swing around the exchange centers to sell 
his new Continental picture, "Teen Age." 




Sidney Blackmer Carl E. Milliken 

Cornelius Keefe 




i& 



'A*. 



U V 



;C V 






£ m *» 




u 



^WvW £ko*6fc«« *%9%ph. *~JL \trOUH. YO-*Xa£**** *~C 



Mfc*^ -^.^mflBa^. 



CHARLES COBURN & T £ l SEl^?^«b 1 J EDMUND GOULDING 



DAME MAY WHITTY 



Directed by 
Keep Selling The "Shangri La" Stamp Drive! 




Screen Ploy by Kathryn Scolo • Ffom the Novel 

and Ploy by Margaret Kennedy and Basil Dean 

Music by-Erich Wolfgang Kotngold 



- - - M 






Tuesday, July 13, 1943 



Approves Building 
100 Film Projectors 



{Continued from Page 1) 

Equipment Division, which has abso- 
lute authority over who gets these 
machines, intends to be extremely 
tough in letting them out. Getting 
approval for them, when such things 
as typewriters and laundry machines 
simply cannot be built for civilian 
use is a feather in the cap of the 
industry, since the authorities who 
approved the manufacture of them 
must have been firmly convinced of 
the value of the war job done by the 
industry. That they will approve 
the manufacture of more, however, 
is extremely unlikely, and the ser- 
vice equipment division will take 
great pains to make certain that the 
equipment goes to only those thea- 
ters where fires have burnt out the 
booths or where old machines are 
in such bad shape that repair is es- 
sential and repair parts not avail- 
able. 

The orders for these machines as 
well as for 50 sound systems, 100 
lamps and 100 rectifiers, have been 
distributed among the manufactu- 
rers in proportion to the number of 
their products now in use by the- 
aters. These will be the first lot of 
such equipment for civilian use to 
be made in about a year and a half. 

An industry meeting will be held 
here Friday to discuss the possi- 
bility of making some new 16 mm. 
projectors for use by Government 
agencies, USO, etc., it was revealed 
yesterday by Harold Hopper, head 
of the motion picture section of 
WPB's Consumers Durable Goods 
Division. These will be entirely for 
war-related Government use how- 



Newspaper Contest In 
Cleveland on Way Out 

Cleveland — Local newspapers, it 
is reported, are cutting down on 
theater-newspaper co-operative ex- 
ploitation contests and it is further 
rumored that soon all such contests 
will be taboo here. This type of ex- 
ploitation has been extensively used 
by all Cleveland houses. 



WEDDING BELLS 



Roger Conant Clement, associated 
with Paramount legal department 
handling foreign matters, and Esther 
Augusta Riley were married last 
Friday at the Church of the Trans- 
figuration. 

Lake Arrowhead — Janet Blair and 
Sgt. Louis Bush, musical arranger 
with the Air Corps Band at Santa 
Ana, were married at the home of 
Frank Vincent yesterday. 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Beverly Hills — Maria Montez and 
Joel Pierre Aumont will be married 
tonight. 




T V V 

It Happened Last Night. . . . 

• • • SINCE showmen are businessmen who operate theaters 
primarily ior profit (the balance of the general motive being to gratify 
their professional desire or hobby). Phil M. feels that this column should 
stress the trade angle of last night's brilliant get-together in the Waldorf- 
Astoria, engineered by a triumvirate comprising Walt Disney, Albert D. 

Lasker and Hostess Elsa Maxwell Close to 1.000 people, elite of the 

Fourth Estate, Society, the Armed Forces, Trade Unions, Public Life, and 
Screen. Stage and Radio, were present for a buffet supper and, more 
importantly, to witness a private, pre-release showing of Mister Disney's 
celluloid translation of "Victory Through Air Power," authored by Major 

Alexander P. de Seversky, who was the function's guest of honor 

So, if Miss Maxwell will pardon our "talking shop." and leaving the 
glamour to Society Editors, we would like to tell the Gentlemen of the 

Exhibition Field a few things of consequence to their pocketbooks 

Here goes: 

T T ▼ 

• • • FIRST off, you, Mister Exhib., are hereby assured that 
"Victory Through Air Power" is a glorious attraction,— magnetic and re- 
vealing in content; stirring in its treatment and timeliness; rich in its 
promise of Victory's attainment; and potently geared to swell theater 

coffers of every size and type of stand .One can raise an audible 

prayer of thanksgiving for the medium of animation, for Technicolor, 

and the unrivalled genius of Walt Disney It is an unbeatable 

combination wherewith to picturize the vital concepts of Major de 

Seversky on the subject of air power So much for the picture 

Now, and secondly, you, Mr. Exhib., have rarely if ever been offered 

a film of such multiple merit Phil M. happens to know, as he 

writes this, that tremendous interest in the picture is rife among heads 

of leading circuits, regardless of who owns them He also knows 

that their determination to play the new Disney opus spiings from 

two motives, namely, the Patriotic and the Pecuniary "Victory 

Through Air Power" will spur not only the war effort and hasten the 
end of the Axis, but it is one of those rare cinematic properties that 
will, at the same time, fill the old till No wonder that it has al- 
ready lured to it such powerful sponsorship among showmen 

▼ TV 
THIRDLY, Mr. Exhib., you have rarely, if ever in these war 
days, been offered a picture commanding such a huge ready-made audi- 
ence The promotional campaign, launched by UA's Paul Lazarus, 

Jr., in the interests of the. distributor, and David "Skip" Weshner. in the 
interests of the producer, (and ALL in the interests of the exhibitor), is a 

beauty The great news services are giving the pic a terrific "play," 

as are the nation's mags, radio, and commercial firms, chiefly the aero- 
nautical industry Among the myriad send-offs are via AP, UP, INS, 

King Features and other syndicates, Redbook, Time, Ladies Home Journal, 
Liberty. Look. The New York Times Magazine Section, Parade, major 
radio networks (110 spots at least!), Wright Aeronautical (with ad tie- 
ups in some 40 aviation mags), the Aluminum Co. of America (via maps), 
Lockheed (in 60 national mags with 70,000,000 circulation), Bendix (via 
co-op newspaper campaign), etc., etc Defense factories are plan- 
ning to sell in excess of 1,000,000 admissions to their employes 

This all adds up to exploitation put into practical dollars We wish 

we had room to tell you more Well, thanks Elsa, Walt and Al for 

your hospitality last night, but here we wanted to remember Mr. Ex- 
hibitor, and have them — 

AVENGE PEARL HARBOR! 



IN NEW POSTS 



•HERMAN EDWARDS, vice-president, American 
Ticket Corp., Chicago. 

ROBERT BEERY, city manager, Gregory Theaters, 
Vincennes, ind. 

HERMAN KAL, RKO Grand, Chicago. 

GEORGE LEFKO, sales manager, Warners, Chi- 
cago. 

WARD PENNINGTON, salesman, Paramount, 
Portland. 

MAX HADFIELD, booker, Paramount, Seaf 

JOHN KENT, salesman, Paramount, Seattle. 

BILL DUGAN, Concert Artist Bureau, Portland, 
Ore. 

CHARLES FLOHE, manager, Majestic, Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

LEO BLANK, district manager, Monogram, Des 
Moines and Omaha. 

FELIX JACKSON and his wife are en route 
from the Coast to attend the opening of "Her's 
to Hold." 

Republic Abolishes Its 
Studio Publicity Dept. 

(Continued from Page 1) 

department, Len Boyd, his assis- 
tant, William Porter and Ambrose 
Barker to leave the lot in two weeks. 
The four girls employed in depart- 
ment are expected to be transferred 
to the stenographic department. 

Republic's home office plans to 
merge the local publicity department 
with its advertising and exploita- 
tion departments and will send a 
representative to handle material 
here. Only a skeleton department 
will be maintained at the studio. 



Short Subjects Forced, 
Says Philly Allied Unit 

Philadelphia — Direct charge that 
"unnecessary and unwanted short 
subjects are being forced" by dis- 
tributors is again made by Sidney 
E. Samuelson, business manager of 
Allied Independent Theater Owners 
of Eastern Pennsylvania, Allied af- 
filiate, in a bulletin just released to 
unit's membership. 

Largely devoted to the rentals sit- 
uation, bulletin contends that "the 
box-office problem of the independent 
exhibitor is aggravated by the gigan- 
tic film squeeze play being staged 
by the distributors." 

"Feature product, actually pro- 
duced and ready for release, is be- 
ing hoarded; old features and re- 
issues are being withdrawn and fea- 
ture prints have been reduced," bul- 
letin maintains, adding, "Now is the 
time for exhibitors to take a stand 
and make it stick." 



STORKS 



Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Bush are 
the parents of a six-pound son born 
on Sunday at the Mt. Vernon Hos- 
pital, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Bush is J 
exploitation manager of 20th-Fox| 
under Hal Home. 



... 



m 



"am -l: // 



Melisse" . . . One of America's 



GREATEST WOMAN AD ARTISTS 



Does Her Impression of the Year's 



GREATEST WOMAN'S PICTURE 



For Paramount's Ad Campaign in the 



GREATEST WOMEN'S MAGAZINES 




"HpHEY'RE in the army now! I've just seen these 3 adorable stars in an 

■*- advance screening of 'So Proudly We Hail,' and I think it's the greatest 

'woman's picture' ever. It's the first dramatic LOVE STORY OF OUR 

WOMEN AT WAR . . . makes you feel like joining the Waves, Waacs, 

Red Cross — anything to help destroy the enemy — Quick! 



v ted ijn 




IT'S all about a bunch of lovely girls 
who are right in the thrilling thick 
of things at the front, and believe me 
you've never seen SUCH EXCITE- 
MENT as these girls get into — fight- 
ing through rough 'n tough sequences 
black and blue. 



"OEEING 3 STARS as famous as Claudette Colbert, Paulette Goddard and 
Veronica Lake in 3 great romances in one picture certainly puts a lot 
of ideas into your head . . . (Stop righting, boys — you can have the three 
of them — that is, for your walls!) 





'T 



HEY have to snatch love on the run 
and there are parts and partings that will 
just about break your heart ... so don't for- 
get to bring your hankies, especially when 
Paulette — Boo Hoo! gulp. 



. mm. ->• 



J^- jn^ t t .. . . 

|[S^ PROUDLY Wr\U I 



THAT'S what I call 
a TERRIFIC 
ROMANCE! I mean 
between Claudette and 
George Reeves. She 
borrows a skirt from 
"Ma" McGregor to get 
married in — thought 
dungarees might be con- 
fusing. And they spend 
their wedding night in 
a fox-hole, of all things! 



^\4 








AND P/ 
■ don't 



PAULETTE — if you 
mind — goes around 
wearing a black sheer night 
gown as an evening dress — to 
keep up her Morale she says. 



ND watch for that scene where she and 
Veronica have A REAL FIGHT— WoW! 



not bad — Slap, sc-ratch. . .meoW! 



51NP- 





HEARD in the most unusual places, "What's up 
with Veronica?" Answer, "Her hair." Yessir, 
The Lake exposes her entire face for her country 
and she sure goes through something in this picture 
specially when she screams — "Sure I'm a nurse — an angel of mercy. But 
I want to kill, Yes KILL! every blood-stained Jap I can lay my hands on!" 
And when her buddies are about to be captured she walks cold as ice 
into the enemy lines and gives her beautiful self up to the Japs — (they 
think). But there's a catch to it — you'll see! 




OW take a good look at this, girls . . . It's 

Sonny Tufts, Paramount's NEW STAR 

on the male list. ..A big, tall, good-natured guy, 

handsome and blond, with a very interesting 

chest expansion and line. Wheww. . .Wheww. 




YES, this picture has all this for the girls and of course nothing missing for the 
boys. In one scene Georgie Reeves has to be bathed by Paulette. Says George — 
"No female is going to bathe ME!" but Claudette teaches him different ... and the 
part where Sonny tells Paulette "If you don't wait for me I'll break your neck!" 
Mmmm — he's Wonderful! And so is the production and direction, for V \\ ./ 

which I'd like to give Mark Sandrich the Melisse stamp of approval. — ^^^, 







HE'S put in loads of wonderful touches 
like the bit where one of the girls 
receives a package from home — a big pic- 
ture hat trimmed with cherries .. .Not what 
the well-dressed warrior will wear at the 
battlefront! . . . But this picture is so full of 
interesting and exciting things I can't begin 
to tell them all. Just SEE IT!" 

TTlsl/ssz 






In response to exhibitor requests, the foregoing art and 
copy material, condensed into full-page ad form as it will 
appear in the fan magazines, has been made AVAILABLE 
FOR LOBBY DISPLA Y in 40 x 60 two-color enlargements. 




WILL ADVERTISE IT IN 35,000,000 COPIES OF 

Good housekeeping . ^roman's 

Home Companion • cJfttcCall's Magazine 

Fifteen C^an Magazines (fm Pa g «) 

jQjfe, dQpok, 7~ime, ^iberty, ^ed Book, Cosmopolitan 
True ^tory, American, (^\ick and ^ic {Full Columns) 

SIMULTANEOUSLY WITH ITS PREMIERE 
AT RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL 




* 



COLBERT GODDARD • LAKE 



in 

u 



+ go Proudly 
* We Hail 



• 



a MARK SANDRICH production 

with George Reeves • Barbara Britton • Walter Abel • Sonny Tufts 

Directed bjf Mark SandMch • Written by Allan Scott • A Paramount Picture 



Tuesday, July 13, 1943 



Vtifa 



11 



-V > R€VICUS Of THE R6UJ flLfllS :< " 



"The Sky's the Limit" 

with Fred Asfaire, Joan Leslie 
RKO 89 Mins. 

SWELL LIGHT COMEDY SATISFAC- 
TORILY TEAMS ASTAIRE AND MISS LES- 
LIE; STRONG BOX OFFICE SHOWING IN- 
DICATED. 

The sky's the limit on the entertainment 
' 9fe of Fred Astaire's newest film, a light 
^7dy that teams him happily with Joan 
Leslie. The dancing comedian breezes 
through his role to the complete delight 
of his fans, carrying Miss Leslie along with 
him to deserved success in a chain of situa- 
tions that are good for plenty of laughs. 

The emphasis in "The Sky's the Limit" 
is strictly on fun. Edward H. Griffith's di- 
rection holds the film to a snappy pace 
throughout and keeps the humorous content 
uppermost at all times. Only two or three 
dance numbers are permitted to break up 
the action, and none of them is spectacular 
enough to steer attention away from the 
story itself, which is the main thing in this 
film. 

As Astaire's singing and dancing partner 
Miss Leslie reveals a new assurance and 
poise in a part that calls upon her to ex- 
ercise her comedic talents. She serves as 
a good foil for the brash Astaire. 

Given nice production touches by David 
Hempstead, the film derives from a screen- 
play by Frank Fenton and Lynn Root which 
contains some surprisingly good comedy lines 
that fit the Astaire personality perfectly. 
The yarn is scarcely to be taken seriously. 
It is from first to last a gay romp in which 
Astaire has a chance to play the sort of 
role best suited to him — that of the cocky 
blade who makes himself obnoxious in his 
determination to win a fair heart, which 
happens to be Miss Leslie's this time. 

Astaire plays a Flying Tiger back home 
on a brief furlough before undertaking a 
new assignment. To avoid annoyance he 
dons civilian clothes and sets out on a round 
of fun on which he meets Miss Leslie, a 
photographer with whom her boss, a mag 
publisher, is in love. Astaire gets the gal 
after a lot of hilarious complications. Much 
of the comedy revolves around Astaire's 
efforts to keep his identity from Miss Les- 
lie. 

Astaire and Miss Leslie are supported by 
a fine cast in which Robert Benchley stands 
out strongly as the publisher. Benchley 
steals the show several times. 

CAST: Fred Astaire, Joan Leslie, Robert 
Benchley, Robert Ryan, Elizabeth Patterson, 
Marjorie Gateson, Freddie Slack and His 
Orchestra. 

CREDITS: Producer, David Hempstead; As- 
sociate Producer, Sherman Todd; Director, 
Edward H. Griffith; Screenplay, Frank Fen- 
ton, Lynn Rot; Cameraman, Russell Metty; 
Special Effects, Vernon L. Walker; Songs, 
Johnny Mercer, Harold Arlen; Dance Direc- 
tor, Fred Astaire; Musical Director, Leigh 
Harline; Art Directors, Albert S. D'Agostino, 
Carroll Clark; Set Decorators, Darrell Sil- 
vera; Claude Carpenter; Soundman, Richard 
Van Hessen; Film Editor, Roland Gross. 

DIRECTION, Good. PHOTOGRAPHY, 
Good. 



"Danger! Women At 
Work" 

with Patsy Kelly, Mary Brian, Isabel Jewell 

(HOLLYWOOD PREVIEW) 
PRC 60 Mins. 

PLEASANT LITTLE COMEDY WITH 
FRESH THEME PROVIDES GOOD ENTER- 
TAINMENT. 

Here is a pleasant little comedy, which 
has a fresh theme. It has been given good 
production by Jack Schwarz and his asso- 
ciate producer, Harry D. Edwards, with Sam 
Newfield's direction responsible for plenty 
of comedy. 

Patsy Kelly comes through with another 
splendid performance as a comedienne, while 
Cobina Wright, Sr., Betty Compson, Mary 
Brian and Isabel Jewell are among the 
principals. 

Patsy and her roommates, Mary Brian 
and Isabel Jewell, enter the trucking busi- 
ness when Patsy's uncle leaves her a truck. 
The girls agree to haul a gambler's para- 
phernalia from Los Angeles to Las Vegas. 

En route to Las Vegas, they pick up 
Cobina Wright, Sr. a socialite, who is afflict- 
ed with amnesia. They also give a ride 
to Wanda McKay, an heiress, who is flee- 
ing from her father, and Betty Compson, a 
fortune-teller. 

To complicate matters, the truck is 
chased by high-jackers and detectives seek- 
ing a $5,000 reward for finding Wanda Mc- 
Kay, and Cobina Wright, Sr.'s husband. 

Gertrude Walker and Edgar G. Ulmer 
wrote the original story and Martin Mooney 
the screenplay. Ira H. Morgan's photog- 
raphy is first-rate. 

CAST: Patsy Kelly, Mary Brian, Isabel 
Jewell, Wanda McKay, Betty Compson, Co- 
bina Wright, Sr., Allan Byron, Warren Hy- 
mer, Michael Kirk, Vince Barnett. 

CREDITS: Leon Fromkess in Charge of 
Production; Producer, Jack Schwarz; Asso- 
ciate Producer, Harry D. Edwards; Direc- 
tor, Sam Newfield; Authors, Gertrude Wal- 
ker and Edgar G. Ulmer; Screenplay, Martin 
Mooney; Cameraman, Ira Morgan, ASC; 
Art Director, Frank Sylos; Editor, Robert G. 
Crandall. 

DIRECTION, Good. PHOTOGRAPHY, 
First-rate. 



Schines Close in Bucyrus 

Bucyrus, O. — Southern Theater, a 
Schine house which has been operat- 
ing a week-end policy, is closed for 
the Summer. 



Micu-Becker Acquire 
Celina, O., Theaters 



Fort Wayne, Ind. — John Micu and 
Clarence W. Becker, owners of the 
Indiana and State theaters, have 
purchased a half-interest in two 
theaters in Celina, 0., the Ohio and 
the Fayette. The two Celina the- 
aters will continue to operate un- 
der the present management. 



Urges Confirmations of 
Bookings of War Shorts 

Eldora, la. — Plea that all ex- 
changes follow the example set by 
Metro and adopted by 20th-Fox in 
sending out advance confirmations 
of the block-booked Government- 
WAC free shorts distributed by them 
is voiced by Leo F. Wolcott, president 
of Allied-Independent Theater Own- 
ers of Iowa-Nebraska. 



"Prairie Chickens" 

with Jimmy Rogers, Noah Beery, Jr. 
UA-Roach 46 Mins. 

LATEST ROACH OFFERING IS OLD- 
FASHIONED SLAPSTICK THAT WILL 
MAKE A HIT CHIEFLY WITH KIDS. 

"Prairie Chickens" is out-and-out slap- 
stick aimed strictly at kids and adults not 
particular about the entertainment they get. 
This sort of stuff has been done to death on 
the screen. Only a person whose risibilities 
are easily touched will be able to work up 
more than a smile over the doings in the 
picture, which is the latest of the "stream- 
lined" features being turned out by the Hal 
Roach outfit. Time has worn some of the 
tricks in "Prairie Chickens" pretty thin. 
It is one of the film's assets that it runs 
but 46 minutes. 

What happens in the picture is purely 
for the kids. Although there's no end of 
rushing about, nothing much actually tran- 
spires in the course of the story, an extreme- 
ly silly affair. The plot has to do with the 
efforts of a crooked ranch foreman to 
drive off visitors who are interfering with 
his activities. Among the visitors are the 
owner, some cowboys and a boodle of beau- 
ties, who supply some sort of excitement 
for the men by rushing about screaming 
while clutching their garments. One of the 
foreman's pet devices is having his stooges 
make up as ghosts. The guy has the upper 
hand until Jimmy Rogers and Noah Beery, 
Jr., gets on the job and lower the boom 
on him. 

The shining light in the cast is Jack 
Norton, that perennial screen drunk. Play- 
ing the owner of the ranch, he runs away 
with whatever there is to run away with in 
"Pairie Chickens." He is responsible for 
most of the laughs in the film. Besides 
Rogers, Beery and Norton others in the 
cast include Joe Sawyer, Marjorie Wood- 
worth, Rosemary La Planche, Raymond Hat- 
ton, Ed Gargan, Frank Faylen. 

Hal Roach, Jr.'s direction is fast but no 
more. Fred Guiol produced from a screen- 
play by Arnold Belgard and Earle Snell based 
on a stoy by Donald Hough. 

CAST: Jimmy Rogers, Noah Beery, Jr., 
Joe Sawyer, Marjorie Woodworth, Rosemary 
La Planche, Jack Norton, Raymond Hatton, 
Marge Ann Deighton, Ed Gargan, Frank Fay- 
len, Dudley Dickerson. 

CREDITS: Producer, Fred Guiol; Director, 
Hal Roach, Jr.; Screenplay, Arnold Belgard, 
Earle Snell; Based on story by Donald 
Hough; Cameraman, Robert Pittack; Spe- 
cial Effects, Ray Seawright; Art Director, 
Charles D. Hall; Film Editor, Bert Jordan; 
Sound, William Randall; Set Decorator, W. 
L. Stevens. 

DIRECTION, Fair. PHOTOGRAPHY, 
Okay. 



* SHORTS * 



"Sullivans" Via 20th-Fox 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Twentieth-Fox will 
finance and release the Sam Jaffe- 
Lloyd Bacon film, "The Sullivans," 
based on the combined stories of the 
five Sullivan boys who lost their 
lives on the cruiser Juneau. Film 
will be made on the Fox lot and part 
of the proceeds will go to the Sulli- 
van family. Jaffe will produce and 
Bacon direct. 



"Bill Jack vs. Adolf Hitler" 

(March of Time) 

20th-Fox 17 mins. 

Excellent 

March of Time's latest release is 
easily one of the best of the series. It 
records an experiment in labor-man- 
agement relations that packs terrific 
interest. The subject is the defense 
plant operated by Bill Jack, who 
uses paternalism to the ultimate de- 
gree to get the most out of his work- 
ers. The footage shows the means 
by which Jack is able to attain a 
production record that has won him 
nation-wide attention. It is a fan- 
tastic success story which argues 
for the application of the human 
touch to dealings between boss and 
worker. The free services made 
available to the employes make up an 
amazing list. Practically everything 
is supplied free to the workers in 
return for their loyalty to the man- 
agement — a loyalty that drives them 
to give their all for the boss. Wage 
earners and employers alike will be 
drawn to the film, which has the 
potentialities of a strong box-office 
attraction. The subject has been di- 
rected superbly by Jack Glenn. Rich- 
ard <de Rochemont has done a whale 
of a job in his capacity of managing 
editor. 



"He Can't Make It Stick" 



(Color Rhapsody) 



Columbia 



7 Mins. 



Timely and Punchy 

Characterized by its distributor as 
"a colorful burlesque on a famous 
paper-hanger in Austria," meaning, 
of course, Adolph Hitler, tab produc- 
tion is more exactly an allegorical 
comedy which recounts how impos- 
sible it is for the Shicklegruber wall- 
paper (Nazism) to be made to stick 
on the wall-surfaces (nations) of 
the world. Footage brings out the 
madness, recklessness, and cruelty 
of the Nazi regime, and pokes fun 
at the authors of that political credo. 
The animation by Volus Jones and Jim 
Armstrong is both expert and hilari- 
ous. Audiences, even though they 
might miss some of the amusing and 
subtle facets of the allegory, will, 
nevertheless enjoy the short heartily. 
Tops in the chain of scenes is Adolph 
eating a rug. It's timely and packs 
a wallop. 



Charles Ryan Recovering 

Chicago — Charles Ryan, Warner 
theater exec, here, is improving rap- 
idly from a slight stroke sustained 
while in Atlanta. Ryan went South 
to visit his son at Fort McClellan, 
Ala. 



Playing Mexican Product 

Houston — Horwitz Palace and Iris 
are playing Mexican pix. 



WBt 



12 



W^V DAILY 



Tuesday, July 13, 1943 



OWI Wants Kaslner 
For Overseas Pix Job 



(Continued from Page 1) 

for the division of occupied Europe 
into two film distribution zones fol- 
lowing the take-over by the United 
Nations, with Laudy Lawrence, al- 
ready abroad, in charge of one and 
the other probably going to Kast- 
ner if his services can be obtained. 

Morris Helperin and Ray Radin, 
the latter formerly with Buchanan 
& Co., have arrived in Algiers to fill 
OWI overseas assignments, it was 
learned yesterday. 



Fourth for "Profession" 

M-G-M's "The Youngest Profes- 
sion" has been held over for a 
fourth week at the Radio City Mu- 
sic Hall, N. Y., starting Thursday. 

Film Daily 
Issues Book 



One of the events of a motion 
picture editor's desk, each year, 
is the arrival of "The Film 
Daily Year Book of Motion 
Pictures." It weighs at least 
10 pounds and has voluminous 
pages. This year it is bound 
in imitation white leather, with 
blue and gold embossing, which 
gives it handsome appearance. 
Should an editor attempt to 
read each of its thousands of 
words, it would take from the 
time it is received until the 
next year book arrives. 

Published by Film Daily, motion 
picture newspaper, it knows all, 
sees all, tells all. And a perusal of 
it suggests the immensity of the film 
industry and its many kindred busi- 
nesses. To suggest its comprehen- 
siveness, it lists all the important 
telephone numbers in Hollywood and 
gives surveys of the world situation 
in pictures in all countries. 

This year, material is varied with 
the advent of the United States 
presented, for the first time, as one 
of the big producers of Hollywood. 
Producing government shorts, the 
United States has an impressive 
record of subjects. 

Moreover, it gives the ramifica- 
tions of the government as an ex- 
hibitor. With armed forces scattered 
over the country, the year book 
states that the government now 
operates 1205 theaters. With this 
added to the nation's vast exhibitors' 
field, it shows the added drain upon 
Hollywood resources. 

Reprinted from 

Spokesman Review, Spokane 

July 4, 1943 



TO THE COLORS! 



* COMMISSIONED * 

MELVYN DOUGLAS, USA, commissioned a cap- 
tain. 

EDWARD FULD, USN, formerly vice-president, 
American Ticket Corp., Chicago, commis- 
sioned a lieutenant (j.g.l. 

CHARLES GLETT, USA, general manager, Myron 
Selznick Agency, commissioned a major. 

— • — 

* PROMOTED * 

LT. BEN FELDMAN, USA, formerly United Artists 
manager, Chicago, to captain. 

— • — 

* ARMY * 

EVERETT SORENSON, city manager, Gregory The- 
ater, Vincennes, Ind. 

WILLIAM POFESK1, Cosmo Theater, Chicago. 

STANLEY KRENITZ, son of Joe Krenitz, Uni- 
versal manager, Cleveland. 

ROD KIRKWOOD, son-in-law of Vic Cauntlett, 
Harrick Evergreen Theaters advertising man- 
ager, Seattle. 

FRANK CHRISTIE, Evergreen salesman, Seattle. 

ARTHUR SANFORD, manager, Majestic, Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

EDWARD HILKE, manager, Perrien, Detroit. 

HUGH SHEPLY, Universal still dept., Hollywood. 



LYNTON VINETTA, Universal still dept., Holly- 
wood. 

LEWIS 'BLUMBERC, editorial dept., Universal, 
Hollywood. 

BEN KAMSLER, dialogue and casting director, 
Hollywood. 

FRANK TIPPER, animator, Hugh Harmon Produc- 
tions, Hollywood. 

* NAVY * 

CLEO R. ANDERSON, Universal, Hollywood. 
DON CRINACER, Universal, Hollywood. 
HUBERT SMITH, JR., Universal, Hollywood. 
KENNETH SHAUER, son of Melville A. Shauer, 
Hollywood. 

* WAC * 

RACHEL 11CHTIZER, wardrobe dept., Universal, 
Hollywood. 

* WAVES * 

ENSICN SHIRLEY BUSCH, daughter of the Para- 
mount projectionist, Chicago. 

* ACTIVATED * 

LT. (j.g.) DOUGLAS F. GEORGE, public relations 
representative, 20th-Fox, Cleveland. 



WAR SERVICE 

. . .on the Film Front 



Republic Increasing 
Musicals Production 



(Continued from Page 1) 

production plans for forthcoming 
productions and the Roy Rogers pub- 
licity campaign and delegates will 
hear of increased musicals produc- 
tion by Republic and of production 
and promotion schedules for "The 
Fighting SeaBees" and "Convoy to 
Malta." 

Present will be the following ex- 
changemen: Arthur Newman, Al- 
bany; Jack Davis, Boston; Sam Selet- 
sky, New Haven; Morris Epstein and 
Sidney Picker, New York; Joseph 
Engel, Philadelphia; Jack Bellman, 
Buffalo; S. P. Gorrel, Cleveland; G. 
H. Kirby, Cincinnati; I. H. Pollard, 
Detroit; L. W. Marriott, Indianap- 
olis; Franchise Holders Jake Flax, 
Washington; J. H. Alexander and 
Sam Fineberg, Pittsburgh. A. W. 
Perry, Paul Nathanson, and A. J. 
Laurie represent Republic's Canad- 
ian distributors. Home office con- 
tingent includes Walter L. Titus, Jr., 
Grover C. Schaefer, Albert E. Schil- 
ler, Edward Seifert, Seymour Borus 
and Charles Reed Jones, Director of 
Advertising and Publicity. 



Century Circuit Wins Two 
Motions in Empire Fight 

(Continued from Page 1) 

IATSE's Local 306. The first per- 
mitted the circuit to exercise its 
temporary injunction against Em- 
pire until the case is disposed of in 
court. The second defeated Empire's 
efforts to have the case transferred 
from Brooklyn to Manhattan. Both 
motions were granted by Justice 
William Wilson in Kings County Su- 
preme Court. 

The temporary writ was granted on 
May 10 on the representation of 
counsel for the circuit that coercion 
was being used to get Empire mem- 
bers to vote for the dissolution of 
the union. 



Capt. Charles Eddy Dead 

Radburn, N. J. — Capt. Charles 
Wallace Eddy, 84, retired producer 
of amateur theatricals who presented 
the first so-called "big girl" act in 
professional vaudeville for some two 
years on the B. F. Keith circuit in 
the 1890's, died here Sunday at the 
residence of his son, Albert C. Eddy. 



Gerald A. Kelleher Dead 

Gerald A. Kelleher, 42, founder 
and president of the Empire Broad- 
casting Corp., makers of records and 
transcriptions, at 480 Lexington 
Ave., died Saturday in New York 
Hospital. 



Exhib. Held as Mob Wrecks 
City Hall; Curfew Blamed 

Olive Hill, Ky.— J. H. Mills, op- 
erating theaters here and in More- 
head, is one of 16 under arrest, large- 
ly on charges of confederating and 
handling, following a mob outbreak 
that resulted in the wrecking of this 
place's city building. 

While police said that the cause 
of the outbreak was obscure, they 
were inclined to attribute it to a 
curfew order by Police Judge James 
Carpenter closing the streets to min- 
ors at midnight. 

The 16 arrested, released on $500 
bonds each, will have a hearing be- 
fore County Judge George McClave 
in Grayson today. 



EAC Plan Operative Sunday 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM \DAILY 

Hollywood — Procedure for the is- 
suance of Extended Availability Cer- 
tificates to eligible studio employes 
has been approved by the Labor- 
Management Committee of the mo- 
tion picture industry, an area sub- 
committee of the WMC. Sunday is 
the effective operating date of the 
plan. 



ES. 



Houston— Local theatermen are co-oper- 
ating with the Navy Mothers Club in a 
concentrated two weeks' drive to collect 
junk jewelry of the trinket variety to be 
used by the armed forces in barter overseas. 
... — V ... — 

Chicago — Pete Panagos of Alliance 
cuit reports the cigaret drive by the Gre§ 
houses will net more than $3,500 for 
"smokes" for the overseas armed forces. 
Drive was staged by James Gregory, circuit's 
director of theaters, for the circuit. 
. . . _ V . . . — 

Peoria, III. — Leonard Worley, Illinois City 
chairman for the WAC, reports that the 
campaign to buy a bomber called the "Spirit 
of Peoria" had gone over the top. 

With the final figures still unavailable 
from all the 43 issuing agents in the county, 
a sum of $300,000 over and above the Peoria 
June quota of $1,200,000 has already been 
tabulated. This will mean that a heavy 
bomber carrying the name of the country 
that made it possible, will soon be chris- 
tened. 

... — V ... — 

Rochester — In a city- wide "combined 
operation" between retailers, the press, and 
exhibitors, Rochester opened its "Shangri- 
La" campaign with such wide-spread pub- 
licity that the city goal of over $320,000, 
will, in every probability, be exceeded. 

According to Lester Pollock, WAC 
Rochester Publicity chairman, more than 16 
free ads appeared in Gannett's local dailies, 
Democrat & Chronicle and Times-Union, in 
the drive's first few days. 



Swing Shift Shows in 
Four Seattle Theaters 



Seattle, Wash. — Four local thea- 
ters are running late shows and reg- 
ular swing-shift programs for war 
workers. Embassy opens at 8:30 
a.m., running through until 5 a.m. 
The Coliseum opens at 10 a.m., the 
Colonial at 8:55 a.m., and the Winter 
Garden, 9:00 a.m., all operating until 
5 a.m. 



Eddie Rivers Leases Plaza 

Walla Walla, Wash.— Eddie Rivers 
has leased the Plaza Theater at 
Waitsburg. House was formerly op- 
erated by Charles Laidlaw of Day- 
ton. Rivers will continue as city 
manager for the Gregory chain at 
Walla Walla. 



Acquire Seattle's Broadway 

Seattle, Wash. — Paul Westlund 
and Walter Roe have taken over the 
Broadway Theater from- Paul Aust 
and will operate it in conjunction 
with the Mount Baker and American 
Theaters. 



Semper Fidelis 

Chicago — Pvt. Edward Macil, 
USMC, formerly with American Tick- 
et Corp., was killed in action 

■Si in the Solomons, according to 
\p^5 offiical notification to hfs 
family here. 




•and don't get caught short with limited 
playing time on THIS one — the sensational 
JAP-EXPOSE show that will make the nation 
fighting mad! . • . Premiere in August.. 



J??, 1 * Tl « WORST 
ABOUT THi 




&S&^w$i*^&£ 



<IAI*SI 



— and it's TERRIBLE!... much, much 
worse than you could imagine! . | 
Sensational scenes that will make you 
mad enough to want to smash them 
with your bare fists! 




SEE THE PICTURE THAT EXPOSES THE 
"SONS OF HEAVEN" EVEN MORE RUTH- 
LESSLY THAN "HITLER'S CHILDREN" 
BARED THE SHAME OF THE NAZIS! 



R K O 
RADIO 




MARGO • TOM NEAL • J. CARROL NAISH 
ROBERT RYAN • GLORIA HOLDEN 

Directed by EDWARD DMYTRYK 

Original Screen Play by EMMET LAYERY 



Tuesday, July 13, 1943 



Wk 



15 



DAILY 



Preview of "Tolls 
Attracts Notables 



Broadway's Rivoli tonight will 
house what is heralded to be the 
most distinguished audience ever to 
witness a press and invitational pre- 
view at that theater, as Paramount's 
screen version, in Technicolor, of 
Sfeest Hemingway's "For Whom the 
/ Tolls" has a special debut in 
advance of the film's regular world 
premiere there tomorrow night. Sale 
of tickets for the latter event will 
benefit the National War Fund by 
an estimated $7,000. Advance sales 
for the roadshow engagement already 
top the $20,000 mark, including the 
foregoing amount. 

Supported by a precedent-estab- 
lishing promotional campaign, em- 
bracing every angle of audience im- 
pression, and particularly notewor- 
thy in a large number of important 
billboards in the Broadway area 
"For Whom the Bell Tolls" is evok- 
ing tremendous fan and trade inter- 
est here and nationally. For the 
first itme in the annals of the New 
York Tribune, that newspaper de- 
voted on Sunday, last, the top half 
of its screen-and-stage section to 
layouts of stills from the picture, — 
an example of the strength and ver- 
satility of the campaign both in ad- 
vance and coincident with the atrac- 
tion's New York bow. 

Tonig-ht's press and invitation preview 
will be heavily attended both by Paramount 
officials and organization's partners, latter 
including Nathan E. Goldstein, Martin J. 
Mullm, Sam Pinanski, Chester Stoddard, S. 
A. Lynch, R. J. "Bob" O'Donnell, William 
J. Jenkins, Hunter Perry, John J. O'Leary, 
J. J. Nolan, Adam Adams, and Harry Royster. 
Industry leaders from Paramount and other 
important wines of filmland will comprise, 
in part, Barney Balaban, Adolph Zukor, Neil 
Agnew, Leonard Goldenson, David Bernstein, 
Joseph R. Vog-el. Joseph Bernhard, Sam E. 
Morris, Dan Michalove. Duncan G. Harris, 
Richard C. Patterson. Jr.. Edward L Alper- 
son, Gus S. Eyssell, Harry C. Arthur, John 
W. Hicks, Jr.. C. C. Moskowitz, Ned E. 
Depinet. Ben Kalmenson, Gradwell L. Sears, 
T. J. "Tom" Connors, William F. Rodgrers A 
Montague, Sam Derrubow, Jr., William A. 
Scully. Harry Kalmine, Walter B. Cokell 
Louis Phillips, Robert Weitman, Leon Net- 
ter, Paul Raibourn. Georg-e Weltner, Charles 
M. Reagan, Russell Holman, Carl E. Milli- 
ken. C. J. Scollard, George Borthwick Ar- 
thur W. Kelly, Herman Robbins. Hugh Owen 
George A. Smith, and Dennis P. O'Brien. 

Prominently present, likewise, will be Bert- 
ram S. Nayfack, Abramham Frisch E W 
Hammons, Frank Meyer. Arthur Israel Jr ' 
M. W. Gowthorpe, William Brandt, Walter 
Reade, Arthur Mayer, Sam Rinzler. S. H 
Si ' Fabian, Ted Schlangrer, Al Boyd, Harrv 
Brandt, Max A. Cohen. Fred Schwartz, Louis 
Fnseh, Meyer Schine, I. J. Hoffman, New 
Haven; Carl Leserman, M. A. Sehlesinger, 
William Kupper, Edward Saunders, Robert 
Mochrie, James Grainger, Henry Randel, Lee 
Shubert, J. J. Shubert, Clayton Bond, Leo- 
pold Friedman, Jack Partington, Irving- Les- 
ser, Joseph Eagan, Harry Katz, A. M. Georger, 
Harold Auten, Eric Haight. 

Delegation from the important trade 
press will be augmented by representatives 
of general and fan magazines, as well as 
the top-flight syndicates. Executives of all 
radio networks and key commentators will 
also be on hand, among them William Paley, 
Alfred J. McCosker, Niles Trammell, Ed- 
ward Klauber, Mark Woods, W. E. McFar- 
lane, Earle McGill, William F. Shirer H. V. 
Kaltenborn, Kate Smith, Bill Stern, Ted Col- 
lins, Johannes Steel, Cecil Brown, Quincey 
Howe, Bessie Beatty, Estelle Sternberger, John 
Vandereook, Lisa Sergio, Robert St. John, 
Marion Young, Edward C. Hill, Dan Golden- 
Paul, Alma Kitchell, Frank Kingrdon, Boake 
Carter, Gabriel Heatter. 

Also attending will be: Commander Ed 



HCLLyWCCD DIGEST 



SIGNED 

MARCEL LOURNET, M-G-M. 

BEVERLY WHITNEY, termer, 20rh-Fox. 

B. P. FINEMAN, producer, Vanguard Films 

(David O. Selznick). 
PETER KNETO, termer, Universal. 
MARS PARKER, termer, M-C-M. 
MARY PARKER, termer, M-C-M. 
IRVING CUMMINCS, director, "Ten Percent 

Woman," Columbia. 
WERNER HEYMANN, songs, orchestrations, 

"Knickerbocker Holiday," Producers Corp. 

of America. 
GEORCE ARCHAINBAUD, two Hopalongs, Harry 

Sherman-UA. 

ASSIGNMENTS 

BART CARRE, production manager, "Harvest 
Melody," Walter Colmes-PRC. 

ALLEN GALE, screenplay, "Harvest Melody," 
Walter Colmes-PRC. 

BERNY BYRENS, associate producer, "Harvest 
Melody," Walter Colmes-PRC. 

DIMITRI TIOMKIN, musical score, "I Was a 
Criminal," Monogram. 

GEORCE ARCHAINBAUD, director, "Texas Mes- 
querade," Harry Sherman-UA. 

JOHN F. LINK, film editor, "Up in Arms," Sam- 
uel Goldwyn. 

• 

CASTINGS 

PHYLLIS BROOKS and EDDIE QUILLAN, "Hi 
Ya Sailor," Universal; IGOR IDOLCORUKE, 
MARIA PALMER, DENA PENN, "Revenge," 
RKO; RALPH MORGAN, "Jack London," Sam- 
uel Bronston Prod.; LESTER ALLEN, "Tropicana," 
Columbia; )OAN MORTIMER, "Henry Aldrich's 
Code of Honor," Paramount. 

LANA TURNER, "Frankie from Frisco," M- 
C-M; MARGARET O'BRIEN, "The Canterville 
Ghost," M-G-M; ELLA RAINES, "Hail the Con- 
quering Hero," Paramount; ACQUANETTA, "The 



Mummy Returns," Universal; RAMSAY AMES, 
"AM Baba and the Forty Thieves," Universal; 
HUGO HAAS, "Revenge," RKO; KENNY BAKER, 
"'Doughboys in Ireland," Columbia; BEVERLY 
WHITNEY, "Mexico City," 20th-Fox; BUD AB- 
BOTT and LOU COSTELLO, "Here Come the 
Co-eds," "Abbott and Costello in Society" and 
"The Naughty Nineties," Universal; ROBERT 
ALDA "Rhapsody in Blue," Warners; MARS 
PARKER, "Ziegfeld Follies," M-C-M; SARA 
ALLCOOD, "The Padre," Paramount; RUDOLPH 
MARTIN, "See Here, Private Hargrove," M-C-M; 
CLAUDE RAINS and GALE SONDERCAARD, "The 
Invisible Man's Return," Universal; MICHAEL 
DUANE, "Is Everybody Happy," Columbia; MARY 
PARKER, "Ziegfeld Follies," M-C-M; MIL- 
DRED HARRIS, "The Story of Dr. Wassell," Para- 
mount; BELITA, "Lady, Let's Dance," Mono- 
gram; HELEN PARRISH, PAUL McVEY, WILBUR 
MACK, JOHN FISHER, DONALD KERR and 
JOHNNY DUNCAN, "The Thirteenth Guest," 
Monogram; MADY CORRELL, "Texas Masquer- 
ade," Harry Sherman-UA; RICHARD CARLSON, 
"Kismet," M-C-M. 

SCHEDULED 

"Frankie From Frisco," original story, ROBERT 
HOPKINS, producer, ARTHUR HORNBLOW, 
JR., M-G-M. 

STORY PURCHASES 

"National Barn Dance," radio program, Para- 
mount. 

TITLE SWITCHES 

"My Kingdom for a Cook," formerly "With- 
out Notice," Columbia. 

RESIGNED 

TEX RITTER, Universal, to star in seven 
westerns. 

GEORGE SIDNEY, Metro. 



Postpone Dedication 
Of NEIC's Service Flag 

Dedication of the National Enter- 
tainment Industry Council service 
flag to honor those in every branch 
of the show world serving in the 
country's armed forces has been 
postponed from July 14 to Aug. 2. 
The site of the flag will be Broad- 
way and 43d St. 

Originally the dedication had been 
planned as an outdoor midnight 
event climaxing the first-day meet- 
ing of the two-day NE1C confer- 
ence at the Waldorf-Astoria. Ac- 
cording to the revised plan, the cere- 
mony will be held in a large mid- 
town theater, with the pledging of 
show talent to victory as an added 
feature. 



Educational Pix at Columbia U. 

A selected series of the newest 
educational films will be shown with- 
out charge in the Horace Mann 
Auditorium at Teachers College, Co- 
lumbia University this Summer on 
five successive Wednesdays, at 3 
p.m., beginning tomorrow and con- 
tinuing through Aug. 11. 



Lt. Parkman Davis Missing 

Rochester — Lt. Parkman W. Davis, 
formerly of Eastman Kodak, has 
been reported missing in action. He 
also has been awarded the Air Medal. 



DeLong:, Third Naval District; Edward Doyle, 
national director, Hospital Motion Picture 
Service; Captain B. D. Lion. U. S. Army 
Motion Picture Service; Commander R. H. 
Smith, U. S. Navy Motion Picture Exchange; 
R. B. Murray and Thomas Martell, U. S. 
Army Motion Picture Service, and Arch 
Mercey. 



Scully, Depinet Reiterate 
Policies on Adjustments 

(Continued from Page 1) 

the past five years any complaints 
that have been submitted by any ex- 
hibitor to me have always been set- 
tled satisfactory. . . 

"Our policy has been to satisfy 
each and every one of our accounts, 
and it will continue to be our policy 
to help anyone who is deserving of 
help, especially the exhibitors oper- 
ating small theaters." 

Wood yesterday also made public 
a letter from Ned E. Depinet, RKO 
Radio prexy, on the subject of ad- 
justments. Text follows: 

"Your letter of June 15th was most 
welcome in that it afforded me an op- 
portunity to again -publicly reiterate 
that RKO's established policy has 
been, is now and always will be to 
grant equitable relief to every ex- 
hibitor having a just complaint. This 
policy is consistently honored both 
by our men in the field and in the 
Home Office to the end that the ex- 
cellent relationships between RKO 
and its customers will be preserved." 



Signed for "Crazy House" 

Marion Hutton and the Modern- 
aires, formerly featured with the 
Glenn Miller orchestra, have been 
signed through the William Morris 
Agency to appear in the new Olsen 
& Johnson picture "Crazy House," 
for Universal. They start work on 
the film on July 20. 



20 More Cities Bid 
For Address by Coe 



[Continued from Page 1) 

cepted for a date to be set later in 
the month, while Coe will also take 
to the road again in August for at 
least one speaking engagement un- 
der the sponsorship of an outstand- 
ing civic organization. 

Series of meetings, inaugurated 
several months ago in Boston, has 
materially heightened general pub- 
lic interest in the film industry and 
its varied war services, it is evi- 
dent from the unanimously favor- 
able press comment. A notable fac- 
tor, too, is the growing respect for 
all phases of film biz by American 
business generally. 

The Coe speaking engagements, 
too, have permitted closer contact 
with educators, clerics and civic lead- 
ers, as well as newspaper publishers 
and editors, while the exhibitor 
round tables and forums that have 
paralleled the Coe public appear- 
ances have played their part in fur- 
thering the program. 

Coe yesterday was particularly 
enthusiastic over the interest mani- 
fested in the meeting in Los An- 
geles which was hosted by the Cham- 
ber of Commerce. Attended by 449 
business leaders and dignitaries, the 
ticket demand far exceeded the sup- 
ply, and an audience of 1,000 easily 
could have been assembled had fa- 
cilities afforded accommodations for 
that number. 

"I wouldn't take $200,000 for that 
meeting and what it accomplished," 
told The Film Daily yesterday. 



Dom. Youths to Register 
For War Work by July 24 

{Continued from Page 1) 

plan return to school in the Autumn 
or not. 

Thus the film trade is hit for a 
third time' by labor restrictions by 
selective service office in the present 
decree despite the recent plea by 
L. M. Devaney of RKO and Dave 
Coplan of United Artists for De- 
ferments for film business. 



Gives Benefit for Families 
Of Firemen Who Lost Lives 



Salt Lake City- — Tracy Barham, 
vice-president of Intermountain The- 
aters, Inc., a Paramount affiliate 
with headquarters here, has been 
commended by Mayor Ab Jenkins 
and Fire Chief LaVere M. Hanson 
for his community spirit in staging 
a midnight show for the benefit of 
the wives and children of three fire- 
men who lost their lives in the Vic- 
tory Theater fire. 



Acquire Bellingham House 

Bellingham, Wash. — Paul West- 
lund and Walter Roe have taken over 
the Broadway Theater, from Paul 
Aust and will operate it in conjunc- 
tion with Jhe Mt. Baker and Amer- 
ican theaters. 



wu- 




$eelfoas 






TO THE RKO SALES 
DELEGATES AND THE GREAT 
RKO-RADIO ORGANIZATION 



It gives me great personal 

pleasure that we are to be associated for 

another year, during which time I shall put 

into the hands of the RKO sales organization 
"THE NORTH STAR" ; which , believe to be 

the most powerful and ambitious picture I 
have ever made. 

Following "The North Star" will 
k e UP IN ARMS ^ a Technicolor comedy 

with music, introducing that truly great master 
of comedy, Danny Kaye, supported by Dinah 
Shore, who is proving to be as enchanting a 
comedienne as she is a singer, and two of 
the most vital young acting talents I have 



( 



y 



discovered in a decade — Dana Andrews and 
Constance Dowling. 

Also on this year's schedule will 
be "TREASURE CHESL" a pirate comedy 
with music, starring Bob Hope, and likewise 
to be filmed in Technicolor. 

I wish that I might be in attend- 
ance at the sales meeting now in session at 
the Waldorf-Astoria to express my apprecia- 
tion for your efforts on behalf of my produc- 
tions during the past two years and my faith 
in the future of your organization. 

It is my hope and belief that 
RKO-Radio under the new spirit of leader- 
ship which N. Peter Rathvon, Ned Depinet 
and Charles Koerner have brought to the 
company, is headed for the greatest year 
in its history. 




18 



THE 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 13, 1943 



Depinel lo Reveal 
RKO Program Today 



{Continued from Page 1J 

eon. Floyd B. Odium, RKO Corp. 
prexy, will speak briefly. In addi- 
tion to the delegates, present at the 
luncheon and meeting will be a con- 
tingent of executives and theater 
managers from the RKO theater de- 
partment headed by Edward Alper- 
son, general manager; reps, of Samuel 
Goldwyn, Sol Lesser, Walt Disney, 
and Edward A. Golden; and other 
guests, including executives from 
National Screen. 

This morning, the delegates will 
be given a private screening of two 
major pix for release next season 
at the Trans-Lux Theater. 

A strong note of optimism for the 
new season was sounded by Depinet 
yesterday in his opening address of 
welcome to the delegates. Other 
speakers were N. Peter Rathvon, 
president of RKO Corp.; Richard C. 
Patterson, Jr., vice-chairman of the 
board of RKO; Robert Mochrie, gen- 
eral sales manager; Harry Michal- 
son, short subjects sales manager; 
and Eddie Cantor, who will make his 
bow as a film producer with RKO 
Radio's "Show Business" for the new 
season. 

Rathvon praised the production 
work of the past year that has given 
the sales force outstanding prod- 
uct, with hit after hit. "Now there 
are no weak links in the RKO or- 
ganization," he stated. "We have 
come up with fine pictures, in the 
face of manpower shortage and vari- 
ous restrictions due to wartime." 

Michalson reviewed the shorts 
product for the past year, and the 
performance by the branches in the 
distribution of the "This Is Amer- 
ica" series, pointing to the enthu- 
siastic reception accorded it by ex- 
hibitors, reflected in a high volume 
of sales. 



FROM A REPORTER'S RKO NOTEBOOK 



Early Decision On 
"Aleutians" Release 



23 New RKO Salesmen 
Introduced by Depinet 

Twenty-three new members of 
RKO Radio's sales organization, who 
joined the company during the past 
year, were introduced by Ned E. 
Depinet to the delegates at the com- 
pany's annual sales meeting yester- 
day at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. 

Eighteen members of RKO Radio's 
sales and field staffs were promoted 



Para. News 9 Bayliss 
Dies In Bomber Crash 

Paramount's home office yesterday 
received word that Fred E. Bayliss, 
34, British Paramount News camera- 
man, was killed in the Libyan desert 
when a bomber on which he was 
completing his 23rd flight over Italy 
crash-dived on landing. He has been 
with Paramount News since 1930, 
and his first assignment was lens- 
reporting the Spanish Civil War from 
the Franco side. Surviving is a sis- 
ter. 



THE McCORMICKS, S. Barret and T. Bid- 
' well, had a reunion, thanks to the RKO 
sales meeting. Bidwell is an RKO exploiteer, 
working out from Denver. 

• • 

Jack Level, editor of RKO's house 
organ Flash, was given an ovation for 
his successful editing of "Salute," 
monthly organ specially serving ex- 
RKO-ites now in the U. S. armed ser- 
vice forces. "Salute," Prexy Depinet 
pointed out, was the first house organ 
to be issued in the interests of the 
fighting boys. 

• • 

Speaking of RKO's "Higher and Higher," 
there are two delegates who might be 
called "Higher and Lower." We mean Max 
Jolly six feet eight of Omaha and Clyde A. 
Pratt just five feet two. 

• • 

As usual the RKO Publicity gang 
took over the Sert Room mezzanine 
and handed out releases on request and 
otherwise. 

• • 

Barret McCormick, Terry Turner and 
Rutgers Neilson formed the greeting com- 
mittee that brought Charlie Koerner, Perry 
Lieber, Eddie Alperson and Harold Mirisch 
from the 20th Century. 

• • 

Harry Reiners of the field staff 
topped the gang in the gentle art of 
poker. 'Tis rumored Harry made ex- 
penses plus. 



Arthur Willi, with the shortage of leading 
men, fine-combed the salesmen in search 
of new Grants and Gables. 

• • 

Al Sindlinger, of the Gallup organi- 
zation, who is on the side a farmer 
out Princeton way, reported at the 
RKO Radio sales meeting that last 
week he sold the Waldorf-Astoria 150 
chickens. When broilers were served 
the delegates Monday, he thought he 
got one of his birds. 

Joe Heppner, official photographer of 
RKO Radio at its past twelve annual sales 
meetings, flashed his last bulb Monday be- 
fore reporting to the Army. Depinet, in 
tribute, called him to the dais, and himself 
took a picture of Joe. 

• • 

Kay "Disney" Kamen wasn't satis- 
fied until he saw red — Red Jacobs of 
'Frisco — a pal of days of yore. 



Charlie Zagrans of Philly with his trick 
Desperate Desmond mustache was nearly 
signed by Fred Ullman for his "Flicker 
Flashback" series. 

• • 

Aage Schubart, manager of exchange 
operations, almost forgot to answer 
present to his own name when he called 
the roll call. 



Florida State Theaters 
Operating Lynch Circuit 



Miami, Fla. — Florida State The- 
aters, Inc., operating theaters in 
more than 30 towns throughout Flo- 
rida, has assumed management of 
the 14 theaters operated by Para- 
mount Theaters, Inc., succeeding S. 
A. Lynch, who in May asked to be 
relieved of his duties because of 
the press of other business interests. 

Frank Rogers, president of Florida 
State Theaters, Inc., has been in 
Miami looking over the field. With 
him were M. C. Talley and B. B. 
Gardner, vice-presidents. 

George C. Hoover will be contin- 
ued as local manager of the 14 
houses, and there is to be no change 
in policy. 



to higher posts during the past year, 
Depinet told the delegates. 



Errol and Kennedy to 
Continue with RKO Radio 

Leon Errol and Edgar Kennedy 
will continue under the RKO Radio 
banner for another year, it was an- 
nounced at yesterday's session of the 
company's annual sales meeting at 
the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. Each 
of the comics will be starred in a 
series of six two-reel comedies. 



Cecilia Loftus Dies 

Cecilia Loftus, 67, veteran of the 
American and English stage, died in 
her hotel suite yesterday. Her son, 
Peter John Barrie Waterman, Lon- 
don theatrical producer, survives. 



Changes Said Expected in 
Army Pictorial Service 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — The Army is ex- 
pected to announce slight changes 
in the Army Pictorial Service, which 
has once again come under complete 
control of Col. Kirke B. Lawton, who 
was head of the Signal Corps' film 
activities before formation of the 
Army Pictorial Service. The APS 
itself is, and has always been, a 
part of the Signal Corps, but was 
put under Brig. Gen. Wm. H. Har- 
rison last Spring in an attempt to 
satisfy the Senate's Truman com- 
mittee. 

Just what General Harrison's 
stewardship brought about that re- 
quired his taking the position is not 
quite known, but the General has 
now been nominated to be a Major 
General and has stepped aut as chief 
of the APS. Promotion is consid- 
ered likely for Colonel Lawton, but 
that is strictly a speculative matter. 
With Harrison's leaving, the direct 
connection between APS and the 
Army Service Forces, under Lt. Gen. 
Brehon B. Somervell, dropped, al- 
though the Signal Corps is a part 
of the Army Service Forces. Col- 
onel Lawton was out of town at the 
week-end and could not be reached 
for comment. His executive officer, 
however, confirmed this correspon- 
dent's information that APS has al- 
ways been a part of the Signal 
Corps. 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Palmer Hoyt, new 
director of the OWI domestic branch, 
is expected to reach a decision this 
week on OWI clearance for the Army 
film, "Report from the Aleutians," 
made in color by Captain John W. y 
ton. Public showing of a two-rWl 
version of the reel has been com- 
mended by Lowell Mellett, retiring 
OWI film chief, but the Army is 
ho: jne out for public showing of 
its o :~ial film which runs to 50 
minv.iet. 

Genera: Alexander D. Surles, chief 
of the Army's Bureau of Public Re- 
lations, has already talked with in- 
dustry representatives about public 
showing for the film and Army 
sources report that he was assured 
the industry will show the film in 
whatever length the Army thinks 
best. The Army feels definitely that 
the two-reel version does not give 
the Aleutians sufficient coverage. 

The inside guess here is that Hoyt 
will go along with the Army, clearing 
the longer version of the film for 
public showing. The OWI controv- 
ersy regarding this film is another 
of the matters which is reported to 
have led to as many as three requests 
for Mellett's resignation. OWI, in 
its weakened state, is reported to be 
prepared to "butter up" to the Army 
because it will need all the support 
it can get hereafter. 



Small Exhibs. Can't Pay 
25%, Wolcott's Contention 



Eldora, la. — "No small exhibitor 
who will honestly figure his over- 
head can pay over 25 per cent for 
film and have anything left," Prexy 
Leo F. Wolcott of the Allied-Inde- 
pendent Theater Owners of Iowa- 
Nebraska declares in a current bul- 
letin. 



Patterson Reports 
867 RKO-ites Serve 

Addressing the delegates at yes- 
terday's opening session of RKO 
Radio's twelfth annual sales meeting 
at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, Col. 
Richard C. Patterson, Jr., vice-chair- 
man of the board of RKO Corp., an- 
nounced that 867 former employees 
of RKO have entered the nation's 
armed forces to date. Thirteen of 
the total of 867 are women, some 
of whom are in the WACS and 
others in the WAVES, SPARS, or 
Marines. 

Colonel Patterson revealed that of 
the total of 867, seven have been 
reported killed in action, one is a 
Jap prisoner of war, and eight have 
been wounded. Figures represent 
fighting activity on all the war fronts 
where U. S. forces are engaged. 



ROY ROGERS * T RIGGER" 

Kl N G OF THE COWBOYS SMARTEST HORSE IN THE MOVIES 




1. When the one-time famed Rodeo star, Sam Bennett (Harry Shan- 
non) is nearly killed while racing a chuck-wagon which has been 
improperly equipped, Roy Rogers (Roy Rogers) and The Sons Of 
The Pioneers (Themselves) leave the Calvert Brothers Rodeo. 




3. The young daughter turns out to be a most attractive young 
lady (Sheila Ryan), who is accompanied by her pert friend, Pat 
(Arline Judge). Sue takes a hand in what she considers the un- 
businesslike management of the ranch. 




. 



2. Roy and his pals plan their own Rodeo, which they are stock- 
ing at their "AII-4-One" ranch; and Roy persuades the boys to 
allow the impoverished Sam Bennett to pose as its owner during 
the visit of his young daughter. Sue. 




4. Sam Bennett tells her that Roy is his partner, and Sue per- 
suades the pair to sign a contract. She unwittingly plays into the 
hands of the Calvert Brothers by selling what she believes is her 
father's share of the ranch. 




5. Bennett threatens Jim Calvert (Barton Maclane), but is unable 
to regain the bill of sale. After a free-for-all, Roy decides to 
gamble the ranch on the results of a chuck-wagon race, the 
winner of which will obtain the rights to the property. 



SONG 




6. The race is a thriller, especially since Calvert has posted men 
on the course to try to cripple Roy's wagon. Roy wins, makes 
Bennett his foreman, and leaves with his crew on his first suc- 
cessful tour with his own Rodeo show. 





SHEILA RYAN • BARTON M AC LANE • HARRY SHANNON -PAT BRADY- ARLINE JUDGE 

o„d BOB NOLAN AND THE SONS OF THE PIONEERS 

JOSEPH KANE — Director • Original Screen Play by Winston Miller 

* A REPUBLIC PICTURE * BUY U. S. WAR SAVINGS BONDS * 



20 



Tuesday, July 13, 1943 



Production Pace 0f( 
As Only Six Start 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — With only six pix set 
to start this week, production pace 
again slackens here. Total shooting 
will be 44 when the newcomers get 
under way. The weekly check-up: 

At Columbia: Five shooting, in- 
cluding "Tropicana," musical, star- 
ring Mae West, Victor Moore and 
William Gaxton, with Hazel Scott, 
Xavier Cugat, Mary Roche, Leonard 
Sues and Lester Allen. Gregory Ra- 
toff producing and directing. 

At M-G-M: Ten shooting:. 

At Monogram: Two shooting". 

At Paramount: Five shooting. 

At RKO-Radio: Four shooting, including 
"Revenge." melodrama, with Toumanova, 
Gregory Peek, Alan Reed, Igor Bolgoruki, 
Lou Crosby, Dena Penn and Maria Palmer. 
Casey Robinson producing and Jacques Tour- 
neur directing. 

Samuel Goldwyn: Shooting two. 

At Republic: Two shooting, including 
"Here Comes Elmer." comedy with Al 
Pearce, Dale Evans. King Cole Trio, The 
Sportsmen. Gloria Stuart, Jan Garber and 
band. Joseph Santley directing and Armand 
Sehaefer is the producer. 

At 20th Century-Fox: Four shooting, in- 
cluding "Pin-Up Girl," in Technicolor, with 
Betty Grable, Joe E. Brown, Martha Raye, 
Charles Spivak and band. The Roller Follies, 
Inc. A William LeBaron production with 
Bruce Humberstone directing. 

At I*nited Artists: Two shooting, Sam- 
uel Bronston's "Jack London": and. Gregor 
Rabinovitch-Eugene Frenke production, "The 
Girl From Leningrad," drama, with Anna 
Sten and Kent Smith. Fedor Ozep directing. 

At Universal: Six shooting, including "Hi 
Ya Sailor," with Donald Woods, Elyse Knox, 
Jerome Cowan, Frank Jenks. Matt Willis. 
Phyllis Brooks and Eddie Quillan. Jean 
Yarbrough, directing and producing. 

At Warners: Four shooting. 



Unusual Jim Crow Rule Ntahes Operation of 

Three Houses Profitable in 2,600 Pop. Town 

Levelland, Tex. — A three-way Jim Crow rule is the unique practice of the 
Wallace Theaters, Wallace Blankenship, owner, here. There are three houses, 
with variable rules, in this 2,600 population town. The Rose, ace house, is for 
whites only. The Wallace. "B" house, allows Negroes in the balcony. The 
Old Rose, original house in the town, has three sections, one for Mexicans 
another for Negroes, and the third for whites, if they desire to attend. Space 
allocated for Mexicans is contracted or expanded, according to influx or de- 
parture of seasonal workers. 

An exhibition problem brought about the latter odd arrangement. When the 
new Rose built, it left the Old Rose without a place. This solution brought it 
into the profit column without interfering with the other houses. 



Macin in Capital to Buy 
Pic Equipment for Mexico 



Chattanoogans Elect Rogers 

Chattanooga, Tenn. — Emmett R. 
Rogers, manager of the Tivoli The- 
ater, local unit of the Wilby-Kincey 
circuit, Paramount affiliate, has been 
elected president of Chattanoogans, 
Inc., a civic organization. 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Francisco J. Macin, 
secretary for international affairs of 
the Mexican National Motion Pic- 
ture Syndicate, is in Washington 
now arranging for the purchase of 
equipment for the Mexican indus- 
try. The syndicate of which Senor 
Macin is secretary is divided into 45 
sections, with 10,000 members, and 
includes not only the technical work- 
ers but also the actors, artists, writ- 
ers and distributors, as well as em- 
ployes of all Mexican theaters. 

"Mexican films are especially wel- 
come by those illiterate or semi-il- 
literate populations of Latin-Amer- 
ican countries who can neither read 
nor understand the dialogue of for- 
eign motion pictures," Senor Macin 
said in a brief statement on Mexi- 
can production. "Our production 
fills, therefore a definite need," 

He will talk with labor leaders 
while in this country, it was an- 
nounced. Senor Macin is secretary 
for technical and economic affairs of 
the Mexican workmen's confedera- 
tion. 



Strict Curfew Sentiment 
Developing in Detroit 



Detroit — Local exhibitors have 
seen a close connection between the 
problems of youthful vandalism and 
hoodlumism which has plagued 
houses here for months, and the 
recent race riots, according to state- 
ments by several leading exhibitors 
in private conversations. 

The roving mobs that filled the 
streets for 24 hours were largely 
made up of teen-aged youngsters, 
including girls, who usually picked 
on a single victim of the opposite 
race. 

Discussion of curfew regulations 
is a natural result, and sentiment is 
fairly strong for a strict ordinance. 



Divorcement Backed 
By la.-Neb. Indies 

(Continued from Page 1) 

May 6 in the matter of the motion 
picture consent decree." 

The letter, signed by Leo F. Wol- 
cott, of Eldora, la., president, says 
that the association's action is trans- 
mitted "for your information / 
we trust, favorable action." ^ 

Allied's board at its meeting in 
Detroit in May called for theater 
divorcement, a ban on circuit expan- 
sion, increase in the size of blocks, 
elimination of Section XV of the 
New York censent decree, the end 
of blind-pricing and the strengthen- 
ing of Section VIII of the decree. 



Basils Move Offices 

Buffalo— Offices of the Basil Bros. 
circuit were moved last week from 
the Genesse Theater Building to the 
Lafayette Theater Building, recent- 
ly bought by Basil. 



Tomasino Buys "victory 

New Haven— The 600-seat_ Vic- 
tory here has been sold to Michael 
Tomasino, lessee for the past nine 
years. Andrew Ely was the owner. 



The ... . 
FEMME TOUCH 



MARGARET OWINCS, booker's stenographer, 
Warners, Seattle. 

ANNA ROSS MALLENDER, contract- clerk, War- 
ners, Seattle. 

JUNE HAWKINS, biller, Warners, Seattle. 

LORRAINE DOROTHY BASSIE, statistical clerk, 
Warners, Seattle. 

NANCY ANN STETT, ad sales clerk, Warners, 
Seattle. 

FAY SMITH, biller, United Artists, Seattle. 

BETTY GILBERT, assistant manager, Regent, 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 



National War Fund Drive 
Enlists Industry 'Names' 



New York Committee of the Na- 
tional War Fund which will conduct 
a $125,000,000 campaign this Fall 
for the benefit of 16 war related 
agencies, on the basis of accept- 
ances received through July 1, will 
include among others: Winthrop W. 
Aldrich, David Bernstein, Abe Last" 
fogel, Gertrude Lawrence, William 
Morris, Jr., Paul Moss, J. Robert 
Rubin, Spyros P. Skouras, Maj. L. 
E. Thompson and former Mayor 
James J. Walker. Skouras is also 
on the executive committee. 



Set "Canteen" Deeds in Ohio 

Cleveland — Jack Goldhar, United 
Artists district manager in town to 
negotiate with Meyer Fine of Asso- 
ciated Circuit for "Stage Door Can- 
teen," announces that the UA 
branch has already closed deals with 
Max Lefkowich and Henry Green- 
berger for their Community Circuit 
and with Milton A. Mooney of Co- 
operative Theaters for the theaters 
which he represents. Goldhar has 
also closed a deal with J. Real Neth 
for his Columbus houses. 



Grable and Massey Art 
To Air Copper Campaign 

To aid exhibitors publicize their 
now permanent copper, brass, and 
bronze program, the WAC secured 
the co-operation of Betty Grable and 
Ilona Massey to pose for a set of 
three stills which point out to movie 
patrons important aspects of the 
copper campaign. 

Stills, in mat form, will be fea- 
tured in the copper Press Book, pre- 
pared by the National Copper Salv- 
age Chairman Bob O'DonnelPs of- 
fice, and will shortly be available to 
exhibitors, free, from any National 
Screen Service exchange. 



Oboler GM Pic Footage 
To Metro as Stock Shots 



Metro has acquired footage from 
Arch Oboler's unreleased General 
Motors pic, "This Precious Free- 
dom," and will utilize it as stock 
shots in a two-reel special which 
the company will make. Oboler sub- 
ject starring Claude Rains was made 
about a year ago but put on the 
shelf by the company, reportedly 
because the company considered it 
"inflammatory." Pic was written 
and directed by Oboler from his ra- 
dio play of the same name. 



Badly on Treasury's WFC 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

. Los Angeles — Tom Baily, director 
of the Theater Defense Bureau, has 
been appointed chairman of the pro- 
gram, entertainment and talent com- 
mittee of the Treasury Department's 
War Finance Committee for South- 
ern California". 



"Definitely a Failure" 
Says Wolcott of Decree 

Eldora, la. — The New York con- 
sent decree "has definitely proved 
itself a failure," President Leo F. 
Wolcott of Allied-Independent The- 
ater Owners of Iowa-Nebraska, Inc., 
declares in a bulletin just released 
to his membership: 
Comments Wolcott: 
"It has not in actual practice done 
I away with block-booking or any of 
I the common abuses. It has been the 
cause of much higher film rentals. 
I Its arbitration is too expensive for 
small theaters and too limited by the 
J Decree for any real relief and, in 
view of the Crescent Court Case and 
I the more recent Welden Arbitration 
Case, we may certainly be pardoned 
I for expressing a preference for court 
; procedure and elimination of the 
Consent Decree altogether. Would 
to heaven it was as simple as that! 
But Mr. Wright of the Dept. of Jus- 
! tice is quoted as remarking 'The 
j Decree (could|may?) be contin- 
ued indefinitely'. Most distributors 
will undoubtedly press for its con- 
tinuation without too much change 
since it has proven extremely profit- 
able to them. 

"The National exhibitor groups 
have already drawn up amendments 
they are hopeful of having included 
in any extension. These have all 
been published in the trade press 
and cover a lot of territory, from 
MPTOA's full-line selling to Allied's I 
12-picture (UMPI) plan, with can- J 
cellations; changes in the arbitra-l 
tion set-up, etc. . . With no further I 
comment, let it be known we, in! 
common with the Pacific Coast | 
groups, and others, favor the Allied 
plan and are feverently hopeful the 
Department of Justice will this time 
listen to and be influenced by the 
exhibitors, who after all are the, ones 
most affected. . . Amen! \-, 

"We certainly urgently recom- 
mend to exhibitors that they write 
their U. S. Senators and Congress 
men protesting against continuation 
of the present motion picture Con- 
j sent Decree. This portion of this 
Bulletin could be sent, together with 
your comments in an accompanyin; 
i letter." 



Tuesday, July 13, 1943 



W*\ DAILY 



21 



1,000 Notables At 

de Seversky Dinner 



Close to 1,000 strong, motion pic- 
ture notables and other celebrities 
crowded the grand ball room of the 
Waldorf-Astoria last night to attend 
a dinner tendered by United Artists 
and Walt Disney in honor of Major 
Alexander P. de Seversky and to wit- 
n r ~&a special pre-release showing 

o. s latter's "Victory Through Air 

Power." 

Hosting the occasion were Elsa 
Maxwell, Walt Disney and Albert D. 
Lasker. The film received an en- 
thusiastic ovation for trying out, as 
it did, the theories advanced by de 
Seversky as to how the American 
and other Allied nations can sub- 
jugate the Axis nations by means of 
aerial superiority, particularly 
through the medium of the long- 
range bomber and fighter. 

The brilliant gathering was attend- 
ed by Ned E. Depinet, Spyros P. 
Skouras, Stanton Griffis, F. Barret 
McCormick, Robert Gillham, Jack 
Alicoate, Carl Leserman, Roy Dis- 
ney, Harry D. Buckley, Paul Lazarus, 
Jr., Don M. Mersereau, David "Skip" 
Weshner, George Hecht, Chester B. 
Bahn, Jacob Wilk, Abel Green, 
Charles "Chick" Lewis, and 
■ Harry Gold, Herbert Bayard 
Swope, George H. Morris, John 
Hertz, Jr., Jack Pegler, Johannes 
.Steel, Arthur W. Kelly, Sherwin 
,Kane, John C. Flinn, Herb Berg, 
Lawrence Tibbett, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
Robert Rubin, Martin Quigley, Nancy 
Carroll, Ted Socier, Lady Ashley, 
[Peggy Santry, Mrs. William Mitchell, 
(Perce Pearce, Adrienne Ames and 
many others from the film world. 



Vanguard Signs Fineman 
To Produce; Joins Shortly 

JVcst Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

. Hollywood — Daniel T. O'Shea, 
president of Vanguard Films, Inc., 
ias signed B. P. Fineman as pro- 
lucer for that company's extended 
program of pictures for release 
'through United Artists, of which 
{Vanguard is a 25 per cent owner, 
lineman leaves M-G-M to join Van- 
guard. 

n Stephen Longstreet, novelist, re- 
cently signed by Vanguard has been 
.assigned as a writer of the Fineman 
. ( mit. O'Shea stated that Fineman's 
t irst production would be announced 
.,:hortly. Fineman is taking a brief 
,/acation and returns to Vanguard 
vithin two weeks. 



And Both Were SRO 

Judy Garland was her own compe- 
tition at Camp Kilmer, New Bruns- 
wick, N. J., one night recently on 
her camp tour. While she was 
vocalizing in person at one of the 
theaters, her newest M-G-M film, 
"Presenting Lily Mars," was being 
shown at another nearby. P. S. Leo 
reports both houses were SRO. 



$17.69 GROSS 
ON % PICTURE 



Strange Rental Figures Result 
from Distrib. Policy 



Detroit — Insistence of major com- 
panies upon playing pictures per- 
centage all the way down the line 
has resulted in some strange rental 
figures in at least one small Detroit 
house where business hasn't been so 
hot the last few weeks, what with 
the heat, race riots, and competing 
neighborhood activities. 

The other night the house took 
in $17.69 gross on a percentage pic- 
ture! The manager arranged to play 
his major product in the middle of 
the week to stimulate ( ? ) business, 
and plays westerns on Sunday. 

Climax, however, was a two-day 
run of a percentage picture, played 
on a basis of $15 flat guarantee ren- 
tal plus 50 per cent over $40. The 
picture did $56 in two days, so the 
exhibitor paid in $23 to the distribu- 
tor. On this same run, the company 
had a checker on duty both nights. 



Appeal Board Refuses 
To Reopen Fried Case 

(Continued from Page 1) 

ris, Grand and Garrick in Norris- 
town, Pa. Arbitrator set up a clear- 
ance schedule which was sustained 
by the appeal board when Fried 
claimed that the relief was insuffi- 
cient. 

Appeal board award set a prece- 
dent in ruling that an intervenor 
may be penalized one day of clear- 
ance for each day of delay over 21 
days in playing product after first- 



Framingham Theater 
Asks Clearance Cut 

Boston — Latest arbitration case in 
this territory, filed July 7 by the 
Hollis Operating Co. against the five 
majors, — Loew's, 20th-Fox, Para- 
mount, RICO, and Vitagraph — , seeks 
clearance relief for the Hollis The- 
ater, Framingham. The stand rep- 
resents that, operating on second- 
run, it has to play 60 days after the 
St. George and Gorman Theaters, 
both in Framingham. It seeks clear- 
ance reduction to 14 days after the 
St. George, and one day after the 
Gorman. 



WMCA Will Broadcast 
At "Bill Tolls" Premiere 



WMCA will broadcast from the 
premiere of "For Whom the Bell 
Tolls," benefit performance for the 
National War fund at the Rivoli 
theater tomorrow from 8:30 to 8:45 
p.m. 

Participants include Prescott Bush, 
B. G. DeSylva, Sam Wood, Dorothy 
Lamour, Mary Martin and Betty 
Hutton. 



Tax Deductions Fail 
To Dip B. 0. "Takes' 



(Continued from Page 1) 

wholly out of the woods, they were 
unmistakably encouraged over the 
failure of the week-end's "takes" to 
dip downward. 

Tax deductions from pay envelopes 
at the week-end hit all those receiv- 
ing their first pay checks since July 
1, yet business across the country 
was equivalent to the last non-holi- 
day week-end and kept to the 15 to 
30 per cent higher level noted for 
some time in comparison with a year 
ago. 

Scanning reports from the field in 
connection with the survey, it is sig- 
nificant that few if any first-runs 
at the present time are playing so- 
called war pix, although they are 
prevalent in the subsequents. 

Pix reported by circuits and in- 
dies as doing the best biz today in- 
clude "Coney Island," "Stage Door 
Canteen," "Mr. Big," "Mr. Lucky," 
"Dixie," "Stormy Weather," "Back- 
ground to Danger," "Lady of Bur- 
lesque" and "Hit the Ice." 



Hub Biz Off from Early June 
Level but Ahead of Last Week 

Boston — Business over the week- 
end in virtually all Boston theaters 
was slightly off from early June 
but far in excess of the last week of 
that month and first week in July. 
A terrific heat wave again hit this 
section Saturday and this kept thou- 
sands from attending the theaters, 
with the usual week-end exodus to 
the beaches and mountians nearby. 

The OPA ruling on vacation gas 
rsesulted thus for in only 306 of 5,500 
applications being passed upon fav- 
orably so that this apparently did 
not affect theater attendance in the 
least but the nearby resorts got 
their full quota of patrons. Nan- 
tasket Beach reported 75,000 there 
on Saturday and again on Sunday, 
with Revere Beach having a quar- 
ter of a million in the two days. 

Attendance at some specific the- 
aters was up, notably at the Loew 
Theaters where "Stage Door Can- 
teen" was having its initial showing. 

Cleveland First-Run Biz 
Rises 40%; Holiday Aids 

Cleveland — Local first-runs piled 
up the biggest grosses on record dur- 
ing the week just ended. Business 
was up approximately 40 per cent. 
''Stage Door Canteen" held so strong 
in its second week at Loew's State 
that a 20-year precedent was broken 
by holding it over for a third week. 
"Bombardier" and "This Land is 
Mine" were also big box-office boost- 
ers. A rainy Fourth of July Sunday 
was largely responsible for the big 
"takes" all down the first-run line. 



Disney Shipping Record 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — An all-time high of 
34,899 feet of film was shipped by 
the Dsiney studio during June. Fig- 
ure is only 2,312 feet less than the 
entire 1932 output for the plant. 



DATE BOOK 



July 12-14: RKO Radio sales meeting, Waldorf- 
Astoria. 

July 13-14: Republic regional, New York A. C. 

July 14-15: Conference Board of National Con- 
ference of the Entertainment Industry for 
War Activities meets at Actors Equity. 

July 14-17: Paramount semi-annual sales meet- 
ing, Hotel Pierre. 

July 15-17: Warner' regional sales meeting, 
San Francisco. 

July 16: WAC committees' conference, Hotel 
Astor. 

July 16-17: Republic regional, Drake Hotel, 
Chicago. 

July 19: Sydney Samson testimonial, Hotel 
Statler, Buffalo. 

July 22-23: Republic regional, North Holly- 
wood studios. 

July 28-29: Kansas-Missouri Theaters Association 

convention, Kansas City. 
July 29: Loew's stockholders special meeting, 

home office. 
Aug. 11-12: Allied board meeting, Baltimore. 
Sept. 9: ITOA installation luncheon, Hotel 

Astor. 
Sept. 15: First Fall meeting of Ampa. 



Universal Hosts Press 
At Cocktail, Dinner Party 

Universal played host to the press 
at the Hotel Astor last night at a 
cocktail party and dinner for Felix 
Jackson, producer, and Frank Ryan, 
director, of "Hers to Hold," the new 
Deanna Durbin film. 

Among those attending were 
Aileen Creelman, John Stuart, Leo 
Mishkin, Jack Alicoate, Hank Linet, 
Chick Lewis, Alton Cook, Don M. 
Mersereau, James Cunningham, Tom 
Wenning, Chester B. Bahn, Inga 
Arvad, Sherman A. Kane, Jane Cor- 
by, Bill Formby, Abel Green, George 
H. Morris, Al Horwitz, Leo Solo- 
man, Jean Megan, Oscar Doob, Lou 
Pelegrine, Archer Winston, Al Pi- 
coult, Bob Hussey, Ernest Emerling, 
Lloyd Seidman, Charles Moss and 
Maurice Bergman. 

A preview of the picture at Loew's 
Sheridan Theater followed the din- 



Curfew Ordinance Vote 
In Gary, Ind., Monday 



Gary, Ind. — City Council next 
Monday is slated to act on a cur- 
few ordinance designed to keep chil- 
dren off the streets after 10 p.m. 



First JUA Cagney Pic 
Slated for Capitol 

First William Cagney Prod, pic 
for United Artists distribution, 
"Johnny Come Lately," starring 
Jimmy Cagney, is expected to open 
at the Capitol on Broadway some- 
time in August, probably late in the 
month, it was reported yesterday. 
Also said set for the Capitol is the 
Andrew Stone Prod, pic, "Hi Did- 
dle Diddle," which will immediately 
precede the Cagney opus, it is under- 
stood. 



To all Men, Greetings! 

(The RKO Radio Convention "Gang") 

VVhot a great country is this Democracy of ours, — 
where you and we, even in wartime, can talk freely, 
one to another! 



VvG of Edward A. Golden Productions are particu- 
larly happy to say, publicly and most sincerely, how 
much we appreciate the skilled and unflagging ef- 
forts of you, the distribution and promotional forces of 
RKO Radio, who so successfully sold and publicized 
"Hitler's Children," and made it one of the top 
grossersof the year. 



Join July 
Shangri-La 
War Stamp 
Drive! 



I O you we tip our hats, humbly and thankfully. We 
are proud of our association with all of you in RKO 
Radio, and are inspired in the planning of future 
Golden Productions by your good-will and energetic 
accomplishments. 

iGS, "Hitler's Children" is but the forerunner of 
other good things to come, — the greatest of which is 
bound to be the Victory for which all of us are so earn- 
estly striving. 



/^^^y Q jc^Ca^ ^UJ\~^~ J^X1±^ 








EDWARD A. GOLDEN PRODUCTIONS 



ix to MakefWorid America-ConscMOu*z--OdIum 

DO NOT REMOTE HH \^0^ 



O NOT 

THE 



Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 




(Sec Column 1 Below) 



The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



? DAILY- 



^__JL. 84, NO. 9 



NEW YORK, WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 1943 



TEN CENTS 



RKO ANNOUNCES 40 JTATURES, 171JH0RTS 

More Chi. Men Facing Film Extortion Indictment 



Superseding True Bill to 
Be Returned By Sept. 7; 
Grand Jury Still Meeting 

The special Federal grand jury 
which has heen investigating al- 
leged racketeering in the film indus- 
try is still in session and is ex- 
pected to file a superseding indict- 
ment naming additional Chicago la- 
bor leaders and racketeers. This 
was revealed in New York Federal 
Court yesterday. 

The new true bill is expected to 

{Continued on Page 17) 



Greater Opportunity 
With Peace-Odium 



"I think the motion picture indus- 
try will have greater opportunities 
after the war than in the past." 

Floyd B. Odium, RKO Corp. board 
chairman, and president of Atlas 
Corp., offered that forecast of the 
{Continued on Page 14) 

Alexander Sees Blow to Pix 
In Post-War U. S. Isolation 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Post-war isolation of the United 
States, or any trend in that direc- 
tion, would be a catastrophic blow 

(Continued on Page 17) 



Mo. Solons Kill Bill 
Banning Divorce Pix 

Jefferson City, Mo. — A bill which 
would have prevented the showing 
in Missouri of any motion picture 
in which any of the participating 
players had been divorced or which 
carried a court room scene touching 
on a divorce suit or that even in- 
dicated in anyway that a divorce was 
part of the film story has been 
killed by a House of Representatives 
Committee. 

Another bill that has met defeat 
was the one which would have forced 
all theaters, and other places of pub- 
lic assembly or service to throw 
open their doors and facilities to 
Negroes and persons of other colored 
races on the same basis as whites. 



RODGERS CALLS DISTRICT PARLEY 

Metro Home Office Execs, to Huddle with Managers 
in Chicago for Three Days, Starting Sunday 



Metro's district managers will 
meet with home office sales depart- 
ment executives at the Blackstone 
Hotel, Chi- _ 
cago, next" 
Sunday to be- 
gin a three- 
d a y session 
preparatory 
to start work 
on a nation- 
wide analysis 
of M-G-M ac- 
counts. 

Sales man- 
agers, headed 
b v William F. 
Rodgers, 
vice - presi- 
dent and gen- 
eral sales manager of Loew's will 




WILLIAM F. RODCERS 



confer with the district managers on 
steps to be taken to carry out the 
formula prepared at Cincinnati, 
where the first survey was made 
last week. Opening session will con- 
vene Sunday morning and meetings 
will continue through Monday and 
Tuesday, with individual discussion 
of specific problems to follow the 
general sessions. 

In addition to Rodgers, the fol- 
lowing from the home office will be 
on the dais at Chicago: E. M. Saund- 
ers, assistant general sales man- 
ager; E. K. "Ted" O'Shea, Eastern 
division sales manager; H. M. 
Richey, assistant to Rodgers in 
charge of exhibitor relations; A. F. 
Cummings, branch operations man- 
ager; Edwin W. Aaron, circuit sales 

(Continued on Page 17) 



Cairo House to WB 
Cues Post-War Plan! 



Cairo (By Cable) — Accepted here 
as evidence that American film com- 
panies plan substantial investment 
in theaters overseas in the post-war 
period, Warners have acquired the 
Opera Theater, 1,650-seater. 



Robert Schless, Warners' general 
foreign manager, confirmed yester- 
day that Warners has taken over the 

(Continued on Page 17) 



Trade Man as Liaison 
Between OWI-Pix! 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Selection of an in- 
dustry figure to serve as liaison be- 
tween the OWI and the industry — 
taking over in part the functions of 
the defunct OWI domestic motion 
picture bureau — seemed probable 
here yesterday. Tomorrow's meeting 
in New York between industry lead- 
ers and OWI Director Elmer Davis 

(Continued on Page 13) 



Rep. Gross At All-Time High 

Roers Pix Biz in 100% Gain, Confab Told 



Polio Outbreak Decreases 
Texas Grosses by 25 P. C. 



Dallas — Polio of epidemic propor- 
tions has taken heavy toll of box- 
offices in the Dallas and Fort Worth 
areas and caused uneasiness in Waco, 
Austin, San Antonio, Houston, and 
(Continued on Page 17) 



Republic's gross business stands 
at an all-time high, while gross re- 
ceipts on Roy Rogers' big-budget 
specials have hit 100 per cent above 
last year, the company's quarterly 
sales conference was told yesterday 
at the New York A. C. 

Biz progress of the company was 
traced by Herbert J. Yates and by 
(Continued on Page 17) 



Convention Delegates Hear 
Depinet Outline Program 
For 1943-1944 Season 



RKO Radio Pictures schedules 40 
or more features and 171 short sub- 
jects for the 1943-44 season, Ned E. 
Depinet, presi- 
dent, yesterday 
told delegates to 
the annual sales 
meeting at the 
Waldorf - As- 
toria. All but 
two of the fea- 
tures will be 
made in this 
country with 
some of the im- 
portant films 
scheduled to 
come from inde- 
pendent produc- 
e r s including 
Samuel Gold- 
wyn, Walt Dis- 
Herbert Wilcox, 




NED E. DEPINET 



ney, Sol Lesser, 



(Continued on Page 14) 



Show World Leaders 
At NEIC Conference 



Leaders in every branch of the 
show wo: Id will gather at the Wal- 
dorf-Astoria this morning when the 
National Entertainment I n d u st r y 
Council set-up to serve as a clear- 
ing house for agencies providing en- 
tertainment to boost morale in the 
armed forces and on the home front, 

(Continued on Page 13) 



No Film Monopoly to 
Be Permitted in U. K. 

London (By Cable) — The question 
of film monopoly being raised in the 
House of Commons, as a result of 
the expansion of the theater and 
film interests of J. Arthur Rank, a 
statement was made that the Govern- 
ment could not acquiesce in "the 
creation of anything like a mono- 
poly" in theaters or in the produc- 
tion, distribution or exhibition of 
films. 



THE 



'**- DAILY 



Wednesday, July 14, 1943 




Vol. 84, No. 9 Wed., July 14, 1943 10 Cents 



JOHN W. ALICOATE 



: Publisher 



DONALD M. MERSEREAU : General Manager 
CHESTER B. BAHN :::::: Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address- 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco-Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



FINANCIAL 



(Tuesday, July 13) 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat 17 16% 17 + V* 

Col. Picts. vtc. (2i/ 2 % > 18'/ 4 18 I8I/4+ l/ 4 

Columbia Picts. pfd 

Con. Fm. Ind 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd 

East. Kodak 165'/ 2 1647/ 8 165'/ 2 + Vi 

Cen. Prec. Eq 23 1/4 22% 23% + % 

Loew's, Inc 623/ 8 62 62% + % 

Paramount 30 29% 29% + % 

RKO 9% 91/2 95/ 8 + % 

RKO $6 pfd 971/2 97% 971/2 

20th Century-Fox . . . 23% 23 23 — 1/4 
20th Century-Fox pfd. 34 33% 34 + % 

Univ. Pict. pfd 

Warner Bros 15% 15% 15% 

do pfd 

89 13-32 89 13-32 8913-32 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Para. B'way 3s55 

Para. Picts. deb. 4s56 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Monogram Picts 3% 3% 3% — % 

Radio-Keith cvs 2 17/ 8 2 

Sonotone Corp 3% 3% 3% + % 

Technicolor 14% 13% 14 + 3/ 4 

Trans-Lux 3% 3 3% 

Universal Picts 19 18% 18%— % 



"Canteen" Tops Army's 
B. O. Business in June 



Ace box office hit in Army motion 
picture theaters in June was UA's 
"Stage Door Canteen," it was an- 
nounced yesterday by Fred Bund, Jr., 
assistant director of the Army Mo- 
tion Picture Service. 

Other four outstanding features of 
the month from a box-office stand- 
point were, in order, "Coney Island," 
20th-Fox; "Bataan," Loew's; "Aerial 
Gunner," Paramount, and "Action in 
the No - th Atlantic," Warners. 

It's the first time that the Army 
list showed only one "escapist" pic 
registering. 



"Bell Tolls" in Formal 
Bow Tonight at Rivoli 



Para.'s "For Whom the Bell Tolls" 
bows in formally at the Rivoli to- 
night as a benefit for the National 
War Fund in the wake of last night's 
press preview. Theater has been 
closed for two days to prepare for 
the premiere, including the installa- 
tion of 100-foot front that covers 
the building from sidewalk to roof. 
Idea for the front was developed by 
Alec Moss; design is by Howard Bay. 

Ranking Army and Navy officers, 
persons prominent in society, civic 
leaders and key figures in industry, 
the arts, business and finance will 
make up the world premiere audi- 
ence. 

Here from Hollywood for the opening' are 
B. G. DeSylva, Paramount executive produc- 
er; Sam Wood, producer-director of "For 
Whom the Bell Tolls," Dorothy Lamour, and 
her husband, Capt. William R. Howard, III; 
Betty Hutton and Mary Martin, both Para- 
mount stars; William H. Pine, Paramount 
producer, and others. 

Also present will be Barney Balaban, Stan- 
ton Griffis, Chester Colby, Wendell L. Willkie, 
N. Peter Rathvon, Floyd Odium, Maurice 
Newton, Edwin L. Weisl, Spyros P. Skouras, 
Nicholas M. Schenck, Jack Cohn, John D. 
Hertz, Stephen Callagrhan, A. Conger Good- 
year, Earl I. McClintock, Charles Francis 
Coe, William Phillips, George Skouras, Eugene 
Stetson, John Hertz, Jr., G. L. Porter, Serge 
Semenenko, Claude Lee, Francis S. Harmon. 



Para. Lab. Workers Pay 
Boost Okayed by WLB 

Motion Picture Laboratory Techni- 
cians' Union, Local 702, IATSE, has 
received WLB approval of wage in- 
creases for workers at the Para- 
mount Laboratory in Astoria, it was 
reported yesterday by John Franca- 
villa, president of the union. The 
increases, which are retroactive to 
March 8, 1943, are 10 per cent for 
those making less than $50 per week 
and five per cent for those earning 
$50 or more. The raises were pro- 
vided for under the terms of the 
union's contract with the laboratory 
running to March 10, 1945. 

Several other applications for 
wage increases are pending before 
the WLB. Among the firms involved 
are Warners, Pathe, and Paramount 
News. 



Espy Joining M. Selznick 
Agency as General Mgr. 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Reeves Espy is join- 
ing the Myron Selznick agency as 
general manager, succeeding Charles 
Glett, who has entered the Signal 
Corps as a major. Espy has re- 
signed as assistant story editor at 
M-G-M to take the new post. 



William S. Shartin Joins 
United Artists Sales Dept. 

Chicago — William S. Shartin, who 
recently resigned as Warners Mid- 
west district manager, is joining 
United Artists sales department, ac- 
cording to Rud Lohrenz, local dis- 
trict manager. 



Charles Morrison Here 
For Talks with Walker 



Charles Morrison, currently in 
New York in connection with organi- 
zation of his new producing organi- 
zation, Morrison Film Co., expressed 
the hope that James J. Walker, for- 
mer Mayor of New York and film 
industry leader, would accept the 
presidency of the new venture. 

Characterizing Walker as unsur- 
passed in ability as well as under- 
standing of industry affairs, Morri- 
son stated that "it is worth forming 
a company to get Jimmy back in the 
business more actively," and added 
that he believed that the only bar- 
rier standing in the way of Walker's 
acceptance of the offer is the "in- 
tense loyalty he has to the indepen- 
dent theater owners whom he now 
is representing, and the garment in- 
dustry." 

Morrison hinted that he has several 
top-flight screen properties which 
will be put in production upon com- 
pletion of his plans to organize Mor- 
rison Film Co. 



Goldberg Asks Protection 
For Baltimore's Hilton 



In an unusual clearance complaint 
filed with the Washington tribunal, 
Thomas D. Goldberg asks that clear- 
ance granted the Forest and Gwynn 
Theaters, Baltimore, over his Balti- 
more house, the Hilton, be eliminated 
and that protection be granted the 
Hilton over the other theaters. Com- 
plaint was filed by Hilton Theater 
Co. as operator of the Hilton and 
names 20th Century-Fox and Forest 
Park Theater Co., operator of the 
Forest and Gwynn. 

Harford Theater Co., a Goldberg 
company, has also filed a clearance 
complaint naming 20th-Fox and the 
Boulevard and Waverly Theaters, 
operated by State Theater Co. Ac- 
tion asks elimination of the present 
14-day clearance enjoyed by the 
Boulevard and Waverly over the Har- 
ford. 



Two Film Industry Men 
Called for Cuban Army 

Havana (By Air Mail, Passed by 
Censor) — Only two film industry men 
were called when the National Re- 
cruiting Board summoned over 3,000 
men between 20 and 25 years of age, 
for military training in the Cuban 
Army. L. Villanueva, son of the 
manager of the Modernista and Marti 
Theaters, Cardenas and Lilo Yarson, 
actor who appears in "For Whom the 
Bell Tolls," were called. 




1560 
Broadway 



COMinG and G0II1G 



LOUIS W. SCHINE and J. MEYER SCHINE 
are in New York from Gloversville for the RKO 
Radio convention. 

RUBE JACKTER, Columbia's assistant general 
sales manager, leaves today for Washington and 
will return to New York over the week-end. 

CUS W. LAMPE. Schine division manager, is 
attending the RKO Radio sales meeting here. 

AL 0. BONDY, film distributor for Geri^ ., 
Electric Co., left his local headquarters yWk 
terday for Schenectady on business. 

MRS. EDWARD RAFTERY, wife of UA's prexy, 
was in Chicago yesterday. 

HARRY UNTERFORT, RKO-Schine city manager 
in Syracuse, is a guest at the RKO Radio sales 
conclave. 

JAY GOLDEN of the RKO-Paramount-Comer- 
ford pool, Rochester, is in New York attending 
the RKO convention. 

JIM BRENNAN, Schine district manager, is at- 
tending the RKO Radio sales sessions here. 



Alexander Preview Shuts 
Down for the Duration 



Alexander Preview Co., associate 
organization of Alexander Film Co., 
but not a subsidiary of the latter, 
has ceased operations for the dura- 
tion because of the raw stock short- 
age, it was revealed yesterday by 
J. Don Alexander, whose son, J. 
Don Alexander, Jr., is head of Alex- 
ander Preview. 

The move in no way effects Alex- 
ander Film Co., it was stressed. 

Preview has, since its inception 
a few years ago, devoted its facili- 
ties to the making of "coming at- 
traction" films, and during its exist- 
ence has sold an estimated $40,000,- 
000 worth of such trailers. 



44 Canadian Theater 
Fires, $146,611 Damage 

Toronto — No lives were lost 
through fire in Canadian theaters 
during 1942, it is reported by the 
Dominion Fire Commissioner. Dur- 
ing the year there were 44 fires 
causing damages totaling $146,611. 
Ten of these broke out in projec- 
tion rooms. 



Gilmore Retiring Sept. 1 

Harry B. Gilmore, secretary of 
the Western Electric will retire Sept. 
1 after 41 years of service, it was 
announced yesterday following a 
meeting of the Company's directors. 
Norman R. Frame, assistant secre- 
tary was elected secretary by the 
directors to succeed Gilmore. 



HELP 



IF YOU ARE HAVING DIFFI- 
CULTY FINDING THE RIGHT 
PERSON FOR ANY VACANCY 
IN YOUR ORGANIZATION- 
CALL 
FRANK McGRANN 

POSITION SECURING BUREAU, INC. 

(AGENCY) 
331 Madison Ave. (43rd St.), N. Y. 

MUrray hill 2-6494 



This Is The Picture 




Three years ago the Paramount studio dedicated its heart, its 
hands, its hopes, to the creation of an heroic film. Nine million 
man-hours of devoted care were lavished on it. Volumes of pub- 
licity have preceded it. Now, filmed in superb Technicolor, its 
168 minutes of entertainment at last unfold upon the screen... 



These Are The dCovers 




"In spite of the things that were done to me, I never kissed any 
man until you. And now there are but three days and three 
nights — yet they're everything. Longer than the months of torture 
— longer than the years I've lived . • • There isn't anything else 
but 'now' — and we must live all our life in the time that remains." 



mamm 



This Is The e?tory 



d 




Towering high as its own craggy mountain peaks over all other 
best-sellers of this day and age. One million people bought it . „ . 
5,000,000 read it . . . To 50,000,000 spread the fame of its superb 
romance: "Nobody can write as Hemingway can of a man and a 
woman together . . .This is a book, not of three days, but of all time c 




These Are 



. . . and all the others of 
that brave, lusty, brawling, 
life-loving band who flung 
a desperate challenge in 
the face of death — against 
crushing, hopeless odds. 



Gary Cooper as Robert Jordan 

who had come to offer his life for a 
country that was far from home — 
and a cause that was near his heart. 



Ingrid Bergman as Maria 
Of the Close-Cropped Hair 

"I do not know how to kiss, or I would 
kiss you — and I shall learn to kiss 
you very well." 




The People 




Akim Tamiroff as Pablo 

"Pablo was brave in the beginning . . . 
he killed more people than the cholera. 
But now he is finished. He is very 
much a coward and he will betray us all." 




Arturo de Cordova as Agustin 

"It is better to die on your feet than 
to live on your knees." 




Katina Paxinou as Pilar 

'She is of an unbelievable barbarous- 
ness,with a tongue that bites like a bull 
whip . . . She would have made a good 
man — but she is all woman, and all ugly." 




Joseph Calleia as El Sordo 

"Whether one has fear of it or not, 
one's death is difficult to accept . . . 
even at fifty-two, with three wounds 
in you, and surrounded on a hill.' 



This Is The 










■■■-■. --^ 



For them the bridge was everything. For three breathless days 
their every thought, their every movement was consecrated to its 
destruction. And then — "there was a cracking roar and the middle 
of the bridge rose up in the air like a wave breaking, and they 
felt the blast of the explosion roll back against them ..." 



K99I 



These Are The eocenes 

THAT HELP FILL THE SCREEN WITH TUMULTUOUS 
ACTION AND TIGHT-LIPPED SUSPENSE 



a* * 



%*& i 



w* 




% ^~» 

** 



; -nfchi 



M ™> * 



)!«• 




,, , 



HP 41 



*r*3 



-- ?■ -^ "fife? 



jt^K^ 



i 




The Siege on the Mountain Top 



' LJ. 



■<J (•HfY-. 



L \t-i*" j&$3f' >-V 




■MVaiti 




i~.~. 


"^flfijfc * 1 I-- 


1 BW 


at j» % ■ 






i 




.-, 




■ 


-afW -1 





The Massacre at the Cliflp 



;>-. 



V 



.*«. 



iL i r ' ■ ' 







I 






»^:i J 



The Bombing of the Cafe 



The Defense of the Cave 




This Is 




ParamoV 





v>v>v> 



From the Celebrated N< 



Starring 

Gary £ooper 



PRODUCED AND DIRECTED BY 



SamW 






DM "DBSM!* 

w,» AKIM TAMIROFF • ARTURO de CORDOV 



Screen Play I 



The Silling 




Bl by Ernest Hemingway 



1 



er£man 



gridS 

30Cl B * G " De SYLVA ' Executive Producer 

S©k@C3 

(JOSEPH CALLEIA • And KATINA PAXINOU 

kidley Nichols 






J 



All America helped cast the most famous characters in modern fiction. There 
are one hundred individual roles, and among them new stars emerge and famous 
players attain a brilliance that will be recorded in motion picture annals. 
The production, direction, and writing enlisted leading talents of the him 
world. The grandeur of Technicolor in this picture has never been equalled. 




This Is The Policy 1 

THAT WILL BRING MAXIMUM RETURNS FROM THIS TREMENDOUS 
PROPERTY TO THE BOX-OFFICES OF THE LAND 

$4.40 WORLD PREMIERE, RIVOLI THEATRE, NEW YORK, JULY 14 

To be followed by 

RESERVED-SEAT RIVOLI THEATRE ROADSHOW ENGAGEMENT 

To be followed by 

RESERVED-SEAT CARTHAY CIRCLE THEATRE, HOLLYWOOD, ROADSHOW ENGAGEMENT 
UNITED ARTISTS THEATRE, LOS ANGELES, ROADSHOW ENGAGEMENT 

To be followed by 

OTHER METROPOLITAN CITY ROADSHOW ENGAGEMENTS DURING AUGUST AND SEPTEMBER 

To be followed by 

SELECTED PRE-RELEASE KEY CITY JR0ADSH0W ENGAGEMENTS OCTOBER 1st 

To be followed by 

NATIONAL ROADSHOW ENGAGEMENTS DURING 1943-44 

To be followed by \. 

RETURN ENGAGEMENTS FOR YEARS TO COME " 







*For the Benefit of The National War F 



This Is The Company 

THAT IS MAKING MOTION PICTURE HISTORY— 




aramsunt 



Wednesday, July 14, 1943 






DAJLV 



13 



Show World Leaders 
Al NEK Conference 



9 



(Continued from Page 1) 

will meet for the first time to adopt 
plans for complete mobilization of 
the amusement business in the in- 
terests of victory over the Axis. The 

pnference will run through tomor- 
w. 

Representatives of 36 major na- 
tional organizations in the entertain- 
ment world will hear Brig.-Gen. 
Frederick Henry Osborn, chief of 
the Morale Branch of the Army, tell 
of the entertainment requirements of 
men and women in uniform. Theo- 
dore W. Gamble, director of the War 
Finance Committee of the Treasury 
Department, will talk on what show 
business can do to aid the Govern- 
ment in the coming war loan drive. 
Winthrop Aldrich will speak on the 
role of the entertainer in the future 
plans of the National War Fund, of 
which he is chairman. The highlight 
of the second day of the meeting will 
be a discussion of civilian morale and 
entertainment on the home front by 
Elmer Davis, OWI director. 

Also listed on the agenda is a dis- 
cussion of a pledge by members of 
every branch of the entertainment 
world to dedicate themselves to a 
greatly stepped-up program of enter- 
tainment to aid in the winning of the 
war. Other business of the meeting 
will be completion of a permanent 
organizational set-up for the NEIC 
in New York and other major enter- 
tainment centers. 

The idea of the NEIC, which will 
function as a service agency to chan- 
nel talent and facilities to points 
where they can best be used, grew 
out of a conference held at the Times 
Hall on June 3 and 4. 

The continuations committee ap- 
pointed at that time with George J. 
Schaefer, chairman of the WAC, as 
chairman will place before the show 
world representatives the results of 
its planning activities in behalf of 
fuller dedication of the amusement 
field to the war effort. 



"Canteen" in Fourth Week 

"Stage Door Canteen," which 
starts a fourth week tomorrow at 
the New York Capitol, is expected 
to go at least eight weeks there, it 
is understood. 




George Blake 



M. J. Siegel 

Dave Fleischer 

Charles Weinstein 

Stuart Stewart 

Zita Johann 



ALONG 



THE 




- |u™iinTTi 

Conventional Jottings: 

• • • TODAY marks "the end of the beginning." which is to say 
the current RKO Radio sales convention in the swank Waldorf-Astoria 

From this point on, the company and its distribution legions will 

buckle down to the task of making the 1943-44 season a humdinger, and 

there isn't a single official or delegate but that is certain it will be 

Yes'day. Phil M. swooped down on the big Park Avenue hostelry to 
chew the trade fat with some of the boys as they headed for their noon- 
tide menu fat It was good to see Al Selig again, up from down 

Pittsburgh and Washington way Al says that the perfect omen for 

some of the on-coming RKO Radio features occurred right while Ned 
Depinet was announcing the new lineup, — for darned if Oscar didn't 

poke his head in the convention hall door right then Both the 

morning and afternoon biz sessions were downright private, but Phil 
M.'s little nooze hound, "Snooper," managed to slither into the sessions 
and emerged with the following barking: 

T T T 

• • • COLONEL Carlos P. Romulo, present at the gallant last 
stand of General MacArthur in the Philippines, as the latter's chief 
aide, took a bow and received a spirited ovation The Grand Ball- 
room's unavailability this year to the RKO sales meet, by the by, 
necessitated the announcement of 1943-44 product being staged in the 

hotel's Wedgewood Room,— and to an overflow audience Distaff 

RKO-ites at the sales meeting were the alluring Rosalie Ross, of Rutgers 
Neilson's staff, and the charming Mildred Hartman of Aagie Schubart's 

department They worked like beavers outside the Sert Room, 

where the publicity typewriters hummed in the best City Room fashion 
RKO Radio, so Ned Depinet disclosed, has six Tim Holt west- 
erns now available for immediate dating by exhibs Tim com- 
pleted these half-dozen pix prior to his induction into Uncle Sammy's 

Army several months ago They'll be the only horse operas the 

org will have in the new season 

T T T 

• • • ANENT Prexy Ned, — he invited ye delegates to an open 
house tomorrow at GHQ, specifically the office of "Flash," house organ 

bailiwick GHQ was established by Salute's Jack (Ole Goose-Caller) 

Level as a clearing house for nooze of RKO-ites now in the armed forces 

lames R. Young, the Far East correspondent whose book, "Behind 

the Rising Sun," is destined to be one of RKO's best bets of the season, 
gave an off-the-record broadside about inside Japan Jimmy, vet- 
eran member o' the Fourth Estate, is a whale of a speaker N. Peter 

Rathvon. introducing his school pal, Floyd B. Odium, to the sales dele- 
gates, recalled that when they were schoolmates at the University of 
Colorado, Odium already had a keen financial flare, evidenced in his 
poker pickings, and his facility in getting elected to college committees 

with stipendiary privileges Capt. Ben Lyon held a reunion with his 

pals of the Phil Reisman foreign department staff Corporal Patricia 

Biddle of the WACs. formerly of the studio, dropped in to say hello, 

and chatted with her former boss. Perry Lieber Terry Turner, in 

charge of field exploitation under S. Barret McCormick, was able to see 

his staff en masse for the first time Spread all over the country, 

Terry has hitherto seen 'em singly or in pairs Cables of greetings 

to the delegates were read by Ned Depinet from branch managers in 
such scattered spots as Barcelona, Cairo, San Juan, P. R., Bombay, 
Stockholm, Chungking, Lisbon, London and Berne, — testimony to the fact 

that RKO carries on! P.S.: Good luck to you all, lads! And be 

sure to always 

T T ▼ 

AVENGE PEARL HARBOR! 



Trade Man as Liaison 
Between OWI-Pix! 



(.Continued from Page 1) 

and Domestic Director Palmer Hoyt 
will probably see an offer by OWI 
to let the industry pick a man to 
carry on this work. 

Organizationally the future OWI 
industry liaison is pretty much of 
an open question, but it was learned 
that there will probably be a Holly- 
wood office apart from that of Ulric 
Bell, who represents the overseas 
branch. The main reason for this 
would be that the agency does not 
want to leave itself open to charges 
of censorship, since the overseas 
branch does exercise censorship, in 
effect. 

Bell's office, were it to take over the 
script clearance work formerly handled by 
Nelson Poynter, Mellett representative on 
the Coast, could find itself in a difficult po- 
sition if it rejected a script for overseas 
showing: because it could be charged that 
OWI was trying: to censor it for domestic 
purposes. 

Furthermore, clearing- of scripts for do- 
mestic purposes is probably a thing of the 
past. Officials here believe that the industry 
is not keen on this clearance, and they hope 
to have a man in Hollywood who would not 
find it necessary to work that way to ac- 
complish his ends. They hope to have a 
man in whom the industry has complete 
confidence to do an affirmative job there — 
suggesting information needs and providing 
background information for the studios. It 
is not unlikely that the same man will 
serve both in Washington and in Hollywood. 

OWI officials, if they have the man in 
mind, have been quite successful in non- 
cealing his identity. It is likely that they 
hope for the industry leaders to name the 
man. 

Arch A. Mercy, who has been assistant 
chief of the motion picture bureau under 
Lowell Mellett, will probably be on the 
scene for a time yet, having offered to stay 
to help liquidate the bureau. His future 
plans are believed to call for his accepting 
a post with the Army. 



News Agencies Cover 
'Roger Touhy' Prison Show 



A big turn-out of Illinois law-en- 
forcement officers, newspaper corre- 
spondents and photographers, mag- 
azine writers and such national news 
agencies as the AP, UP and INS, 
totaling nearly 1,000 covered the 
Stateville Penitentiary preview 
showing of 20th-Fox's "Roger Touhy, 
Gangstei" in Joliet, 111., last night, 
Jack Goldstein, Eastern publicity di- 
rector for 20th-Fox reported last 
night upon his return by plane to 
New York. 



"Weather" at Roxy July 21 

Twentieth-Fox's "Stormy Weather" 
follows "Coney Island" into the Roxy 
on July 21. 



WEDDING BELLS 



Geraldine Hucka, now a store- 
keeper in the WAVES and formerly 
with 20th Century-Fox exchange in 
Des Moines, was married to Lt. Rob- 
ert Jon Evans in Jacksonville, Fla. 
She is stationed at Jacksonville. 



14 



Wednesday, July 14, 1943 



RK0 1943-44 Program to Stress Original Stories 



Five Features in Techni- 
color; New Series Added 
To New Season's Lineup 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Frank Ross and Edward A. Golden. 
Five of the new season's pictures 
are completed and eight are in pro- 
duction. 

Commenting on the program, N. 
Peter Rathvon, president of RKO 
Corp. said, "Our 1943-44 product 
represents a careful selection which 
, we think the public will find of un- 
usual appeal. It is diversified and 
attractive, balanced between the ser- 
ious themes of our times and the 
gay comedies and musicals that are 
a tonic entertainment necessity to- 
day." 

Five to be in Technicolor 

Most of the program will be based 
on originals, three on magazine sto- 
ries, four on books and one on a 
play. Five features are to be filmed 
in Technicolor, in addition to all of 
the Disney releases. 

Top pictures to be produced at the 
RKO lots in Hollywood and Culver 
City under direction of Charles W. 
Koerner, include Ginger Rogers in 
"Tender Comrade," to be produced 
by David Hempstead from Dalton 
Trumbo's original story, and "The 
Gibson Girl," which Hempstead will 
produce in Technicolor. Fred As- 
taire and Joan Leslie will be starred 
in a musical while Cary Grant will 
head the cast of "Experiment Peril- 
ous," from the Margaret Carpenter 
best seller, also produced by Hemp- 
stead. 

Frank Ross Productions will make 
"The Robe," in Technicolor, from 
Lloyd C. Douglas' best seller. "Gov- 
ernment Girl," directed by Dudley 
Nichols from his own script adapted 
from the Adela Rogers St. John 
Ladies' Home Journal serial, will 
have Anne Shirley, James Dunn, 
Paul Stewart, Jess Barker, Una 
O'Connor and Harry Davenport in 
the cast. Edward Dmytryk will di- 
rect "Behind the Rising Sun" from 
Emmett Lavery's screenplay based 
on the book by James R. Young for- 
leign correspondent imprisoned by 
the Japs, with a cast featuring 
Margo, Tom Neal, J. Carrol Naish, 
Robert Ryan and Gloria Holden. 

Ross has completed the Jean Ar- 
thur-John Wayne starrer, "A Lady 
Takes a Chance" and will follow 
with "One Girl in a Million," also 
starring Miss Arthur. Eddie Cantor 
will produce and star in "Show Busi- 
ness" with a cast including Joan 
Davis, Frank Sinatra, Marcy Mc- 



Perfect Timing! 

West Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Just as the Yanks and 
their allies were invading "Sicily," 
the Warners' studio was starting to 
make an Italian-language version of 
"Sergeant York." 



Abandoned Child's Adoption by Variety Club 

Hailed by Capital District as Capital Deed 

Albany — Top current topic among press and public here is the adoption by 
the local Variety Club of a three-year-old child left on the doorstep of St. 
Joseph's Church, a note pinned to his coat by the mother who wrote that she 
could no longer care for him. Little lad's adoption has driven home to Albanians 
at large the humanitarian work of the Variety Club and the great -heartedness 
of its showman members. Chief Barker C. J. Latta declares: "When we took 
over the financing and operation of the USO Club Canteen, we thought this was 
the biggest undertaking we have tackled. The adoption of the child has gained 
the greatest good-will that we have ever experienced in this community. It is 
planted in the minds of the public that the movie industry is doing considerable 
good work for the community as a whole." 



Guire, Dooley Wilson and others to 
be announced. 

Company's initial Bing Crosby 
feature will be "Down Melody Lane," 
to be produced by Hempstead who 
will also guide "Nurse Sister Ken- 
ny," to star Rosalind Russell. "One 
Hour of Glory" to be produced by 
Casey Robinson from his own script, 
will introduce the ballerina Touma- 
nova and Gregory Peck, star of 
Broadway. Jacques Tourneur will 
direct. 

Maureen O'Hara in Two 

Maureen O'Hara will be co-starred 
in two — with John Garfield in "Fal- 
len Sparrow" from Dorothy B. 
Hughes' best seller, and with John 
Wayne in "Tall in the Saddle," from 
Gordon Ray Young's magazine ser- 
ial. Robert Fellows will produce 
both. 

Fellows will also produce two starring Pat 
O'Brien — "The Iron Major," based on the 
life of the late Maj. Frank Cavanaugh, and 
"Marine Raiders." "Around the World" 
stars Kay Kyser with Mischa Auer, Joan 
Davis, Marcy McGuire, and Georgia Carroll, 
with Allan Dwan as producer-director. 
"Higher and Higher" features Michele Mor- 
gan, Jack Haley, Constance Moore, Marcy 
McGuire, Frank Sinatra, Paul and Grace 
Hartman, Leon Errol and Mel Torme, with 
production and direction by Tim Whelan. 

Fibber McGee and Molly are to be starred 
in "Heavenly Days," a Robert Fellows pro- 
duction, directed by Richard Wallace. Pearl 
Buck's "China Sky" will be produced by 
Emmet Lavery with a cast headed by Mau- 
reen O'Hara, Paul Henreid and Luise Rainer. 

Wally Brown and Alan Carney will be 
featured in a new Army life series produced 
by Bert Gilroy. First of this group will be 
"Adventures of a Rookie," directed by Les- 
lie Goodwins with Margaret Landry, Patti 
Brill and Richard Martin in the cast. Others 
will be "The Rookies in Burma" and "The 
Rookies in Berlin." Another new series, 
"Mr. and Mrs. America," will star Leon 
Errol. The Falcon, Gildersleeve and Lum 'n' 
Abner series will be continued. 

Geraghty on "Falcon" 

First of two Falcons to be produced by 
Maurice Geraghty, will be "The Falcon and 
the Co-ed," featuring Tom Conway. Harold 
Peary will, star in two Gildersleeves, "Gil- 
dersleeve on Broadway" and "Gildersleeve, 
Detective." both produced by Herman Schlom. 

"Are These Our Children?" will be pro- 
duced by Val Lewton with direction by As- 
sociate Prpducer Edward Dmytryk. "Seven 
Days Ashore" features Marcy McGuire, Fred- 
rie Slack and band, and Dooley Wilson, di- 
rected by John Auer. "An American Story" 
stars Margo, with Wally Brown, Alan Car- 
ney, John Carradine, Robert Ryan, Amelita 
Ward and James Bell, from Arch Oboler's 
script, produced and directed by Auer. 

Val Lewton will produce a twin-bill of 
four-reel features, "The Amorous Ghost" and 
"The Screaming Skull." Lewton's schedule 
also includes "The Curse of the Cat People," 
featuring Simone Simon, Kent Smith and 
Jane Randolph. "Lord Epping Has Plans," 
Stars Leon Errol in a Bert Gilroy produc- 
tion; John Auer will produce "They Creep 



by Night" and "The Fanatic of Fez" (ten- 
tative title) will feature George Sanders. 
New Disney Camera Process 
Schedules of independent producers whose 
product will be released by RKO includes 
Walt Disney's "Let's Go Latin," (tentative 
title), which will introduce a new camera 
process. 

Samuel Goldwyn will supply Bob Hope in 
"Treasure Chest," in Technicolor; "North 
Star," from the Lillian Hellman original with 
a cast including Anne Baxter, Walter Bren- 
nan, Walter Huston, Dana Andrews, Ann 
Harding, Jane Withers, Farley Granger and 
Erich von Stroheim, directed by Lewis Mile- 
stone, and Danny Kaye in "Up in Arms," 
supported by Dana Andrews, Dinah Shore, 
Constance Dowling and the Goldwyn girls. 

Herbert Wilcox has already completed in 
England, "Yellow Canary," starring Anna 
Neagle and Richard Greene and another Eng- 
lish-made production, "Escape to Danger" 
will co-star Eric Portman and Ann Dvorak. 
Sol Lesser will contribute "Tarzan's Des- 
ert Mystery," starring Johnny Weissmuller. 
First of two Lum 'n' Abner productions will 
be "So This is Washington," with a sup- 
porting cast including Mildred Coles, Alan 
Mowbray and Roger Clark, with Ben Hersh 
producing and Ray MeCarey directing. Ed- 
ward Golden will produce another special. 
39 Two-Reel Shorts 
Of the 171 scheduled shorts, 142 are one- 
reelers and 29 two-reelers. Single reel 
series comprise RKO Pathe News, twice week- 
ly; 18 Walt Disney Technicolor cartoons; 13 
Sportscopes and seven Flicker Flashbacks. 
Two-reel series are "This Is America." 13; 
Edgar Kennedy and Leon Errol comedies, 
six each; and "Headliner Revivals," four 
musical comedies, two starring Phil Harris 
and band and two starring Ted Fio Rito 
and band. 

RKO producers include David Hempstead, 
Casey Robinson, Robert Fellows, Emmet 
Lavery, Eddie Cantor, Val Lewton, Bert 
Gilroy, Maurice Geraghty and Herman 
Schlom. Producer-directors include Dudley 
Nichols, Tim Whelan, Allan Dwan, John 
Auer and Herbert Wilcox. Directors: Wil- 
liam A. Seiter, Lewis Milestone, Edward H. 
Griffith, Ray Enright, Elliott Nugent, Rich- 
ard Wallace, Edward Dmytryk, Jacques Tour- 
neur, Mark Robson, Leslie Goodwins and Wil- 
liam Thiele. 

Personality roster includes Ginger Rog- 
ers, Fred Astaire, Bob Hope, Cary Grant, 
Rosalind Russell, Danny Kaye, Jean Arthur, 
Olivia de Havilland, Eddie Cantor, George 
Sanders, Bing Crosby, Simone Simon, Paul 
Henreid, Pat O'Brien, Michele Morgan, Anna 
Neagle, Luise Rainer, Maureen O'Hara, Joan 
Davis, Kay Kyser, Johnny Weissmuller, John 
Garfield. 

Also, Toumanova, Gregory Peck, Richard 
Greene, Harold Peary, Lum 'n' Abner, Wally 
Brown, Alan Carney, Joan Leslie, Ann Shir- 
ley, James Dunn, Lupe Velez, Paul Stewart, 
Jess Barker, Una O'Connor, Harry Daven- 
port, Frank Sinatra, Marcy McGuire, Dooley 
Wilson, Glenn Vernon, Alan Reed, Hugo 
Haas, Ruth Warrick, Robert Ryan, Russell 
Wade, Mischa Auer, Georgia Carroll, Jack 
Haley, Constance Moore, Paul and Grace 
Hartman, Leon Errol, Mel Torme, Margaret 
Landry, Patti Brill, Richard Martin, Tom 
Conway, Freddie Slack and band, Kim Hunter. 



Greater Opportunity 
With Peace-Odium 

(.Continued from Page 1) 
industry's post-war future in an B.f^> 
dress before the RKO Radio salW 
meeting at the Waldorf-Astoria yes-"* 
terday. 

"I think the industry has estab- 
lished itself as it never was be- 
fore," stated Odium. "There is good 
reason why people are going to the 
theater, good reason why the pic- 
ture companies are getting film to 
carry on. It is because motion pic- 
tures are filling a real need, helping 
morale, helping build up production, 
helping the men at the front, and I 
think you people here should con- 
sider yourselves helpers in this 
effort.." 

Odium declared film "will carry America 
to the world because the world will be more 
conscious of America than ever before." 

The afternoon session, climax of the 
sales meet, was given over to the 1943-44 
product announcement by President Ned E. 
Depinet. Morning session was addressed by 
Robert S. Wolff, metropolitan district man- 
ager; Robert Mochrie, general sales manager; 
Nat Levy. Eastern division sales manager 
and Walter E. Branson, Western division sales 
manager. 

Phil Reisman, RKO Radio vice-president 
in charge of foreign distribution, disclosed 
that plans are already under way for the 
presentation of pictures in European trerri- 
tories as they are freed of enemy occupa- 
tion. 



RKO Radio Sales Meeting 

To Close With NSS Buffet 

The final session of RKO Radio's 
three-day sales meeting which started 



Mrs. Catherine Reves Dies 

Detroit — Mrs. Catherine J. Reves, 
mother of Haviland F. Reves, De- 
troit correspondent of The Film 
Daily, died Sunday after several 
months' illness. She was office 
manager for her son for many years 
until illness forced her retirement. 
Interment will be in Woodmere Ceme- 
tery today. 



Monday at the Waldorf-Astoria Ho- 
tel, New York, will be called to or- 
der this morning at nine o'clock by 
Ned E. Depinet. 

Day's order of business will be de- 
voted to the new season's product as 
announced by Depinet yesterday. A 
recess will be called at 12:30 p.m. 
and the delegates will be hosted at 
lunch in the Wedgewood Room. The 
meeting will then be resumed at 2 
p.m. 

In the evening at seven p.m. the 
delegates will be guests of National 
Screen Service at a reception and 
buffet supper in the Wedgewood 
Room. The homeward return of the 
delegates to their various offices 
throughout the United States and 
Canada will begin tonight and con- 
tinue through tomorrow. 



Add "Help Wanted!" 

Sound View, Conn. — Because of 
his inability to obtain an operator, 
John P. Glackin may be unable 
to open his Summer Strand here, 
usually open by Memorial Day or 
Fourth of July at latest. 







The sensational show that exposes the 
vicious Japs as the vilest villains the world 
has ever known! . . . Sensationally pro- 
mated!. . . Opening in August. . . Make your^ 
own booking plans NOW!... 



LOOK 



see why V*£ST*n 

TO ^ JBr- ^^ JB8 ^"^Mrt^ 




They sell their 



THEY'RE WORSE THAN KILLERS! 

own daughters? mtm' 

They manhandle captive women! __^ 

They make war •"■"*£* women! Jg^fff j 

Tu e « torture W« SSI _^-m*T\«L\ I ' I 

^^ n3» II 1 1 iSLl II I IJ 

^ond * orC ' 
and MORE' 




h MARGO • TOM NEAL • J. CARROL NAISH • ROBERT RYAN • GLORIA HOLDEN 

Directed by EDWARD DMYTRYK • Original Screen Ploy by EMMET LAVERY 



MM 



Wednesday, July 14, 1943 



IN* 



if"*- 

1 Miiy 



17 



Rodgers Calls M-G-M 
District Conference 



(Continued from Page 1) 

nanager; Harold Postman, assis- 
ant to Rodgers; Howard Dietz, vice- 
jresident in charge of advertising 
md -ublicity; Silas F. Seadler, ad- 
m ?* ~l ig manager; William R. Fer- 
guson, exploitation manager. John 
3. Flynn, Western division sales 
vnanager and John J. Maloney, Cen- 
tal division sales manager, will sit 
n. 

District managers who will at- 
iend the Windy City parley will 
lumber John J. Bowen, New York; 
ludolph Berger, Washington; Mau- 
-ice N. Wolf, Boston; Robert Lynch, 
J hiladelphia; Charles E. Kessnich, 
Atlanta; George A. Hickey, Los An- 
gles; John P. Byrne, Detroit; Bur- 
Sus Bishop, Jr., Kansas City; Harris 
\ Wolfberg, St. Louis, and Samuel 
L Shirley, Chicago. 



Cairo House to Warners 
Cue to Post-War Plans? 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Dpera, Cairo's second largest theater. 
Following the run of "Casablanca" 
n July, the theater will be closed 
:or general renovation, reopening in 
'September under the Warner man- 
agement. 



Lamar Swift Promotion 
Brings Editorial Praise 



Atlanta — Promotion of Lamar 
Swift from Waycross manager for 
jucas & Jenkins Theaters, Para- 
nount Theaters, Paramount affiliate, 
o Macon city manager for the same 
ompany has brought into full per- 
pective the intense popularity of 
iwift among the residents of Way- 
ross. In the featured editorial of 
he Waycross Journal Herald, the 
heaterman was publicly lauded for 
as many outstanding contributions 
|0 the community's well-being. 
! Said the newspaper, in enumerat- 
ng Swift's accomplishments: "Way- 
ross and Ware County regrets io 
ose Swift even though delighted to 
:now he is moving upward in his 
hosen field of work. He earned a 
arge place in this city and county." 
'articularly cited were his war and 
iivic activities. 



Solo Operation 

Boston — The Coolidge Corner The- 
ater has lost all of its staff except 
Manager Jack Markle. Four of his 
aides have gone into the armed ser- 
vices and Markle is compelled to do 
all of the work formerly done by 
the quartet since he has to date 
found it impossible to replace them 
with competent men or women. 



Rep. Gross At Alt-Time High 

Rogers Pix Biz in 100% Gain, Confab Told 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Prexy James R. Grainger, who is 
presiding. Meeting is being attended 
by Maxwell Gillis and Sam Seplowin, 
Eastern and Central district sales 
heads, and exchange men from their 
territories. 

Grainger told the delegates that 
the company will give Mary Lee a 
build-up campaign akin to that 
benefiting Roy Rogers, the campaign 
getting under way with release of 
"Nobody's Darling." Actress will get 
a starring role in "Hit Parade of 
1944." 

Simultaneous openings of "In Old Okla- 
home," are scheduled for 20 important key 
situations, with the engagements to be backed 
by exhibitor co-operative ad campaigns, radio 
spot announcements, and 24 sheet posting, in 



addition to local exploitation. 

Today's session will center about discus- 
sion of sales policy, as well as productions 
scheduled for the immediate future, including 
"Brazil," "Atlantic City," "Gay Glades," 
"The Old Waldorf," and the Roy Rogers pro- 
duction, "Man From Music Mountain." All 
these productions will receive similar promo- 
tion in key cities. 

Yates and Grainger leave tomorrow for 
Chicago, where the second of Republic's 
sales meetings is to be held Friday and Sat- 
urday, at the Brake Hotel. Present at this 
session will be Midwestern District Sales 
Manager E. L. Walton, Southern District 
Sales Manager Merritt Davis, and exchange- 
men from these territories. Third and last 
meeting in the current series is to be held 
July 22-23, at the studio, where Yates and 
Grainger will be joined by Studio Head M. 
J. Siegel and Western District Sales Man- 
ager F. A. Bateman, as well as area ex- 
changemen. 



Alexander Sees Blow to Pix 
In Post-War U. S. Isolation 



(Continued from Page 1) 

to this country's world film trade, 
which will, if we enter upon firm and 
friendly commercial relations with 
other lands, reach unprecedented pro- 
portions, it was declared yesterday 
by J. Don Alexander, president of 
Alexander Film Co., of Colorado 
Springs. 

Here on a business visit, following 
the shift of the firm's local offices 
from 630 Ninth Ave. to 500 Fifth 
Ave., Alexander asserted that not 
only will American theatrical films, 
but also advertising films such as 
his organization produces, play a 
hugely important role in foreign 
lands. Alleviation of the interna- 
tional resentment which is certain 
to be a by-product of the conflict, 
as and when hostilities cease, and 
the burden of re-educating present- 
enemy countries, will fall squarely 
upon the American film industry, he 
added. 

Behind the scenes today, engineers 
and designers are fashioning blue- 
prints of myriad new products. 
With the eventual manufacture _ of 
the latter, selling and demonstration 
film will have to be made, instructing 
the public here and abroad in their 
use. We are naturally going to share 
our advances in all the various 
branches of art and science with the 
people of other nations, he said. 

A full 90 per cent of the film now 
being produced by Alexander Film 
Co. are directly tied to the war effort. 
These films are sponsored by na- 
tional advertisers as well as mer- 
chants in thousands of communities. 
Typical of this product are the 
Treasury Department-endorsed Bond 
and 'Stamp films. Currently, the 
company has about 150 salesmen cov- 
ering the U. S., and each carries his 
own 35 mm. equipment. 

Alexander stated that he would 
leave for Colorado Springs tomor- 
row, stopping off in Detroit and Chi- 
cago en route. Mrs. Alexander is ac- 
companying him on the present trip. 



Polio Outbreak Decreases 
Texas Grosses by 25 P. C. 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Beaumont. Cases have been re- 
ported from outlying places around 
these cities. Some estimates have 
placed the total box-office loss as 
high as 25 per cent. 

Raymond Willie, assistant gen- 
eral manager, Inter-State, estimates 
that the loss of juvenile trade is 
about 50 per cent of normal, being 
heaviest in the nabes. M. S. White, 
with a nabe in Fort Worth claims a 
Saturday drop of from 450-600 kids 
to 10 only, while Leon Lewis, Lib- 
erty, subsequent downtown, reports 
a heavy decrease. 

Willie told The Film Daily that 
while no requests have come from 
any Government authorities to the 
theaters to close, such suggestions 
have come from private sources, and 
in one area in Fort Worth a com- 
munity project of three days a week 
has closed. In Beaumont, according 
to S. L. Oakley, Jefferson, the Ctiy 
Health Officer has asked exclusion 
of children under 12. Swimming 
pools and Sunday schools have been 
closed in most of these places. 

State Health Officer Dr. Geo. W. 
Cox declares the spread of the dis- 
ease is epidemic, with upwards of 
300 cases now reported, including 
some deaths. New cases are re- 
ported daily and the area of inci- 
dence widens with each report. 

In addition to the loss of the 
juvenile trade, the box-offices suffer 
adult losses — those who ordinarily 
attend the children, those who re- 
frain because the children are kept 
away, and those who abstain from 
attendance through their own fear. 



Report Chakeres Circuit 
Taking Sam Lee's Four 

Cincinnati — The Phil Chakeres 
Circuit, iSpringfield, O., is reported 
to have taken over four Kentucky 
theaters operated by Sam Lee, and 
located at Winchester and Frank- 
fort. 



More Chi. Men Face 
Extortion Indictment 



(Continued from Page 1) 

be filed before Sept. 7, when the six 
alleged Chicago gangsters named in 
the indictment, in addition to Louis 
Kaufman, business agent of Local 
244, Newark operators' union, and 
John Rosselli, West Coast agent for 
the extortion ring, are scheduled to 
go on trial. They are charged with 
conspiracy to violate the Federal 
anti-racketeering statutes. 

Boris Kostelanetz, special assis- 
tant U. S. attorney general in charge 
of the prosecution, was questioned 
about the identities of those ex- 
pected to be added to the list of de- 
fendants. He refused to comment, 
although he did state that "the 
special Federal grand jury is still 
investigating." 

The six Chicago defendants, all 
assertedly members of the old Al 
Capone mob, plus Rosselli, are out 
on $100,000 bail each. Kaufman is 
free on $25,000 bail. 



New City Safety Code 
Goes to Omaha's Council 



Omaha — Fire Commissioner Wal- 
ter Korisko has introduced an ordi- 
nance in City Council providing for 
a new city safety code that would 
require free certificates of occu- 
pancy to be obtained annually by 
any public gathering place accom- 
modating more than 50 persons. 

The new rules, which have the 
unanimous recommendation of the 
Council, will come up for final ac- 
tion later this month and if passed 
will go into effect in October. 

They provide tighter regulations 
for fireproofing of decorations, tend- 
ance of exit doors, passageways to 
exits, fire extinguisher placement, 
posting of capacity notices, direc- 
tions to exits and quarterly inspec- 
tion by officials of the fire depart- 
ment. 

The number of exits would deter- 
mine capacity. Violators would be 
subject to fines up to $100 and to 
90 days' imprisonment. 



Douglas House to Allison 

Terre Haute, Ind. — John Allison, 
has acquired the Virginia Theater, 
here from Harry Douglas, operator 
of the Cozy Theater, Duggar. 



"Aleutians" May Be 
Shown in 2 Versions 

Washington Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — E. Palmer Hoyt, new 
domestic director of the OWl who 
has kept out of the Army OWI dis- 
pute on the length of Capt. John 
Huston's "Report on the Aleutians," 
has decided that both versions should 
be offered to the industry. It is now 
up to WAC, and it is believed here 
that WAC will offer to handle both 



■n — p — p — n — »s — i n c 

21! W A- 4 T H ST 
NYC 




EAKUP-The Truth About RITA HAYWORTH and VICTOR MATURE 



BIGGEST "BOX OFFICE GROSS" 
OF ANY MOVIE MAGAZINE 



MONTH AFTER MONTH THE PUBLIC PAYS MORE 

MONEY FOR PHOTOPLAY — THE INDUSTRY'S 

LUXURY MAGAZINE — THAN FOR ANY OTHER 

MOVIE MAGAZINE PUBLISHED 



^^^^n 



Schine To Be Ordered to Dispose of 9 




{See Column 3 Below) 



Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 




The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



-IF DAILY 



=^t. 84, NO. 10 



NEW YORK, THURSDAY, JULY 15. 1943 



TEN CENTS 



NEIC SETS PROGRAM^ ELECTS SCHAEFER 

New Eng. Indies Ask WPB Probe Pix Hoarding 



Letter Proposes That Gov't 
Agency 'Require' Distribs. 
Release Completed Product 



By FLOYD BELL 

FILM DAILY Staff Correspondent 

Boston — George R. Farnum, 
former Assistant U. S. Attor- 
ney General, now representing 
more than 200 independent theaters 
in New England, yesterday released 
a letter to the WPB asking for im- 
mediate investigation of the extent 
to which major producer-distributors 

{Continued, on Page 4) 

RKO Radio to Boost 
Top Pix Pre-selling 

RKO Radio's top pix for 1943-44 
will be given national advance pre- 
selling campaigns on a greater scale 
than ever before, S. Barret McCor- 
mick, director of advertising and 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Warner Frisco Meeting 
To Get Under Way Today 

San Francisco — Last of the three 
regional sales meetings being held 
by Warners this year will be called 
to order by Ben Kalmenson, general 

(Continued on Page 4) 



WB $450,000 Bid 
For 'Junior Miss' Tops 

Warners reported bid of $450,000 
is said to be the top offered thus 
far for screen rights to "Junior 
Miss," Jerome Chodorov - Joseph 
Fields hit which has been playing 
on Broadway since Nov. 18, 1941. 
Other bids reported include: Wil- 
liam Goetz, $400,000 or $355,000 
plus 25 per cent of the net; Colum- 
bia, $335,000 plus 30 per cent of 
the net and United Artists for Mary 
Pickford, $350,000 plus 45 per cent 
of the net. Buyer of the property 
is expected to be named within the 
next two weeks with the picture due 
for June, 1945 release. 



"For Whom the Bell Tolls" Acclaimed as 

Monumental B. O. Blessing at Its Premiere 

One of the most widely-read literary properties of modern times — Ernest 
Hemingway's "For Whom the Bell Tolls," romantic and tragic saga of the 
Spanish Revolution which was a dress rehearsal for the present World War, 
has emerged in all its stark and sensational glory upon the screen, brought 
thereto by Paramount. ... It represents .... the acme of motion picture 
mechanics and artistry. To showmen, wherever they may be under freedom's 
skies, or whatever the size or scope of their - outlets, "For Whom the Bell 
Tolls" stands as both a monumental box-office blessing and a monument to 
the vast potentialities of the screen in our day. 

(For full review, turn to Page 7. For report on last night's notable pre- 
miere, turn to Along the Rialto, Page 4.) 



'Adequate' War Info. I D off J to Press Sale 
Pix Seen by Harmon Of 9 Schine Houses 



Full confidence that an adequate 
program of war information films 
will be formulated at tomorrow's 
joint meeting here of the WAC Co- 
ordinating Committee, Theaters Di- 
vision executive committee, and the 
chairmen of the exhibitors area com- 
mittees, was voiced yesterday by 
Francis S. Harmon, WAC vice-chair- 
man, in addressing the RKO Radio 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Para. District Managers 
To Discuss FWTBT Policy 



Policy by which "For Whom the 
Bell Tolls" will be roadshown 
throughout the country, will be dis- 
cussed at a Paramount district man- 
agers' meeting which gets under 
way today at the Pierre Hotel. Neil 
Agnew, general sales manager, will 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — The Department of 
Justice intends to press for the dis- 
posal of the nine theaters the Schine 
Circuit reported last week it could 
not sell. Assistant Attorney General 
Tom C. Clark, chief of the anti-trust 
division, said it is not likely that the 
matter will be heard in court before 
September, but the Justice Depart- 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Would Stop Showing of 
"Roger Touhy, Gangster" 

Chicago — Contending that "Roger 
Touhy, Gangster," produced by 20th- 
Fox would wreak irreparable harm, 
damage and injury to the name, char- 
acter and reputation of Touhy, At- 
torney T. J. McCormick seeks a Fed- 
eral Court injunction against the 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Rep. Plans Own Radio Show 

Will Buy Time for Coast-to-Coast Program 



Depinet Drive, RKO's Tops; 
Prize Winners Announced 



Terming the recent drive which 
bore his name the company's most 
successful, Ned E. Depinet, RKO 
Radio prexy, announced its winners 
at yesterday's session of the Wal- 
(Continued on Page 7) 



Plan for a Republic radio pro- 
gram, to be built around the stu- 
dio's talent roster and to be broad- 
cast over a national hook-up, Coast 
to Coast, was announced yesterday 
by Herbert J. Yates and Prexy James 
R. Grainger at the final session of 
the New York A.C. sales meeting. 

It is understood that the plan 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Dullzell, Brandt, Feinberg 

Fill National Offices; 

24 on Co-ordinating Com. 

By LOU PELEGRINE 

FILM DAILY Staff Writer 

Plans for complete mobiliza- 
tion of the amusement world to 
advance the nation's war effort 
were adopted 
by leaders in 
every branch 
of show busi- 
ness yesterday 
at the opening 
session of the 
initial confer- 
ence of the 
National E n- 
t a i n m e n t 
Industry Coun- 
cil at the Ho- 
t e 1 Waldorf- 
Astoria. The 
conference, at 
which 42 ma- 
jor national or- 
ganizations in 
the entertainment world are repre- 
sented, runs through today. 
Officers and a co-ordinating com- 

(Continued on Page 8) 




GEORGE J. SCHAEFER 



Dlef Clearance Pad 
Approved by Board 



Stipulation agreed upon by Dlef 
Amusement Corp., all five signers of 
the New York consent decree and 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Grocers Deliver Ads 
For Halifax Exhihs. 

Halifax, N. S. — Exhibitors have 
found a solution to the problem of 
how to distribute hand bills and other 
advertising matter despite the short- 
age of boys willing to deliver the 
material. Operators of Halifax and 
Dartmouth theaters now deliver the 
matter in bulk to retail grocers who, 
in return for cash and passes, include 
copies in all out-going orders. In 
some cases, retailers display advertis- 
ing in their windows and get screen 
advertising mention in return. 



IKE 



DAILY 



Thursday, July 15, 1943 




Vol. 84, No. 10 Thurs., July 15, 1943 10 Cents 



JOHN W. ALICOATE 



: Publisher 



DONALD M. MERSEREAU : Ceneral Manager 



CHESTER B. BAHN :::::: Editor 

Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address: 
Filmday, New York. 

Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoirian (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco-Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



FINANCIAL 



^ (Wednesday, July 14) 



Am. Seat 17% 

Col. Picts. vtc. (2V 2 %) 19l/ 4 

Columbia Picts. pfd 

Con. Fm. Ind 2% 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd.. . 173/g 

East. Kodak 166 

do pfd 

Gen. Prec. Eq 23 1/4 

Loew's, Ine 63% 

Paramount 30 

RKO 101/g 

RKO $6 pfd 997/s 

20th Century-Fox 23% 

20th Century-Fox pfd. 34'/ 2 

Univ. Pict. pfd 

Warner Bros 15% 

do pfd 

89 13-32 89 13- 



17 

18% 



17% 
19 



+ % 
+ % 



2% 
171/4 
165 



2% 
17% 
165 



— % 

— % 

— Vi 



223/ 4 

621/4 
293/4 
9% 
97 
23% 
34 



23 

631/4 

30 

10 

99% 

23% 

34 



— % 

+ 1 

+ % 

+ % 

+ 2% 

+ % 



15% 
32 89 



15% 
13-32 



+ Vi 



NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Para. B'way 3s55 . . . . 77% 77% 77% 

Warner Bros.' dbs. 6s48 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Monogram Picts. ... 3% 3% 3% + % 

Radio-Keith cvs. ... 2 1% 2 + % 

Sonotone Corp 3% 3% 33,4 

Technicolor 14% 14% 14% + % 

Trans-Lux 3 1/4 3% 3% 

Universal Corp. vtc 

Universal Picts 183/ 4 183/4 18% + % 

N. Y. OVER-THE-COUNTER SECURITIES 

Bid Asked 
Roxy Thea. Bldg. 4s 1st '57 77% 793/ 4 



Western AMPTO Will 
Hold October Meet 

Pittsburgh — At a meeting held by 
the directors of the AMPTO of West- 
ern Pennsylvania a motion was ap- 
proved to hold their annual conven- 
tion in Pittsburgh in October. It 
will be a two-day business and social 
affair and the exact dates, as well 
as general chairman and committees, 
will be announced later. 



cominG mid GOinG 



£ 



HERBERT J. YATES and JAMES R. GRAINGER 
leave for Chicago today. 

ED KUYKENDALL, MPTOA prexy, is expected 
to arrive in New York today. 

CHARLES K. STERN, assistant treasurer of 
Loew's, is vacationing in Swampscott, Mass. 

NUR M. COKOOL, managing director of Trin- 
idad's Globe circuit, is a New York visitor. 

EDWARD J. MANN1X returns to the Coast 
tomorrow. 

JULES J. RUBENS, executive of Publix-Creat 
States Theaters, is a New York visitor. 

MOE SILVER, Pittsburgh zone manager for 
Warner Theaters, and HARRY FEINSTEIN, film 
buyer for that territory, are in New York for 
a few days. 

BUDD ROGERS, N. Y. rep. for Charles R. 
Rogers' releases through UA, accompanied by 
MRS. ROGERS leaves today for Belgrade Lake, 
Me. They will be gone for two weeks. 

SAM MARX and JOHN TWIST, M-G-M pro- 
ducer and writer, respectively, will leave for 
the West Coast Saturday after a brief visit to 
New York where they did preparatory work 
on "They Also Wear Wings." 



(AMES CAGNEY, who arrived in town on Tues- 
day, leaves for Massachusetts tomorrow. 

KENNETH THOMSON returns to the Coast 
next week. 

DOROTHY LAMOUR is at the Waldorf-Astoria 
from the Coast. Her husband, CA-PT. WILLIAM 
ROSS HOWARD, 3RD, is with her. 

DEWEY D. BLOOM, M-G-M Canadian field 
representative, is in New York for promotion 
conferences with William R. Ferguson, M-G-M 
exploitation manager. 

IRVING MARTIN, publicist at the Stanley 
Baltimore prior to joining the Merchant Marines, 
returned from a 3,900-mile convoy trip, is 
spending a brief leave here. 

MRS. SAMUEL GERMAINE, wife of the 20th- 
Fox booker, New Haven, is visiting in New 
Orleans with her son, Pvt. Tom Cermaine, form- 
erly at Vitagraph. 

LEO ROSEN, manager of the Strand, Albany, 
is at Lake Luzerne, returning Monday. 

HARRY GOLDBERG, Troy Theater, Troy, is 
in New York, while SID SOMMER, Lincoln, Troy, 
leaves Monday. 



Would Stop Showing of 
"Roger Touhy, Gangster" 

(Continued from Page 1) 

company. Touhy, serving a 99-year 
sentence at Statesville prison for 
kidnapping also faces an additional 
199-year sentence for aiding pris- 
oners to escape. 

The Chicago Times story says 
20th-Fox offered Touhy $1,000 for 
saying, "Crime does not pay," in 
the film, but he refused it. 

Attorney McCormick says that at 
the Federal Court hearing next week 
for an injunction, he will bring out 
that the appearance of state officials 
in the film gives it political aspects 
which are also unfair to Touhy. 



Small Pays $100,000 for 
Booth Tarkington Novel 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Edward Small has 
bought the new Booth, Tarkington 
book, "Kate Fennigate," for $100,- 
000 and has set a budget of $1,400,000 
for the picturization of the book. 

He is trying to get Claudette Col- 
bert and Susan Peters for the two 
leading feminine roles. 



Beverly Sitgreaves Dies 

Beverly Sitgreaves, 76, prominent 
on the American stage for 50 years, 
died yesterday in her New York 
apartment after a long illness. She 
had appeared in many theaters in 
Europe as well as in Africa and Aus- 
tralia. Funeral will be held tomor- 
row at noon at the Walter B. Cooke 
Funeral Home, 117 West 72nd St., 
under auspices of the Actors Fund 
of America. 



Aniline Stockholders 
Vote in a New Board 



Third board of directors since con- 
trol of the company passed to the 
Alien Property Custodian was elected 
by the stockholders of General Ani- 
line & Film Corp. Successor to Rob- 
ert E. McConnell, president and 
chairman of the board, will be elected 
at the board's organization meeting 
July 28. He resigned some months 
ago. 

New board comprises Neal Dow 
Becker, George W. Burpee, Colvin 
Brown, William F. Carey, Robert F. 
Carr, William H. Coverdale, Herbert 
P. Gallagher, John D. Hertz, Mat- 
thew J. Hickey, Jr., William F. 
Humphrey, Col. Louis Johnson, 
Thomas O'Hara, Dr. E. C. Williams, 
A. N. Williams and Dr. R. E. Wilson. 

Leo T. Crowley as Alien Property 
Custodian holds 97 per cent of the 
stock of General Aniline, formerly 
controlled in Germany. In 1939 the 
company absorbed Agfa Ansco Corp. 



"Heaven" Combination 
Showings Start Monday 

Combined preview-and-trade-show- 
ings of 20th-Fox's "Heaven Can 
Wait" will start in 30 cities on Mon- 
day and will extend through Aug. 2, 
it was announced yesterday by Tom 
J. Connors, sales chief. 



Pioneer Ore. Exhib. Dead 

Portland, Ore. — Leser Cohen, 85, 
one of the first theater operators in 
Oregon, and for many years oper- 
ating the Globe and Grand theaters, 
died at his home following a short 
illness. Cohen headed the Peoples 
Amusement Co. 



Ben Smith Recovers 

Ben Smith, Monogram salesman 
in Albany, is back on duty after a 
siege in the Albany Hospital, where 
he underwent a serious eye opera- 
tion. 



Saul Goldman's 

VARIETY PICTURES 

1325 S. WABASH — CHICAGO 

THE FASTEST CROWING MIDWESTERN 

INDEPENDENT DISTRIBUTOR 



Para. District Managers 
To Discuss FWTBT Policy 

(Continued from Page 1) 

preside at the sessions, which will 
continue through Friday. 

Other product and policy plans for 
the 1943-44 season will be taken up 
at the meeting and sales and adver- 
tising plans for the first block of 
pictures for the new season will be 
outlined. 



"Air Power" Premiere 
At Globe on Saturday 



I 



Walt Disney's "Victory Through 
Air Power" will have its world pre- 
miere at the Globe Saturday, 



Metro Asks James Be Deferred 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — M-G-M has asked a 
Beaumont, Tex. draft board to defer 
Harry James, classified 1-A after his 
recent marriage to Betty Grable, un- 
til he finishes his current picture. 



NEW YORK 
THEATERS 



RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL 

ROCKEFELLER CENTER 

THE YOUNGEST PROFESSION' 

with 

VIRGINIA WEIDLER, EDWARD ARNOLD 

and Five Important Guest Stars 

AN M-G-M PICTURE 

Gala Stage Revue • Symphony Orchestra 

First Mezzanine Seats Reserved. Circle 6-4600 



Jj<; BETTY GRABLE )C 

GEORGE MONTGOMERY* CESAR ROMERO 

CO*!* 1SIAND 

A 20TH CINTUBY.fOX PICTURE in TECHNICOLOR 

* PLUS A BIG STAGE SHOW * 

BUY Q ^ V V 7M.AVE. 

BONDS BV Vs# VV 1 50th ST. 



"DIXIE" * m Person 

with * ANDREWS SISTERS 

BING CROSBY if TIM HERBERT 

DOROTHY LAMOUR -fc MITCH AYRES 

A Paramount Picture -fa and his orchestra 



Cool 



PARAMOU NT Times Square 



EEH 




RODDY McDOWALL • PRESTON FOSTER 

"MY FRIEND FLICKA" 

and 

ROSEMARY LANE . PATRIC KNOWLES 

"ALL BY MYSELF" 



LoTweSTBTE 



ON SCREEN 

"BATAAN" 

WITH 
ROBERT TAYLOR 











Saxe -;;«^° 






itvi 



■dV} 



* Splices' 



. otv ca«vP^- 
*****%> ***** 



to 



oiCo^ 



.rtxetce w ft50 



* ^iviV * S T °i V& art ^ a td 










oUP s ' 










VJ1 



THIS 
STATEMENT! 



PETE SMITH'S "SEVENTH COLUMN" is the most 
widely advertised Short Subject of all time! 

(Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, of course) 

Sell War Stamps to Launch 
Plane Carrier 'iShangri-La"! 







W- 



THE 



Thursday, July 15, 1943 



DAILY 



'Adequate' War Info. 
Pix Seen by Harmon 



{Continued from Page 1) 

sales meeting at the Waldorf-As- 
toria. 

Harmon, who appeared before the 
RKO Radio delegates at the request 
of Prexy Ned E. Depinet, quoted ex- 
tensively from the Congressional 
Record's pages, stressing Senatorial 
tributes to the industry for its "vol- 
untary co-operation" in aiding the 
war effort by exhibiting war infor- 
mation pix." 

"It is safe to say that for the 
months ahead of us, an adequate 
program will be continued," Har- 
mon asserted. 

The WAC vice-chairman, discuss- 
ing the various types of film which 
have "gone to war," stated that in- 
formation just given him by the War 
Department showed that as of Wed- 
nesday, July 14, the industry had 
delivered 5,137 features and 6,941 
shorts to Army exchanges here and 
in London. These films are part of 
the more than 10,000 prints_ of cur- 
rent movies given by the industry 
for free showings to servicemen 
overseas. 




Warner Frisco Meeting 
To Get Under Way Today 

(Continued from Page 1) 

sales manager, in the Mark Hopkins 
Hotel this morning. 

Local conclave is for the West 
Coast District, headed by Henry 
Herbel as district manager. Home 
office sales executives who arrived 
yesterday to take part also include 
Arthur Sachson, Roy Haines, Nor- 
man H. Moray, A. W. Schwalberg, 
Howard Levinson, and Albert S. 
Howson. 

Marty Weiser, Western field rep, 
is on hand for the three-day meeting. 



To Fete Herman in Albany 

Albany — Variety Club is holding 
a testimonial for Leon Herman, for- 
mer UA salesman here, at the Ten 
Eyck, July 26. Herman is now 
with UA in Buffalo. Committee con- 
sists of George Jeffrys, Dick Hayes, 
Sidney Stockton, Bill Williams, Wel- 
den Waters and Neil Hellman. 




Ben Cammack Sam Schneider 

Raymond Hackett 



The Bell Rings Out! 

• • • LAST night the institutional and classical facade of the 
local Rivoli, operated at one time by Publix, looked down upon a dis- 
tinguished influx of industry potentates, national and civic leaders, high 
officers of the Armed Forces, Society big-wigs. Nabobs of the arts and 

commerce, and smiled And Y. Frank Freeman and his Paramount 

constituents and confreres, of whom there were legion on hand, had 

good cause to smile back, and did For Mister Freeman, et al. the 

event, — glittering world premiere performance of "For Whom the Bell 

Tolls" — , signalized a dream of three long years come true 

Over that span. Paramount had the. great Hemingway novel in prepara- 
tion and production, and now it was clocking its first paid admissions 

Before its release life is o'er, the latter will aggregate scores of mil- 
lions And of this vast "take," Messrs. Exhibitors will be the bene- 
ficiaries Many of their members hereabouts were in the audience 

last night, and thrilled in their showmen souls at the great film which 
is to come their way 

T T T 

• # • OTHER wreathed smiles at the premiere were worn by 
the officials of the National War Fund, enriched by the gate which 

totaled more'n $7,000 Each and everyone present slapped down 

$4.40 per pasteboard, and did it early and eagerly, for days ago the 

occasion was a complete sell-out For each $4.40 paid, the lucky 

one received the following: (1) the picture itself; (2) the satisfaction 
of aiding the USO and the other war agencies within the framework 
of NWF; (3) the initial public "look-see" at the precedent-making 
movie; (4) entertainment communion with their fellow greats; and (5) 
an unparalleled opportunity to add to personal prestige by clarioning 

to their circle of friends that they had actually seen FWTBT It 

was a big and bounteous bargain, boys! Mister Freeman, astute 

exec, that he is, must have translated it all into biz terms, perhaps 
saying to himself: "Umm, $4.40 a ticket is a giveaway! The picture 
cost us (here same rapid mental calculation) just $195.39 per foot" 
That, dear reader, is just about the McCoy answer 

FWTBT's expenditure amounted to $2,970,000, sans prints! 

T T T 

• • • JUST prior to the opening, NWF leaders, headed up by 
Winthrop Aldrich, president, and Prescott S. Bush, national campaign 
chairman, participated with Hollywood luminaries in a WMCA broad- 
cast from the Rivoli's lobby Prominent, among others in the celeb- 
rity-studded audience within, were Mrs. Winthrop Aldrich, Mrs. John 
Hay Whitney, Mrs. Ogden Reid. Miss Anne Morgan, Mrs. I. Borden Har- 
riman, Mrs. Ogden Mills, Mrs. Clarence Mackay, Miss Emily McAdoo, 
Elsa Maxwell (filmdom's favorite Social Register daughter), Mrs. Mar- 
shall Field, Mrs. Bernard Gimbel From the Armed Forces, — Major 

General T. A. Terry, Major General William Ottman, Major General 
Sanderford larman. Vice Admiral Adolphus Andrews, Rear Admiral 

Munroe Kelley, etc., etc Our crowd (oh, for rubber type right 

now!) included Barney Balaban, Stanton Griffis, Wendell L. Willkie, 
Floyd B. Odium, N. Peter Rathvon, Spyros P. Skouras, Francis S. Har- 
mon, Nicholas M. Schenck, Herbert J. Yates, George Skouras, Claude 
Lee, Jack Cohn, B. G. DeSylva, Sam Wood, Dorothy Lamour, John Hertz, 
Jr., Charles Francis "Socker" Coe, Neil Agnew (and his district manager 
brood in for today's meetin'), Mary Martin, Betty Hutton, Will H. Pine, 

Capt. William R. Howard, and scads more 'Twas a great premiere 

for a great picture! A doff of the chapeau to Alec Moss for the 

theater front and program! 

▼ T T 

• • • AVENGE PEARL HARBOR! 



N. Eng. Indies Ask 
Pix Hoarding Probe 



(Continued from Page 1) 

are withholding completed pictures 
and the justification for such prac- 
tice, if any. 

Farnum said he was representing 
the same group who recently opened 
an effort to have introduced in i - 
gress a bill establishing a ce. \g 
price on film rentals. 

Farnum's letter asked that the 
WPB "require" the majors to release 
to indies "all features completed and 
hoarded by them for future release," 
suggesting that if the distributors 
desired to withhold pix on comple- 
tion, "such part of the film stock as 
is not intended for the production 
of pictures for immediate release 
shall be re-allocated to independent 
producers." 

Text of Farnum's letter to the 
WPB follows: 

"On behalf of a group of independent 
motion picture exhibitors operating ap- 
proximately 200 theaters in New England, 
I hereby respectfully urge you to immed- 
iately investigate the extent to which the 
major motion picture producer-distributors 
are deliberately withholding completed pic- 
tures and the justification for such a prac- 
tice, and to take the necessary action to 
remedy such abuses as the facts may dis- 
close. 

"According to our information a large 
portion of the pictures already produced 
and now in the process of production are 
being so hoarded. 

"The practice of consuming a large part 
of the raw stock allocated to producers in 
the making of pictures which are not re- 
leased on completion but, on the contrary, 
are hoarded for some indefinite future re- 
lease, we feel is entirely inconsistent with 
the object and spirit of the rationing rules 
and is calculated to aggravate the abuses 
of monopoly and among other things, to 
promote the following evils. 

"First: It is artificially and drastically 
limiting the supply of pictures necessary 
to enable independent exhibitors to operate 
their theaters. 

"Second: It is giving the major producer- 
distributors a distinctly unfair advantage 
over independent exhibitors in bargaining 
for pictures and is enabling them to de- 
mand and obtain unreasonable film rentals. 

"Third: It is unjust and unfair to the 
public as independent exhibitors are re- 
quired to fix admission prices at a level 
that will enable them to survive and in the 
last analysis unreasonably high rentals de- 
manded by the producer-distributors for their 
pictures mean high admission prices. 

"We respectfully request that your board 
require the major film producer-distributors 
to release to independent theaters all fea- 
ture pictures completed and hoarded by them 
for future release, and in the event any pro- 
ducer-distributor does not desire to release 
all features on completion, we suggest that 
such part of the film stock as is not intended 
for the production of pictures for immed- 
iate release shall be re-allocated to indepen- 
dent producers to the end that the supply 
of film reasonably necessary shall be main- 
tained for the independent theaters and the 
public." 



10 p.m. Sedalia Curfew 

Sedalia, Mo.— The City Council 
has passed an ordinance providing 
for a 10 p.m. curfew. 



STORKS 



Baltimore — Sam Ward, manager] 
of the Royal here, is receiving con- 
gratulations upon the birth of a.1 
son at the University of Maryland) 
Hospital. 




«pH^ 



1 i 



^ - B 



UP*. 






Let's Keep 
Veiling Bonds I 



LITHOUS. 



Thursday, July 15, 1943 






Dlef Clearance Pad 
Approved by Board 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Warner Bros. Circuit Management 
Corp. has been approved by the ap- 
peals board and a consent award 
ordered. Action resulted from an 
oT ipeal to the board by Warner Bros. 
cuit, an intervenor, against an 
" W/ard in the clearance complaint 
filed by Dlef against the companies. 
Since the appeal the interested part- 
ies signed a stipulation which was 
awarded by the appeals board, as 
follows : 

The complaint against Vitagraph 
is dismissed. No clearance will be 
granted in licenses hereafter entered 
into by 20th-Fox, Paramount, K.KO 
and Loew's to the Stanley and May- 
fair Theaters, Newark, N. Y., over 
the Astor, operated by Dlef. Maxi- 
mum clearance of the Sanford, Irv- 
ington, over the Astor will be 14 
days. Maximum clearance to be 
granted the Castle, Irvington, over 
the Astor will be seven days on pic- 
tures playing both clear and repeat 
runs at the Castle. Maximum clear- 
ance of the Savoy, Newark, over the 
Astor will be three days. Award 
does not affect clearance of the Ritz 
over the Astor. Costs of the appeal 
are to be borne by Warner Bros. 
Circuit Management and of the ar- 
bitrator equally by the parties. 



Schuyler Theater, N. Y. City 
Files Clearance Complaint 

Schuyler Theater, Inc., operating 
the Schuyler, 504 Columbus Ave. has 
filed a clearance complaint with the 
N. Y. Arbitration Tribunal claiming 
the seven days clearance granted 
the Arden, 876 Columbus Ave. is 
unreasonable as to time and area as 
there is no competition between the 
houses. Elimination of all clear- 
ance, or if the arbitrator finds there 
is competition between the theaters, 
reduction to one day, is asked. Loew's, 
20th-Fox and RKO are named in the 
complaint. 



Mrs. Mary Pruniski Dead 

Little Rock, Ark. — Mrs. Mary 
Pruniski, 84, mother of Max Pru- 
niski, vice-president of Malco The- 
aters, Inc. is dead. Other survivors 
are a daughter, Mrs. J. R. Bauer 



WAR SERVICE 

... on the Film Front 



"Shangri-La Stamp Clubs," formed by 
managers of the Century Circuit of 37 the- 
aters, are largely credited with ringing up 
$56,000 in War Stamp sales since July 1, 
according to Fred Schwartz. 

Club idea pits nabe youngsters against 
one another to see who can sell the most 
stamps by ringing doorbells, canvassing 
shops, etc. Highest tally in any one neigh- 
borhood nets the youngster a six-month pass 
to the house. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

ment has already made up its mind 
not to yield to the request of the 
Schine Circuit that it be permitted to 
retain the theaters. "Eventually 
they'll have to dispose of them," said 
Clark. 



Depinet Drive, RKO's Tops; 
Prize Winners Announced 



REVIEWS Of neW f I L m 5 D of J to Press Sale 

"FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS" 01 J Schine H0US8S 

with Gary Cooper, Ingrid Bergman 
Paramount 170 Mins. 

BOX-OFFICE POWERHOUSE, FOR ALL THEATERS, MAGNIFICENTLY PRODUCED 
AND ACTED, RANKS AMONG MEMORABLE FILMS. 

One of the most widely-read literary properties of modern times, — Ernest Heming- 
way's "For Whom the Bell Tolls," romantic and tragic saga of the Spanish Revolution 
which was a dress rehearsal for the present World War — , has emerged in all its stark 
and sensational glory upon the screen, brought thereto by Paramount at a declared 
cost, without prints, of $2,970,000, and an incalculable investment of time and genius. 

It is worth it all, for it represents throughout its approximately 15,200 feet, robed 
in Technicolor, the acme of motion picture mechanics and artistry. To showmen, wher- 
ever they may be under freedom's skies, or whatever the size or scope of their outlets, 
"For Whom the Bell Tolls" stands as both a monumental box-office blessing and a monu- 
ment to the vast potentialities of the screen in our day. 

Weighing the elements which have gone into its cinematic fashioning, first men- 
tion properly goes to Paramount's Y. Frank Freeman, who purchased the screen rights 
upon the recommendation of Cecil B. DeMille, and paid $150,000 for them. To Sam 
Wood, as both producer and director, must deservedly be extended the honors for hold- 
ing the vital reins of the vehicle, and driving it skillfully and surely to the very peak 
of eminence. 

Wood, therefore, has exposed himself to the dogmatically-expressed conviction 
of virtually all who have, in these exciting first stages of the picture's release, 
witnessed his directorial wizardry, that he is Oscar bound. So brilliantly has he 
handled the superlative cast, and dovetailed them in the transcending technical 
pattern, that the famed golden statuettes of the Academy may well descend en 
masse upon many of the histrionic participants as well as his production asso- 
ciates at the studio. 

To make the nation's marquees magnetic, and promotional campaigns rugged in 
patron appeal, Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman are the stars. Through them the im- 
portant element of romance is purveyed with richness and understanding, — a romance 
set off thrillingly and in bold relief against events, as ominous and chilling as the 
mountain fastnesses which form the story's locale, and the uncompromising warfare 
and attendant fatalistic suffering which surges about and above the peasant patriots. 

But Hemingway's story, the full flavor of which is captured thoroughly and magni- 
ficently by Dudley Nichols' screenplay, and interpreted and imparted so admirably by 
Sam Wood, owes much as a film of true greatness to the supporting cast. One comes 
away from the picture with a feeling of genuine awe at the performances of Akim 
Tamiroff, as Pablo; Katina Paxinou, as Pilar, of the whiplash tongue, homely features, 
and iron heart; Vladimir Sokoloff, as the hardy and weatherbeaten Anselmo; Mikhail 
Rasumny, as the gypsy; Joseph Calleia, as El Sordo; and all the other actors and actresses 
who emerge in the action. 

So familiar to millions is the story of "For Whom the Bell Tolls" that it needs 
neither tabloid telling nor much of comment here. There is beauty and effectiveness 
in the employment of the main title and those devoted to the picture's credits. What 
would ordinarily be a stirring climax sequence to many a big picture comes sweeping 
in at the outset, namely, the bombing of the cafe, and the journey of Cooper as the 
American, Montana-born professor of Spanish, who has joined the forces of the Republic 
in order to contribute to tyranny's defeat, to the mountain lair of some defending patriots 
following his blasting of a railroad bridge, and there to seek support of a similar mis- 
sion in order to wreck the men and armor of the foe. 

Vast emotional impact is given to audiences via the siege on the mountain top, the 
massacre of nationalists at the cliff, and the super-dramatic ending which depicts the 
bridge's destruction by Cooper, and his death at the hands of the foe. The photography 
by Ray Rennahan is superb, — at times even breath-taking — , and the Technicolor is 
gorgeous. Gordon Jennings' special photographic effects are also notable. 

To showmen who have not yet had the opportunity and consequent satisfaction of 
seeing FWTBT, a suggestion is in order. The film is a feast, and a long one. As pro- 
jected at the special press preview in Broadway's Rivoli on Tuesday night of this week, 
the picture had no intermission. It should have, because it will give patrons a chance 
to relax a bit, and better digest and appreciate the many rousing scenes. 

FWTBT is a "natural" for high-powered exploitation and audience-creation. 
Showmen can make any engagement as big as they want. The attraction is one 
that will live long commercially and in industry and public memory. So full of 
life itself, it could do no other. 

CAST: Gary Cooper, Ingrid Bergman, Akim Tamiroff, Arturo de Cordova, Joseph 
Calleia, Katina Paxinou, Vladimir Sokoloff, Mikhail Rasumny, Fortunio Bonanova, Eric 
Feldary, Victor Varconi, Lilo Yarson, Alexander Granach, Adia Kuznetzoff, Leonid 
Snegoff, Leo Bulgakov, Duncan Renaldo, George Coulouris, Frank Puglia, Pedro Cordoba, 
Michael Visaroff, Konstantin Shayne, Martin Garralaga, Jean Del Val, Jack Mylong, 
Feodor Chaliapin. 

CREDITS: Producer and Director, Sam Wood; Executive Producer, B. G. De Sylva; 
Author, Ernest Hemingway; Screenplay, Dudley Nichols; Cameraman, Ray Rennahan; 
Music Score, Victor Young; Technicolor Color Director, Natalie Kalmus; Associate, 
Morgan Padelford; Special Photographic Effects, Gordon Jennings; Process Photography, 
Farciot Edouart; Art Direction, Hans Dreier, Haldane Douglas; Film Editors, Sherman 
Todd, John Link; Sound Recording, Harold Lewis, Don Johnson; Set Direction, Bert 
Granger; Production Designer, William Cameron Menzies. 

DIRECTION, Aces. PHOTOGRAPHY, Superb. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

dorf-Astoria sales meeting. Among 
winners were: 

Major contest for U. S. branches; First, 
Milwaukee: second. Denver: third, Kansas 
City: fourth, Portland. Oregon. For Canada: 
first, Vancouver: second, St. John. 

Group contest: Group one: first, Dallas; 
second, San Francisco. Group two: first, 
Indianapolis; second, Charlotte. Group three: 
first, Memphis; second, New Haven. 

District managers: first, L. S. Gruenberg, 
Rocky Mountain District: second, Ben T. 
Cammack, Southwestern District; third, Da- 
vid Prince, Southeastern district. 

Best salesmen : Metropolitan district, E. 
T. Carroll, New York; Northeastern district, 
W. H. Gardiner, Boston; Eastern district, 
E. T. Grover, Washington: Eastern Central 
district, R. Richardson, Cleveland; South- 
eastern district, P. Harrison, Atlanta; South- 
western district, C. Blakely, Oklahoma City; 
Midwestern district, M. Kassel, Chicago; 
Prairie district, W. Benjamin, Des Moines: 
Rocky Mountain district, H. Evans, Salt 
Lake City: Western district, L. Goldsmifh, 
Seattle: Canadian district, H. Hackimson, 
Toronto. 

Field men, major contest: first prize to 
be divided between Bob Hickey, field super- 
visor, and Ted Wynn, field man, Chicago; 
second, T. Bidwell McCormick, Denver; third, 
Fred Calvin. St. Louis. Kansas City. 

Home office representatives, major con- 
test: first, F. Duffy; second, J. Wangberg; 
third, J. J. Schnitzer. 

Short subject contest: first, Salt Lake 
City; second, Washington; third, Minneap- 
olis: fourth, Los Angeles; fifth, Memphis; 
sixth, Atlanta; seventh, Cleveland; eighth, 
Milwaukee: ninth, Seattle; tenth, Dallas. 
Canada: first, Montreal; second, Winnipeg. 
District managers: first, L. S. Gruenberg, 
Rocky Mountain; second, J. H. Maelntyre, 
Western. 



Crowds Jam B'way to See 
Notables at 'Tolls' Showing 



A crowd of several thousand per- 
sons gathered in front of the Rivoli 
Theater last night where Para- 
mount's "For Whom the Bell Tolls" 
played a benefit performance for the 
National War Fund — the first benefit 
to be given for it — and most of its 
members waited to see the film and 
other notables come out after the 
showing. Mounted policemen had 
little trouble in controlling the good- 
natured crowd, but most of those 
ordered to move on simply crossed 
the street and waited. 

WMCA broadcast from the lobby 
from 8:30 to 8:45. Those who ap- 
peared before the mike for brief 
speeches were Prescott Bush, na- 
tional chairman of the National War 
Fund, Senator Claude Pepper of 
Florida, Drew Pearson, Jack Benny, 
Dorothy Lamour, Betty Hutton, John 
Perry, Florida newspaper man, and 
B. G. DeSylva, Para.'s executive pro- 
ducer. 



Thursday, July 15, 1943 



NEIC Sets Program, 
Elects G. J. Schaefer 



(Continued from Page 1) 

mittee of 24 were named to put into 
operation the NEIC's program of 
full dedication of the amusement 
forces of the country to the bolster- 
ing of morale in the armed services 
and on the home front. They will 
serve until Dec. 31. 

George J. Schaefer, chairman 
of the WAC, who presided, was 
elected national chairman of the 
NEIC. Paul Dullzell, president 
of the Associated Actors and 
Artistes of America, was chosen 
national vice-chairman; Harry 
Brandt, president of the ITOA, 
national treasurer; William 
Feinberg, secretary of the As- 
sociated Musicians of Greater 
New York, Local 802, national 
secretary. Named as territorial 
vice-chairmen were James H. 
Sauter, chairman of the United 
Theatrical War Activities Com- 
mittee, New York; Kenneth 
Thomson, executive secretary of 
the Screen Actors Guild, Los An- 
geles; Virginia Payne, president 
of the Chicago local of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Radio Artists, 
Chicago. 

Elected to the co-ordinating com- 
mittee were: George Heller, AFRA, 
chairman; John Anderson, Critics' 
Circle; Howard Bay, United Scenic 
Artists; Kermit Bloomgarden, Amer- 
ican Theater Wing; James Cagney, 
president, SAG; Leonard Callahan, 
SESAC, Inc.; Walt Dennis, National 
Association of Broadcasters; John 
C. Flinn, Academy of Motion Picture 
Arts and Sciences and Society of In- 
dependent Motion Picture Produc- 
ers; Frederick Gamble, War Adver- 
tising Council; Abel ©reen, trade 
press; Abe Lastfogel, president, 
USO-Camp Shows; Philip Loeb, Ac- 
tors Equity Council; Bert Lytell, 
president, Actors Equity; Milton 
Merlin, Eastern representative, Hol- 
lywood Writers Mobilization; Solly 
Pernick, business manager, Theat- 
rical Protective Union, Local 1; 
James F. Reilly, League of New 
York Theaters; Elmer Rice, presi- 
dent, Dramatists Guild; Dorothy 
Rodgers, executive secretary, War 
Writers Board; Morris Seamon, 
Treasurers and Ticket Sellers Union, 
Local 751, IATSE; Matt Shelvey, 
national director, American Guild of 
Variety Artists; Lawrence Tibbett, 
president, AFRA and American 
Guild of Musical Artists; Milton 
Weintraub, secretary-treasurer, As- 
sociation of Theatrical Agents and 
Managers; Blanche Witherspoon, ex- 
ecutive secretary, AGMA; Henry 
Jaffe, UTWAC. 

Lavish tribute to the amusement world, 
the film industry in particular, for its assist- 
ant to the nation in the task oi winning the 
war was voiced at the meeting'. 

Henry Morgenthau, Jr., secretary of the 
iury, wired that it was impossible to 
pay the entertianment industry as rich a 
tribute as it deserved. "What you have 
done, and what you are doing for your coun- 
try in this war i^ representative of the 
type of patriotism," he said. "As a 
citizen I am proud of you. As secretary 
of the Treasury I am more than proud, for 



Rep* Plans Own Radio Show 

Will Buy Time for Coast-to-Coast Program 



(Continued from Page 1) 



contemplates a show of at least 30 
minutes, to be aired a minimum of 
once a week, with each program 
representing a $40,000 Republic bud- 
get. Company will buy the air time 
and there will be no resort to com- 
mercial sponsorship, it is said. If 
arrangements go through, the first 
program will hit the air waves about 
Sept. 1. 

Featured on the programs will be 
Roy Rogers and Mary Lee, while the 
shows will utilize virtually all stu- 
dio talent. Top Republic pix will 
get advance buildups and Ya-es also 
sees the new program as an oppor- 
tunity for the introduction of new 
talent. 

Republic has been using radio 
with increasing frequency recently 
and the results have been so satis- 
factory that the company's plan for 
its own show is said to be a natural 
result. Plan has been mulled over 
for about three months, prior to 
yesterday's announcement. 

SPG Protests Dismissal 
Of 3 Rep. Publicity Men 

W est Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — In the first citation of 
the employment stabilization plan 
to protect the rights of workers in 
the motion picture industry, the 



Screen Publicists Guild protested to 
Republic Productions that dismis- 
sals of three publicity men announced 
for July 24 would be in violation of 
the Labor-Management plan for the 
Southern California area which the 
War Manpower Commission ordered 
effective for all essential employes 
July 1. ' 

Assurance was given the Guild by Howard 
Sheehan, studio manager, that Republic had 
no intention of violating either the em- 
ployment stabilization plan or the studio's 
contract with the Publicists Guild. Sheehan 
sated that dismissal notices would be re- 
viewed with regard to manpower regula- 
tions. Republic had given dismissal notices 
to Walter Compton, publicity director, and 
to Len Boyd, Ambrose Barker, and Kenneth 
Porter of his staff, stating that a reorgani- 
zation of the company's publicity, adver- 
tising, and exploitation operations was 
planned. 

Protest was filed by SPG on behalf of 
Boyd, Barker and Porter. It is understood 
that the provisions cited would apply equal- 
ly to Compton. The committee presenting 
the SPG position met with Sheehan, Al Wil- 
son, labor relations contact, and Hortense 
Stahl of the studio's legal department. Wil- 
son stated that Republic has not subscribed 
to the area plan and that the motion picture 
industry plan would not be effective until 
July 18. 

Lesley Mason, chairman of SPG commit- 
tee and a member of the WMC labor man- 
agement sub-committee, explained that em- 
ployment of the stabilization plan had been 
mandatory throughout the Southern Cali- 
fornia area as of July 1, and that special 
features agreed upon for extended availability 
certificates in the motion picture industry 
were to become effective July 18. 



I have come to depend upon you. It is im- 
possible for me to estimate the value of the 
help we are getting and, I hope, will continue 
to get from all you people in the enter- 
tainment industry. No other group can bet- 
ter sell the need for sacrifice. In view of the 
huge job that lies ahead, let me now call 
upon you to give us more help than ever be- 
fore." Morgenthau declared that those in 
the entertainment business "can do more, 
as individuals, to raise money and to build 
spirit than almost any other single group 
anywhere." 

Thanks of Servicemen 

The thanks of our servicemen for the en- 
tertainment made available to them by the 
show world were conveyed by Brig. -Gen. 
Frederick Henry Osborn, chief of Special 
Services, U. S. Army. Speaking at a lunch- 
eon session, Gen. Osborn assured those in 
show business that the armed forces of 
the nation "depend on you more than you 
realize." He said the show world had won 
"the gratitude, the love and the admira- 
tion" of the American soldiers. According 
to Gen. Osborn, the work of the nation's en- 
tertainment agencies will be "more important 
than ever" after the war. 

In touching on Army films being made by 
the Government, Gen. Osborn said that such 
pictures "should be shown the public only 
if and when the public wants to see them." 
"Anything else would be a denial of the 
democracy we are defending," he declared. • 

Other luncheon speakers who recognized 
the power of the show world in the war 
a;rainst the Axis were Ted R. Gamble, as- 
sistant to Morgenthau and national director 
of the War Finance Division of the Treasury, 
and Bert Lytell. 

Gamble's Salute to Trade 

Gamble saluted show business for "the 
magnificent job" it was doing "in bringing 
to the American people the true story of 
the war and for making them more aware 
of the great issues involved." He singled 
out the film industry for special praise. 
"We need you and need you badly," he said. 
The financial mobilization of the nation 
could not have been successful without "the 
wholehearted help of the theaters," Gamble 
added. Increase in the number of theaters 
acting a6 Stamp and Bond issuing agencies 
was held necessary to raise the quota sought 
in the coming Bond drive. 

Pledging all the entertainment world's re- 



sources to the Government in its hour of 
need, Lytell called upon show people at home 
to enlist as "soldiers in greasepaint" to 
bolster the national morale. 

Schaefer opened the conference with a 
silent tribute to members of the show busi- 
ness killed in the war. 

The WAC chairman referred to the con- 
ference as "only the beginning of a great 
movement." He said entertainment was a 
national asset and indispensable in wartime. 

Winthrop W. Aldrich spoke on the role of 
the entertainer in the future plans of the 
National War Fund, of which he is chair- 
man. He said the services of the show 
world were vital to the fund's campaign to 
raise $125,000,000. 

NEIC Program Approved 

Following completion of the permanent 
organizational set-up for the council in New 
York and other major entertainment centers, 
the delegates unanimously approved the NEIC 
program with certain amendments. Also 
endorsed by the conference was a pledge 
binding every person making his living from 
show business to donate "an average mini- 
mum of six weeks per year or an equivalent 
of 36 performances or 36 days' work" to 
the entertainment of those in the service 
and on the home front as an aid to morale 

The principles of the NEIC were embodied 
in a resolution presented' to the conference 
by Cagney. 

It was revealed at the meeting that in ex- 
cess of 75,000 members of the amusement 
industry are in the armed forces. 

Besides those already mentioned, others 
at the conference included Vera Allen, Adrian 
McCalman, Paul N. Turner, Richard MeCann 
Oliver Sayler, Merritt E. Tompkins, Ruth 
Richmond, Phil Gordon, Leo Brecher Her- 
man M. Levy, Barclay Leathern, Paul' Hein- 
ecke, Lillian Hellman, E. C. Mills Alan 
Corelli, Augusta Ocker, Robert J. O'Donnell 
Herman Gluekman, Arthur Mayer, Al Hard- 
ing, Jack Alicoate, William A. Fricke Mar- 
garet Speaks. 



Held on Bank Night Charge 

Whiting, Ind. — Carroll Bradley, 
manager of Indiana-Illinois circuit 
Hoosier theater, was released on 
$100 bail, after his arrest for per- 
mitting Bank Night in his theater. 



RKO Radio to Boost 
Top Pix Pre-selling 

(Continued from Page 1) 

publicity, told the delegates at yes- 
terday's final session of the twelfth 
annual sales meeting at the Waldorf- 
Astoria. 

"We will back up every big pic- 
ture with a point-of-sale explotf* j 
tion campaign spearheaded direcix I 
the individual box-offices," said Mc- 
Cormick. "We plan to make exten- 
sive use of radio throughout the 
year in addition to increased news- 
paper coverage which the company 
considers as the first line of box- 
office defense. 

"Although the 'Hitler's Children' campaign 
represented the largest individual motion 
picture promotional expense in the history 
of the industry, our newspaper campaign was 
more than doubled over any previous cam- 
paign," said McCormick. 

Use of national and fan mags, will be 
increased, RKO's ad chief declared. 

McCormick called the delegates' attention 
to the fact that the shortly to be released 
"Behind the Rising Sun" will get the same 
promotional treatment which proved so ef- 
fective for "Hitler's Children." 

Homeward trek of the RKO delegates be- 
gan last night. Many stayed over, how- 
ever, and will leave today and tomorrow. 

National Screen Service was host to the 
delegates at a reception and buffet supper 
last night in the Waldorf's Wedgwood Room. 



Seen On Albany's Film Row 

Albany — Exhibs. checking in along 
film row in Albany early this week 
were two namesakes, Charlie Wil- 
son, Bijou, Troy and Charlie Wilson, 
Lake, Indian Lake, as well as Mr. 
and Mrs. Jerry LaRocque, Fairy- 
land, Warrensburg; Bob Yates, Lake, 
Lake George; Abraham Slutman, 
head Schine booker, together with 
Bernie Dimond and Elmer Sichel of 
his staff; Johnny Gardner, Colony 
and American, Schenectady; Mrs. T. 
J. Ferguson, Copake; Mrs. Frieda 
Klein, Hunter, Hunter; Carl King, 
Maiden, Williamstown, Mass.; Sid 
Kallet, Kallet Circuit, Oneida; Harry 
Lamont, Lamont Theaters, Green- 
ville; Al Bothner, Palace, Troy; 
George Thornton, Orpheum, Sauger- 
ties; Walter Wertime, Chester, Ches- 
tertown. 



Luncheon for Sam Wood 

Paramount will be host for Sam 
Wood, producer-director of "For 
Whom the Bell Tolls," at a trade- 
press luncheon tomorrow in the 
Yacht Room at the Hotel Astor. 



IN NEW POSTS 



BEN COHEN, manager, Telenews, Cincinnati. 
JOSEPH KLEIN, manager, Crown, New London, 
Conn. 

WILLIAM H. EARLES, Ross Federal branch man- 
ager, San Francisco. 

SCOTT HILLAM, Ross Federal branch manager, 
Salt Lake City. 

C. L. CLOWARD, Ross Federal Branch manager, 
Seattle. 

E. C. L'BANNON, Ross Federal branch manager, 

New Haven, 
JAY STERN, Ross Federal branch manager, 

Detroit. 

W. E. HERR, Ross Federal branch manager, In- 
dianapolis. 

HERBERT M. ISRAEL, field checking supervisor, 
Warners, Chicago. 








7&***&ULs 






IHEBEUTOUS 



M P ' I s 13 A INC. 










1 



THE MAR 



cT^FTlME current releases: "INVASION!" and "SHOW BUSINESS AT WAR 



t3«— 



WbQ*' 



In Today's Issue: The Equipment NewffSSbSbn 



Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 




(See Pages 9 to 11) 



The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



fc 



84, NO. 11 



NEW YORK. FRIDAY, JULY 16, 1943 



TEN CENTS 



DAVIS_ASKS MORE HELP FROM SHOW BIZ 

Para. Terms on "For Whom Bell Tolls "70-30 P. C. 



Editorial 



Wotta Week 

. . . for trade news 



By CHESTER B. BAHN 



VA/OTTA week for news, that which 
™" is just passing into trade history! 
Consider: . . . The National Entertainment 
Industry Council takes final form, sets a 
program for the duration and — importantly! 
— looks beyond to continued peace-time 
service. Election of George J. Schaefer to 
the national chairmanship is a fine tribute 
to the man — and no less to the industry 
with which he has been so prominently 
identified. And it is tacit acknowledgment 
by all show biz too, of the brilliant per- 
formance by the WAC. So Congrats., 
George — and Congrats., NEIC. . . . 

o 

PARAMOUNT, with a "so-proudly-we-hail" 
' flourish, finally unveils the long-awaited 
"For Whom the Bell Tolls," and the picture 
in the brilliance of its production, direction, 
performance, adaptation and Technicolor 
photography keeps faith with public, with 
exhibitor and with author. . . . And the 
latter was mighty important — make no mis- 
take about it. . . . Yes, FWTBT is another 
industry milestone, even without Wall 
Street's guess that it will roll up a 
$13,000,000 to $15,000,000 gross and with- 
out Paramount's announced 70 per cent 
terms. 



Minimum Scale for Adults 
$1.10; Children 75c; No 
Shorts, Games, Giveaways 



Paramount's sales policy for 
"For Whom the Bell Tolls," as 
outlined to the sales meeting at 
the Hotel Pierre 
yesterday by Neil 
Agnew and 
Charles M. Rea- 
gan, calls for: 

Terms of 70-30 
per cent; solo ex- 
hibition, without 
any supporting 
attraction — even 
a short is barred 
— or use of games, 
giveaways, prizes 
or premiums by 
the theater, and 
minimum admis- 
sion prices of 75c 
for children and adults and $1.10 

(Continued on Page 7) 




EUROPEAN WAR 
SEEN NEAR END 

May Close This Year, Says 
Barney Balaban 



NEIL AGNEW 



UNITED ARTISTS rolls up the curtain 
** at a swank Waldorf-Astoria preview 
on Walt Disney's distinctive, intriguing and 
persuasive treatise, Major Alexander P. de 
Seversky's "Victory Through Air Power," 
and Walt encores as a foremost industry 
pioneer. . . . Parenthetically, this: When 
bigger and better parties are given un- 
doubtedly Elsa Maxwell aga'n will head the 
receiving line — but that won't be right 
away. 

o 

DKO Radio stages a three-day sales meet- 
'* ing at the Waidorf-Astoria which, for 
enthusiasm over company and product and 
leadership, tops all predecessors. ... If you 
want to see a prime example of personal 
magnetism, make it a point to see Ned 
Depinet in action on the sales rostrum. 



DEPUBLIC gives the trade— all arms— 
,X something to think and talk about with 
the disclosure that it will buy radio time 
on a web, coast-to-coast, for its own radio 
show utilizing studio talent. . . . And many 
a radio fan will thank Herb Yates most 
(Continued on Page 6) 



WMC Has Super-List 
Of Essential Jobs 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Issuance of a super- 
list of critical occupations which 
might be included among all the 
various essential occupations is due 
to be announced this week-end by 
the . War Manpower Commission. 
This critical list is expected to be 
of far more importance to Selective 

(Continued on Page 5) 



Asserting that "this year may 
well be the most important one in 
our lives — it may well see the end 
of the war in Eu- 
rope," Barney 
Balaban, P a r a. 
p r e x y, pledged 
that the company 
will deliver the 
best product in 
i t s 31-year his- 
tory yesterday in 
addressing the 
Hotel Pierre sales 
meeting. 

Balaban de- 
clared that next 
year will see fin- 
a n c i a 1 indepen- 
dence for the 
company, through 
the elimination of 
senior securities, 



Tells NEIC Council OWI 
Will Be More Indebted to 
The Trade in Coming Years 




BARNEY BALABAN 



adding "I believe 



(Continued on Page 7) 



By LOU PELEGRINE 

FILM DAILY Staff Writer 

Disbandment of its domestic 
motion picture bureau as result 
of the sharp cut in Government 

funds for war information will com- 
pel the OWI to turn to the show 
world more than ever for assistance in 
discharging its duties. This was indi- 
cated yesterday by Elmer Davis, 
OWI director, in an add: ess at the 
closing session of the initial confer- 
ence of the National Entertainment 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Frisco Theaters Ask 
48-Hour Exemption 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

San Francisco — Charles M. Thall 
of FWC disclosed yesterday that an 

(Continued on Page 7) 



OWI Is Seeking Film Men 

Kastner to Go Overseas on Distribution 



Kuykendall Scores 
Gov't Regulation 



With reports current that Congress 
when it resumes after the present 
vacation recess will see several other 
proposals for film legislation uncov- 
ered in addition to the recently in- 
troduced Kilgore divorcement meas- 
ure in the Senate, Ed Kuykendall, 
MPTOA prexy, yesterday expressed 
unalterable opposition to any regula- 

(Continued on Page 5) 



Jules Alberti is Named 
Assistant to 20th-Fox Prexy 



Jules Alberti, well known in the- 
atrical and radio circles, and more 
recently associated with the Treas- 
ury Dept. as co-ordinator of star 

(Continued on Page 5) 



Two Arbitration Awards, 
New Clearance Complaint 



Two awards and a new clearance 
complaint were reported yesterday 
by the motion picture arbitration 
system. Albany tribunal reported 
that in the clearance action brought 
by Edsol Corp., operator of the Scotia 
Theater, Scotia, N. Y., arbitrator 
reduced the clearance of the Proc- 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Men with film distribution experi- 
ence and knowledge of a Continental 
country and its language are being 
sought by the OWI Overseas Motion 
Picture Bureau for assignments in 
presently occupied countries as the 
Allied armies re-take them from the 
Axis. Duties will be in connection 
with distribution of superimposed 
title and dubbed versions of Amer- 
ican films now being prepared. 

Notice of the Bureau's aim came 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Tom C. ClarU to be 
In L. A. on July 24 

Washington Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — Tom C. Clark, As- 
sistant Attorney General, plans to 
be in Los Angeles on July 24, it 
was learned yesterday. While at the 
present time Clark has no appoint- 
ments there, it was said at the 
D of J that he does expect to talk 
with Coast industry leaders regarding 
the New York consent decree. 



1W 



Friday, July 16, 1943 



DAILY 




Vol. 84, No. 11 Fri., July 16, 1943 10 Cents 



JOHN W. ALICOATE 



: : : Publisher 



DONALD M. MERSEREAU : General Manager 



CHESTER B. BAHN :::::: Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117. 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address- 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXTCO CITY— 
Marco-Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



FINANCIAL 



(Thursday, July 15) 



Trade Units Meet Today 
On War Loan Participation 



WAC personnel, comprising the 
Co-ordinating Committee, the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the Theaters 
Division, and Exhibitor Exchange 
committee chairmen, are meeting 
jointly today in the local Hotel As- 
tor, at the call of S. H. Fabian for 
the Theaters Division and George 
J. Schaefer for the Co-ordinating 
Committee, with invitations extend- 
ed by Executive vice-chairman Fran- 
cis S. Harmon. Degree of participa- 
tion in the third war loan campaign 
in September; formulation of an ade- 
nuate program of war information 
films; and relationship of WAC to 
rhe National Entertainment Indus- 
try Council are on the agenda, and 
an exchange of ideas on manpower 
and copper salvage probable. 

Ted Gamble, assistant to Treasury 
Secretary Henry Morgenthau, Jr., 
and National War Finance Director, 
will present facts on the third war 
loan. Harmon will speak on status 
of war information film program, 
and Schaefer is expected to discuss 
NEIC, its aims and purposes. 

Industrv leaders met with Elmer 
Davis, OWI director, at the Harvard 
Club vesterday in advance of today's 
WAC meeting. 



Rodqers Off to Chicago 
For Sales Conferences 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat 17y 4 17 17 — Vs 

Col. Picts. vtc. (2i/ 2 %) 19l/ 4 191/4 191/4 + 1/4 
Columbia Picts. pfd. 40 40 40 — l/ 2 

Con. Fm. Ind 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd... 17% 171/ 4 17l/ 4 — i/ 8 

East. Kodak 

do pfd 179V 2 1791/2 1791/2 — 1/2 

Cen. Prec. Eq 227/ 8 223,4 223^ — i/ 4 

Loew's, Inc 633/ 8 623^ 623/ 4 — i/ 2 

Paramount 29% 29 29—1 

RKO 10 9% 95/ 8 — 3/ 8 

RKO $6 pfd 99S/ 8 961/2 96y 2 — 33/ 8 

20th Century-Fox . 243,4 23'/ 8 24 + % 

20th Century-Fox pfd. 34 34 34 

Univ. Pict. pfd 

Warner Bros 15% 1514 15 3 / 8 — 1/4 

do pfd 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Warner Bros.' dbs. 6s48 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Monogram Picts. . . . 35/ 8 3% 3% 

Radio-Keith cvs. . . . 2% 2 2 — % 

Sonotone Corp 3% 33,4 3% 

Technicolor 15% 14% 15 + % 

Universal Picts 173/ 4 173/ 4 173,4— % 

N. Y. OVER-THE-COUNTER SECURITIES 

Bid Asked 
Roxy Thea. Bldg. 4s 1st '57 . 77% 80% 



HELP 



IF YOU ARE HAVING DIFFI- 
CULTY FINDING THE RIGHT 
PERSON FOR ANY VACANCY 
IN YOUR ORGANIZATION- 
CALL 
FRANK McGRANN 

POSITION SECURING BUREAU, INC. 

(AGENCY) 
331 Madison Ave. (43rd St.), N. Y. 

MURRAY HILL 2-6494 



William F. Rodgers, M-G-M gen- 
eral sales manager, leaves for Chi- 
cago today where he will preside at 
a meeting of company sales heads 
and district managers which will get 
under way Sunday. Home office ex- 
ecutives leaving tomorrow are: E. 
M. Saunders, assistant, eeneral sales 
manager; E. K. "Ted" O'Shea, East- 
ern sales manager; H. M. Richey. 
assistant to Rodgers, in charge of 
exhibitor relations; A. F. Cummings, 
branch operations manager; Harold 
Postman, assistant to Rodgers; How- 
ard Dietz. vice-president in charg-e 
of advertising and publicity; S. F. 
Seadler, advertising manager, and 
W. R. Ferguson, exploitation man- 
ager. 

Steps will be taken at the meet- 
ings at the Blackstone Hotel to 
carry out a nation-wide analysis of 
M-G-M accounts, based on the for- 
mula prepared at Cincinnati, where 
the first survey was made last week. 



Downs German Plane In 
First 6 Weeks of Action 

Staff Sgt. James J. O'Connell, 
manager of the RKO 23rd St. Theater 
until his enlistment in the Air Forces 
last year, was credited in news dis- 
patches from England yesterday with 
shooting down a Focke-Wulf 190 
within sight of the Dover cliffs when 
the Flying Fortress of which he is 
a gunner was attacked over the 
Channel. Rated Aerial Engineer, 
Sgt. O'Connell went overseas six 
weeks ago. 



More Than Ample Product 
Assured, Says Kalmenson 

San Francisco — Keeping the exhib. 
in operation, as well as keeping the 
whole industry organization going 
from the production front to the 
theater end, is the most important 
order of the day and the sales or- 
ganization in the field must bend 
every effort toward this objective, 
Ben Kalmenson, Warners general 
sales manager declared yesterday at 
the opening session of the company's 
regional sales meeting in the Mark 
Hopkins Hotel. 

As far as product is concerned, 
Kalmenson declared, there will be 
more than ample for every need. He 
said the better quality pictures now 
being turned out are not only ab- 
sorbing more playing time but also 
bringing more money to exhibitors 
than ever before. 

The meeting will continue through 
tomorrow. 



COMIDG and GOIRG 



WILLIAM F. RODGERS, Loew's vice prex) 
and sales chief, goes to Chicago today. 

CHARLES REED JONES, Republic ad-publicity 
chief, leaves for Chicago today. 



Republic Opens Chicago 
Sales Conference Today 



WB Not High Bidder 

Reports originating in legitimate 
theater circles that Warners were 
the high bidders, with an offer of 
$450,000, for the screen rights to 
"Junior Miss" were denied yesterday 
bv Jacob Wilk, the company's East- 
ern production manager. Wilk said 
Warners "have never had the slight- 
est idea of offering such a sum." 



Harold Lewis Joins Small 

West Coast Bureau of THE FIJ.M DAILY 

Hollywood — Sergt. Harold Lewis, 
honorably discharged from the Army 
because of his age, has joined Ed- 
ward Small as production manager. 
Before joining the Army, Lewis was 
studio manager for RKO-Pathe. 



Chicago — Second in Republic's cur- 
rent series of sales conferences opens 
today at the Drake Hotel, where H. 
J. Yates, Sr. and Republic President 
J. R. Grainger join Midwestern Dis- 
trict Sales Manager E. L. Walton and 
Southern District Sales Manager 
Merritt Davis, and exchange-men 
from these districts. 

Home office reps, at the conference 
include William Saal and Walter L. 
Titus, Jr. Charles Reed Jones is to 
attend tomorrow's session. He will 
also attend the sales meeting to be 
held July 22-23, at the studio; and 
will then remain on the Coast for 
two additional weeks prior to his 
return to New York. 



BETTE DAVIS left New York last night f< 
Boston to visit relatives for a few days, aftei 
which she will head west to start work in "Mr 
Skeffington." 

NAT WOLF, Cleveland zone manap? (or 
Warner Theaters; J. KNOX STRACHAN, r- 

tising manager, and CORP. CHARLES A.- _i(T 
formerly of the booking office in that city and 
now stationed at Camp Clayburn, La., are in 
New York. 

HARRY GOLDBERG, director of advertising 
and publicity for Warner Theaters, is in Wash- 
ington today and returns to New York ow 
Monday. 

JUDY GARLAND is due in Harrisburg, Pa. 
Monday for a USO-Camp Shows appearance a- 
the Carlisle Barracks. 

AL STEEN of THE FILM DAILY staff returns 
from a Kansas City vacation over the week-end: 

PAUL N. LAZARUS, JR., UA director of ad- 
vertising, publicity and exploitation, leaves to- 
day for Hollywood conferences with UA pro- 
ducers. 

KAY BROWN, Sam Coldwyn's new story-talen 
department head here, arrives from the Coasl 
next week. 

FRED A. ROHRS, PRC's Southeastern sal 
manager who has been in New York for severa 
days, returns today to his headquarters in Wash 
ington, and continues shortly for a biz swin 
through his territory. 

B. B. KREISLER, Universal's shorts and news 
reel head, leaves today for Cleveland and Pitts- 
burgh, and is scheduled to return to the h.o. 
on Monday. 

JACK BENNY, LARRY ADLER, ANNA LEE and 
WINNIE SHAW appeared for USO Camp Shows 
last night at Camp Shanks, Orangeburg, N. Y. 



MITCHEL CONERY, who conducts a seven 
theater circuit in the Albany territory, leaves 
tomorrow for a vacation in Canada, including 
the steamboat cruise down the Saguenay Trail. 

IRVING MENDELSOHN, Paramount booker in 
Albany, is back from a vacation to Cape Cod. 
while HERMAN RIPPS, Metro branch manager 
there, is at Pine Mountain. 



Two Resign from Columbia 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Mis. Ad Schulberg 
has resigned as Columbia's talent 
scout, and Jack Mulcahy has resign- 
ed as a member of the studio's pub- 
licity department. 



Urges Catholic Boycott of 
"Moscow" in Rochester 



Rochester — "Mission to Moscow" 
which opened at the Century here 
yesterday, was rapped in the Cath- 
olic Courier as "without doubt the 
greatest travesty on truth ever per- 
petrated on the American public." 
The Rev. John S. Randal, diocesan 
director of the Legion of Decency, 
warned, "instead of asking that the 
price of admission be refunded, our 
people should protest its Rochester 
showing by staying away." 



The Recognized 

Standard 

Reference 

Book of the 

Motion Picture Industry 




THE FILM YEAR BOOK 

Published by 

and given free with a 

year's subscription to 

THE FILM DAILY 

J 501 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 




STARRING 
OF THE ARMED FORCES - GEORGE MURPHY 



GEORGE TOBIAS-ALAN HALE-CHARLES BUTTERWORTH-KATE SMITH MBrWrKSM 



Directed by I 

Keep Selling The "Shangri La" Stamp Drive! 



LESLIE * Lt 

ay by Casey Robinson and Ca 
rig Berlin's "This is the Aim) 

fwueedtnrJACK L. WARN ER and HAL B. WALLIS 



V 



everything 
«/se /V 

swa'/ by J 
comparison . 



Mi-1 %g HOUXW<SOO THBApiS .]£= 




w 



DAILY 



Friday, July 16, 1943 



200 Honor Samson 
In Buffalo Monday 



Buffalo — More than 200 persons, 
including delegations from Albany, 
Gloversville, Binghamton, Elmira, 
S y r a c u s e , 
Rochester and the 
New York home 
office of 20th Cen- 
tu:y-Fox, are ex- 
pected here Mon- 
day for the Var- 
iety Club's testi- 
monial dinner in 
Hotel Statler for 
Sydney Samson, 
who has been pro- 
moted from Buf- 
falo branch man- 
ager to general 
manager for Can- 
ada of 20th-Fox. 
Film men from 
Pittsburgh, 
Cleveland and Canadian points also 
have signified they will attend. 

E, K. (Ted) O'Shea, M-G-M divi- 
sion manager, and Dave Miller of 
Cleveland, Universal district man- 
ager, will divide the toastmaster job. 

Assisting Chairman Phil Fox, Co- 
lumbia branch manager, on the din- 
ner committee are Elmer F. Lux, 
RKO branch manager, as treasurer; 
Ralph Maw, Metro branch manager, 
as secretary, and nearly two score 
exhibs., branch bosses, circuit heads 
and other Film Row fixtures. 

Women of the film industry and 
wives of film men will have a dinner 
simultaneously in the same hotel for 
Mis. Samson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samson already have 
received a sterling candelabra, the 
gift of the 20th-Fox exchange staff, 
and a parchment scroll signed by 
every member of the staff. 




SYDNEY SAMSON 



55th St. to Midfilm. Inc. 

Midfilm, Inc. has taken over the 
management of the 55th Street Play- 
house. John Bullock is president 
and Campbell Staples, vice-president 
of Midfilm. 




JULY 16 

Mary Philbin iBarbara Stanwyck 

llona Massey Cinger Rogers 
Cus Harris 

JULY 17 

James Cagney Al Bondy 

Jack Conway Herschel Stuart 

Frank Whitbeck Helen Mason 

John Carroll 

JULY 18 

Lou Menelik Richard Dix 

William Cabanne Gene Lockhart 

Keith Richards Lupe Velez 

Mildred Coles Paul Perez 

Phyllis Brooks Charles A. Stimson 




PhtfW.D, 



When the Heat Is On 

• • © WHEN the heat, whether climatic or competitive, is on, — 

you'll notice real showmanship really blossom Striking examples are 

furnished via this week's developments F'rinstance, the Paramount 

promotional team had a solid and vital job on its hands, recognized that 

it had to be done, and set forth promptly to do it With Little Old 

New Yorkers, along with the habitual transients, including the ebb and 
flow of lads in the armed forces, looking a la Diogenes for as much 
as an honest zephyr, and fancies therefore turned to the out-of-doors 
(even to the point of WAVES rowing gobs around on Central Park lakes). 

it has been a job flagging folks' attention Consider, too, that the 

entertainment-seeker has a plethora of cinematic powerhouses to choose 

from currently on Ye Great White Way, environs and nabes But 

weather or competition notwithstanding. Paramount treated the town 
to such a whale/ of a rugged campaign on "For Whom the 

Bell Tolls" that it dominated the Metropolitan scene Even the most 

precipitous and near-sighted taxi-driver couldn't help but see, like the 
rest of the populace, the grand spotting of billboards in key and costly, 

as well as ultra-strategic, spots o'er this city Now, ad men are 

wont to use the phrase "shouting from the housetops" to describe Big 

Bertha campaigns designed to override all other biz adversaries 

Paramount's billboard campaign not only shouted from housetops, but 

the big building tops and other surfaces It certainly, — dovetailed 

as it was into all the other hullabaloo raised in press and on the air — , 
made pic-goers chafe at the bit to pay their "toll" at the b.o. for the 

"Bell" The trade campaign was likewise of the "genus blitz," and 

only exhibs. in a coma could be unimpressed with the film's merit 

All the concentration of Bob Gillham & Co. upon the "Bell," didn't neglect 
even for a moment the ace selling of a grand companion Para, pic, "So 
Proudly We Hail" 

▼ T T 

• • • ANOTHER magnificent promotional job sprang up co- 
incident with the RKO Radio convention this week, engineered by 

S. Barret McCormick and his lads In this instance the entire trade 

was flagged on company's 1943-44 product, and, additionally, the boys 
attending the confab from near and far saw for themselves, and were 
inspired and convinced, that both the company and its producers are 
going to wrap up reel and real goods for their vending in the approach- 
ing season Confidence is an infectious thing This corner 

had occasion during the RKO Radio meet to chin with scores of 

delegates We're saying in all bed-rock sincerity, and without a 

modicum of hooey, that we have never seen a bunch of distribs. more 

pleased with product, prospects and potentialities It'll be tough 

for customers to say anything but "yes!" to that crew They're 

SOLD And the trade press campaign had a big hand in that re- 
sult _ _ _ 

• • • AND speaking of advertising, another facet H. Allen 

Smith starts off his "Close-up" of Roy Rogers in Life Magazine with this 

paragraph: "The manufacture of personalities through the process 

known as The Old Build-up has been one of Hollywood's most noted 
contributions to world civilization No better example of the hand- 
tailored human exists today than Roy Rogers, who has been trumpeted 

in the splendid title. 'King of the Cowboys' " Interpreting for the 

benefit of exhibs., what Br'r Smith means is this: Not since Hector 

was a pup has there been a selling campaign quite like that Republic 

has given R. R And to exhibs. that's as important (maybe even 

more) than the Rogers pic on Life's cover 

T T T 

• • • AVENGE PEARL HARBOR! 



IN NEW POSTS 



WILLIAM REINHARDT, manager, Metro Theater. 
San Juan, P. R. 

CEORCE FETTICK, shorts booker, Warner Cir- 
cuit, Philadelphia. 

E. M. OROWITZ, film booker, Varbalow Cir- 
cuit, Camden, N. J. 

FRANK L. NEWMAN, JR., head booker Hamrick- 
Evergreen, Seattle. 

CHARLES THOMSON, booker, Columbus Stampe. 
Circuit, Philadelphia. 

JACK GOLDMAN, manager, Victoria, PI*' 'I- 
phia. 

STANLEY SLEVEN, assistant manager, Earle. 
Philadelphia. 

EDWARD ROSEN, assistant manager, Diamond 
Philadelphia. 

LEONARD FELDMAN, assistant manager, Rivoli. 
Roxbury, Mass. 

AARON IBERKOWITZ, M & P Circuit, Boston. 

LESTER COLE, assistant manager, Paramount 
Theater, New Haven. 

RUSSELL DERACEN, assistant, Whalley, New 
Haven. 

AL HERMANN, salesman, Warners, New Haven 

RICHARD DAVIS, manager, Harbor, York Harbor 
Me. 

SID BLOOMFIELD 
delphia. 

CHARLES E. McCARTHY, field checking super- 
visor, Warners, Minneapolis. 

KAY BROWN, to head Sam Coldwyn story-talent 
dept. 

MRS. HAZEL WIXTED, assistant manager al 

the Regent, Rochester, N. Y. 
GEORGE KRASKA, relief manager, Loew circuit. 

Boston. 

LEONARD KRASKA, manager, Strand, Boston. 
RALPH REDMOND, manager, Lake, Chicago. 
DAVE COLD, manager, Mode, Chicago. 
)ACK REED, manager, Crown, Chicago. 

MILLARD McKIRCAN, manager, Grand, Piano 

III. 
JACK WITHERS, salesman, RKO, Pittsburgh. 
JOSEPH FREEMAN, city manager, Warners. 

Johnstown, Pa. 

BRUCE CODSHAW, manager, Ridge, Chicago. 
RUSSELL MOSE, manager, Lincoln, Danville, III. 
JONAS PERLBERG, Essaness Circuit, Chicago 
GLENN SHIPP, manager, Darb, Manfeno, III. 



city salesman, PRC, Phila- 



Relax Blackout in P. R. 

San Juan (By Air Mail) — Theatei 
marquees in Puerto Rico may now 
be lighted at night except where the 
lights can be seen from the sea. In- 
creased grosses resulted from the 
relaxed blackout rules. 



STORKS 



It's a son for the Cecil Fischers 
Mother is the former Paula Green- 
wald, for 10 years secretary to Al 
Deane at Paramount and more re 
cently secretary to C. B. Odell there 
Father is a naval architect. 



Ashland, Ky. — A daughter, Joe 
Ann, was born to Mr. and Mrs. A. J 
Sexton, Sexton Theater Co. 



Philadelphia — It's a daughter for 
Milton Lewis, manager of the Dante 
here. 



A six-and-a-half -pound son wasj \ . 
born in St. Vincent's Hospital here L 
to Tom Mead, co-editor of Universal t 
Newsreel, and his wife. Latter anc t 
the new son and heir are reported 
doing nicely, while Tom passes out 
the cigars. 



Sol 



.Circuit's Argument for Re- 
tention Brings Sharp Re- 
joinder irom Biddle's Aide 



Friday, July 16, 1943 



#$ 



DAILY 



Schine Disposal Hearing in Buffalo in September 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — The U. S. District 
Court for Western New York at its 
September term in Buffalo will prob- 
ably hold a hearing to determine with 
' ■$ diligence the Schine circuit has 
'<■ pAipted to dispose of the 15 the- 
aters it was directed to unload, it 
was said here yesterday by Tom C. 
Clark, Assistant Attorney General. 
Six of the 15 houses have been sold 
by the Gloversville, N. Y., chain. 

The court at the hearing will also 
take into account the condition of 
these theaters, their saleability, etc. 
The usual procedure of the D of J's 
anti-trust division in a case like this 
is to suggest to the court that a trus- 
tee be appointed to dispose of the 
property when the owner of the prop- 
erty fails to do so, it was said. 

As to the argument advanced last 
week by the circuit that it should be 
allowed to retain these theaters in 
view of the fact that Paramount, and 
other big theater-owners were per- 
mitted to add to their theater hold- 
ings between the time of entry of the 
New York equity suit, in 1938, and 
the entrance into the provisions of 
the consent decree, in 1940, Clark 
charged that Schine "bought the the- 
aters in order to destroy evidence, 
while the others bought theaters in 
order to maintain their competitive 
standing in the industry." 

Clark said that the Schine Circuit, 
after the initiation of the anti-trust 
suit against it in 1939, bought out 
theater operators who had com- 
plained against the circuit "in order 
to silence them." The complaints had 
dealt with clearance, the opportunity 
to get new pictures and other com- 
petitive matters, said Clark. 



U. S. JCofC Launches Drive 
"To Smash 7th Column" 



. Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — Nation-wide 'Smash 
the Seventh Column' campaign to be 
conducted in some 850 cities by the 
U. S. Junior Chamber of Commerce 
-was launched yesterday at a lun- 
cheon in Washington's Hotel Stat- 
ler coincident with the premiere of 
the M-G-M Pete Smith short "Sev- 
- enth Column" at Loew's Palace. 
More than 200 government officials 
and civic leaders attended the lun- 
cheon. On behalf of Pete Smith, 
| Anita Louise reveived a plaque 
awarded by the Junior Chamber "in 
recognition of the film's outstanding 
contribution to the cause of safety." 



Gottlieb's First for Warners 

f West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — "Deep Valley" will 
be Alex Gottlieb's first production 
at Warner Bros. John Ridgely has 
been assigned to a leading role in 
the John Garfield starrer. Delmer 
Daves will direct. 



To The Colors 



* COMMISSIONED * 

STIRLINC SILLIPHANT, assistant to Spyros 
Skouras, president of 20th-Fox, commissioned 
an ensign, USNR. 

IRA BECK, USA, formerly assistant manager, 
Loew's Rochester, Rochester, commissioned 
a 2nd lieutenant. 

HARRY JORDAN, USA, former manager, Trans- 
Lux, Philadelphia, commissioned a 2nd lieu- 
tenant. 

MELZER DICCS, USN, formerly, Cates Theater, 
Portsmouth, Va., commissioned an ensign. 
— • — 

• PROMOTED • 

PAUL FOODS, USA, formerly, Poli Theater, Wor- 
cester, Mass., to lieutenant. 

ELLIOTT KRONISH, USA, formerly, Poli, Wor- 
cester, Mass., to warrant officer. 

JAMES FLAHERTY, son of Frank Flaherty, presi- 
dent Reel Fellows Club, Chicago, to cor- 
poral. 

CORP. WILLIAM ). HICKEY, USA, formerly of 
THE FILM DAILY, to Sergeant. 

PROMOTED .. — .. — — — 

MAJ. WILLIAM T. POWERS, USA, formerly head 
of the National Theaters purchasing dept., 
San Francisco, to lieutenant colonel. 



* TO OFFICERS SCHOOL * 

BERNARD TEITEL, son of Abe Teitel, indie, 
film distributor, Chicago. 
— • — 

* ARMY * 

CARLETON McVARISH, exploitation man, Yankee 
Network, Boston. 

JOSEPH KERINS, Hart Theater, Wilkes-Barre, 
Pa. 

MARTIN PADUCK, Hart, Wilkes-Barre, Pa 

EDDIE SECUIN, B & K publicity staff, Chi- 
cago. 

TED GRANT, manager, Lake, Chicago. 



IRVING BERGEN, manager, Mode, Chicago. 

GEORCE RUGG, operator, Mode, Chicago. 

WILL COLE, manager, Crown, Chicago. 

JAMES THOMSON, manager, Apollo, Chicago. 

W. E. YEAGLEY, operator, Liberty Theater, 
Confluence, Pa. 

CHET WOERNER, treasurer of Warner's Mast- 
baum, Philadelphia. 

STANLEY SMITH ERS, shorts booker, Warner 
Circuit, Philadelphia. 

FRANK CHRISTIE, head booker, Hamrick-Ever- 
green, Seattle. 

WILLIAM KANEFSKY, assistant manager, Earle, 
Philadelphia. 

GERALD W. MYERS, assistant manager, Mary- 
land, Hagerstown, Md. 

* NAVY * 

]AMES MULRANEY, Comerford, Wilkes-fiarre, 

Pa. 
BRUNO CAPAGRECO, Avon Theater, Syracuse, 

N. Y. 

* COAST GUARD * 

|OHN ZOMNIR, M-G-M office manager, Pitts- 
burgh. 

* WAC * 

LYNN HICKMAN, Essaness Circuit, Chicago. 
— • — 

* SERVICE TRANSFERS * 

NATE R. SODIKMAN, USA, formerly Monogram 
branch manager, Albany, transferred to 
Automatic Anti-Aircraft Division, Camp 
Stewart, Ga. 

CORP. MORRIS COHN, USA, former Columbia 
salesman, Albany, transferred to the Mili- 
tary Police Battalion, Elizabeth, N. J. 

CLIFFORD DWICK, USN, former manager, Hell- 
man's Drive-ln, Albany, transferred to man- 
agement of the camp theater, Camp Samp- 
son, N. Y. 



Super-List of Essential lobs 

WMC Expected to Announce It This Week 



(Continued ft 

Service and USES offices than the 
old lists of essential activities and 
jobs, but recall of the latter lists is 
not looked for. 

The present lists will "remain in 
force insofar as they are forceful," 
an official of the WMC Essential Ac- 
tivities Committee said yesterday. 
That wording indicates the aware- 
ness of the policy makers in Wash- 
ington that many local boards are 
not paying too much attention to the 
dicta which come from the Capitol. 

The present national lists contain a total 
of about 2,100 job listing's, whereas the 
new listing' of critical jobs — chemists, phy- 
sicists, etc. — will contain only about 250 
jobs — if that many. WMC hopes that it 
will carry far more weight with local officials 
than does the present list. 

Workers in several of the activities pres- 
ently held essential will probably be en- 
tirely omitted from the new list. Some 
broadcasting personnel may be included, but 
at least one official is certain that no mo- 
tion picture workers will be included in the 
new list. The old list of essential activities 
will not. however, be reduced. 

The current lists, said the WMC official, 
have the values — first, they aid Selective 



om Page 1) 

Service boards in determining who should 
be considered for deferment, and. second, 
they are a guide to local WMC and USES 
officials in determining upon job transfers. 

WMC officials here are increasingly frank 
about admitting the ineffectiveness of these 
lists whenever local Selective Service boards 
refuse to be bound by them. There is a 
strong movement toward decentralization in 
the agency, of course, and local boards have 
never actually been accountable to anyone 
for their actions. Aside from draft mat- 
ters. WMC regional officials have far more 
power than formerly, although they may not 
as yet officially disregard the national lists. 

They can, however, add to these lists for 
their own regions, or for specific areas within 
those regions. Thus, if in a certain section 
there were a shortage of theater managers, 
for instance, the area WMC director, with 
the approval of his regional chief, could 
grant theater managers the status of employes 
on the essential activities list and, in many 
cases could enlist the aid of the state 
Selective Service director to try to get de- 
ferments for theater managers in the areas. 

In the meantime, Washington is awaiting 
another policy shift by Selective Service to 
rule out the induction of pre-Pearl Harbor 
fathers and make even more definite the 
policy against taking men over 38. Some an- 
nouncement along these lines is expected 
shortly. 



Polish Pix in New Britain 

New Britain, Conn. — The Roxy, 
closed for the hot months, will open 
occasionally for spot bookings of 
Polish pictures. 



Gorham House to Kuhbus 

Renwick, la. — The Ren theater at 
Renwick has been purchased by Har- 
ley H. Kuhbus. V. E. Gorham for- 
merly operated. 



Kuykendall Scores 
Gov't Regulation 



(Continued from Page 1) 

tory bill as being "of no benefit to 
the real independents." 

Kuykendall, here from his Colum- 
bus, Miss., home for today's WAC 
parley, said that his recent comment 
on the Kilgore measure (Film Daily, 
July 8), was applicable to all variety 
of legislation for industry regula- 
tion by the Government. 

As for divorcement, Kuykendall 
demanded, "Who will it benefit?" He 
added that the MPTOA has said 
"very little" about divorcement as 
such, and that its membership "has 
various opinions." 

Kuykendall conferred yesterday 
with organizational leaders on the 
legislative situation and other trade 
problems. A statement of MPTOA's 
position may be released today. 



Jules Alberti is Named 
Assistant to 20th-Fox Prexy 



(Continued from Page \) 

talent for War Bond rallies, net- 
work programs, and other similar 
activities, has been appointed assis- 
tant to Spyros P. Skouras, president 
of 20th-Fox. He succeeds Stirling 
Silliphant who leaves for active 
service as Ensign in the U. S. Navy. 
Alberti will also be aide to Larry 
Kent, executive assistant to Skouras. 
Alberti will assume his new du- 
ties Aug. 2, and in addition has of- 
fered his services as voluntary con- 
sultant to the New York War Fin- 
ance Committee. Prior to joining 
the Treasury Dept., Alberti was a 
Blue network producer-director. 



Vonesh Replaces Burns 

Chicago — Otto Vonesh, has been 
elected to the executive board of the 
Chicago Operators Union, succeed- 
ing Bobby Burns, now in war work. 



WEDDING BELLS 



Scranton, Pa. — Announcement has 
been made of the engagement of 
Joan Ellen Conway, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. William A. Monahan, 
La Port, Pa., to Ensign Michael B. 
Comerford, USNR, son of Mrs. M. 
B. Comerford and the late M. B. 
Comerford, former general manager 
of the Comerford Enterprises. 



Pittsburgh — Marriage of Mildred 
Cohen, sister of Harold Cohen, dra- 
matic critic for the Pittsburgh Press, 
to Lt. Gerald Kramer, bomhardier 
in the Army Air Force, took place 
at the Schenley Hotel. 



1W 



Friday, July 16, 1943 



DAILY 



Davis Asks for More 
Help From Show Biz 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Industry Council at the Hotel Wal- 
dorf-Astoria. 

"We are going to be much more in- 
debted to you in the course of the 
coming year because we haven't 
much of our own to go on," Davis 
told leaders in every branch of the 
amusement business gathered to 
adopt a program for complete dedi- 
cation of the show world to the na- 
tion's war effort. 

Davis asserted that the OWI would 
be able to carry on its domestic ac- 
tivities under its reduced budget 
"only by passing a good deal of the 
work that we have been doing back 
to the industries, the motion picture 
industry, radio and various others." 
He said that the OWI had found 
every one of those industries "quite 
eager to co-operate and take on the 
added load." 

Deplores Lowered Morale 

Deploring the symptoms of low- 
ered morale that recently have mani- 
fested themselves on the home front, 
Davis asked the aid of the amuse- 
ment business in helping to create 
on the home front a spirit compar- 
able to that existing in the armed 
forces. He said it was "a tremen- 
dous psychological problem" which 
the entertainment industry had it 
within its means to solve. 

"To a considerable extent the entertain- 
ment industries in one way or another may 
be able to give us the answer," he asserted. 
"They will give us the answer in two ways — 
the first in their old and regular business of 
providing entertainment which will give the 
people the necessary relaxation which will 
enable them to work harder during working 
hours and, secondly, in messages they can 
carry from the Government to the people 
about the importance of the war effort and 
the specific things the people have to do to 
have the machine work." 

The OWI director hinted at what might 
be expected of show business in the job of 
bolstering the morale of the people when he 
said that "we have got to carry the realiza- 
tion to everybody in this country that the 
primary business of every member of the 
population of the United States is the busi- 
ness of war until the war is won, that that 
is the thing we have got to concentrate on, 
that everything else should be secondary to 
that, that every one of us has got to spend 
his best efforts on that and that we cannot 
afford to let up till complete and final victory 
is absolutely in our grasp." Davis conceded 
that the entertainment business might be 
better qualified than he to find the means "to 
keep the American people in a mentally 
and spiritually happy condition." 

Must Restore Better Balanee 

The delegates were told that ways must be 
found "to restore a better balance in the 
thinking of the people, making them realize 
that this is a long war, an enormous war, 
and that early victories, however splendid, 
are by no means the final answer." 

In a message to President Roosevelt in 
behalf of "more than 600,000 persons" rep- 
resented at the conference the delegates 
pledged the entertainment world to "lojjpl 



Who Said Morale? 

Leo Jacobi of Warners' New York 
Metropolitan sales force has a son 
who's been seeing action in the 
Guadalcanal sector. In a recent let- 
ter to his folks he urged THEM to 
"keep your chin up"! 



Wotta Week 

. . . for trade news 

(Continued from Page 1) 
sincerely for the assurance that the show 
will suffer from no "commercial" interrup- 
tion. 

o 

^"NF major import, too, although it hap- 
^■^ pened across the blue-green Atlantic, 
is the Parliamentary disclosure that the 
British Government via action without prece- 
dent has banned a one-man monopoly in 
the British trade. . . . The particular situa- 
tion was pointed up in this corner on 
June 21, if you're interested. . . . And if 
you're not, there were those in the seats 
of the mighty who were — decidedly and 
emphatically. 

o 

A ND, in rapid review, those are only a 
'*» few of the week's news highlights. 
. . . Consider further: Tom C. Clark, As- 
sistant Attorney General, disclosed (via a 
FILM DAILY "exclusive") that he plans 
to talk over the New York consent decree 
with execs, here, on the Coast and else- 
where. . . . Also that the D of J will 
press for the sale of nine Schine theaters. 
. . . Locally, came the tip that a superseding 
indictment in the film extortion case will 
accuse more Chicago men. . . . The Allied- 
Independent Theater Owners of Iowa- 
Nebraska (unaffiliated) told the Attorney 
General it backed Allied on divorcement... 
(another FILM DAILY "exclusive," by the 
way). ... A group of New England indies 
asked the WPB to probe alleged film 
"hoarding" by distributors. . . . Yes, indeed, 
wotta week for news! 



service in every way to the furthest prose- 
cution of the war." 

"We have unanimously dedicated ourselves 
to an intensified and complete program in 
support of all phases of the war work at 
home and abroad — a stand we fully intend 
to carry on through the peace years to fol- 
low in the rehabilitation of the mental and 
physical structures of our world," the mes- 
sage stated. "We are in action. We are 
fully mobilized and our resources are yours 
as commander-in-chief in the tireless service 
of winning this fight and forcing our ene- 
mies to their knees in unconditional sur- 
render." 

In presenting a proposed program for the 
entertainment of servicemen and civilians as 
a means of building morale, Philip Loeb of 
Actors Equity disclosed that through its co- 
ordinating committee the NEIC intended to 
devote a major part of its attention to the 
needs of the armed forces and the drives 
of the Treasury Department and the National 
War Fund. 

Sees Better Relations With Public 

George J. Sehaefer, who presided, expressed 
the hope that out of the conference would 
come "not only a better understanding with- 
in the entertainment industry but a better 
understanding between the industry and the 
public." 

"There must be some additional educa- 
tion to bring into line more small theaters 
to assist in the war effort," Harry Brandt. 
ITOA head, told the delegates. He paid 
tribute to American exhibitors as "fine pa- 
triotic individuals." 

Herman M. Levy, general counsel of the 
MPTOA, said that more theaters in rural 
districts should be tapped to serve as bond- 
issuing agencies. He asserted that the full 
value of the small independent exhibitors to 
the war effort was not being realized. 

A campaign to educate the nation on 
"what the entertainment industry is" as a 
means of winning greater prestige for show 
business was urged by Walt Dennis of the 
National Association of Broadcasters. 
Co-ordination Essential 

The essentiality of co-ordinated effort on 
the part of every branch of show business 
was emphasized by John C. Plinn of the 
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sci- 
ences and the Society of Independent Motion 
Picture Producers. 

NEIC representation on the War Labor 
Board was advocated by William Feinberg. 
secretary. Local 802, Associated Musicians 



Two Arbitration Awards, 
New Clearance Complaint 

(Continued from Page 1) 

tors, State and Plaza Theaters, 
Schenectady, from 49 to 42 days 
over the Scotia. He ruled that the 
clearance of 35 days between the 
first-run houses and the Plaza be 
reduced to 28 days but the 14 days 
between the Plaza and the Scotia 
remain. 

In the clearance case brought by 
Newsreel, Inc., operator of the 
Square, Medford, Mass., arbitrator 
set maximum clearance of Maiden, 
Mass. at 50 days. He disclaimed au- 
thority to divide first-runs evenly be- 
tween the two days as requested in 
the complaint. 

New clearance action was filed in 
Detroit by D. L. Kolbride and L. G. 
Hillier, operating the Beverly The- 
ater, against Loew's, Paramount and 
20th-Fox claiming that clearance 
granted the Tower Theater was un- 
reasonable and asking the arbitrator 
to establish a reasonable maximum. 



Schine Subsidiary Intervenes 
In Oswego Clearance Case 

Buffalo — Although the Schine cir- 
cuit was named a defendant, along 
with four distribs., Munmad The- 
ater Corp., has intervened for three 
Schine houses at Oswego, the Os- 
wego, Strand and Capitol, in the 
clearance brought on behalf of Kal- 
let's State at Fulton. Distrib. de- 
fendants are Loew's, 20th-Fox, RKO 
and Vitagraph. 

Complainant seeks reduction of present 
14-day clearance of the Oswego houses over 
the State to immediately after Oswego, and 
in no event more than one day after. 

Intervenors have filed in two other clear- 
ance cases. They are: 

Dipson Theaters, Inc., for the Amherst 
and S. G. Theater Corp., Gloversville, for 
Schine's Granada, in case brought for Basil's 
Varsity, Buffalo. 

Cataract Theater Corp., for Hayman's 
Strand and Cataract, Niagara Falls, in case 
brought on behlf of Basil's LaSalle, Niagara 
Falls. 



Basil Case Hearing July 26 

Buffalo — First hearing has been set 
for July 26, and Roland H. Tills has 
been named arbitrator in clearance 
case brought on behalf of Basil's 
Apollo, Buffalo, asking reduction of 
present 14-day clearance of Shea's 
Elmwood over the Apollo to immed- 
iately following the Elmwood. 

of Greater New York. Feinberg called upon 
the Government and industry to co-operate 
in the establishment of a program of "mor- 
ale entertainment" for defense workers in 
the nation's drive to step up war production. 
He charged that the morale of the industrial 
worker was being sadly neglected'. 

Paul Moss, license commissioner, was a 
guest of the conference at its luncheon ses- 
sion. 

Wednesday evening was set as the date of 
the first meeting of the co-ordinating com- 
mittee named on the first day of the con- 
ference. The next meeting of the NEIC will 
be held in August. 

The delegates adopted a tentative ad- 
ministrative budget of $30,150 submitted by 
Brandt, who is in charge of NEIC finances. 
Appointment of a finance committee to be 
named by the co-ordinating committee was 
recommended by Brandt. 



Eden Establishes Offices 

Washington — Fred J. Eden has 
established law offices at 819-823 
Investment Building for active prac- 
tice in all District courts except- 
ing bankruptcy. 



« 



REVIEWS 

"Hers to Hold" 



» 



with Deanna Durbin, Joseph Cotten 
Universal 94 Mins. 

ROMANTIC COMEDY SHOULD BOOST 
DURBIN'S STOCK; PIC HAS EXCELLENT 
BOX OFFICE POSSIBILITIES. 

Deanna Durbin completes her romantic 
coming-of-age in "Hers to Hold." In the 
process she brings untold joy to her ad- 
mirers and promises of heavy grosses to the 
sxhibitor. & \ 

In her latest film Miss Durbin J 

forth a fully-blossomed personality with a 
warmth, a poise and an assurance never 
before flashed by the singing star. Alsc 
evident are considerable growth as an act- 
ress and development along comedy lines 
that is a pleasant surprise. Pitted against 
players like Joseph Cotten and Charles 
Winninger, she gives an account of hersell 
of which she may well be proud. The con- 
vincing quality of her portrayal of a rich 
girl in love with an aviator of no financial 
or social standing bears witness to the 
expansion of her talents. All that has been 
said adds up to one thing: a resurgence ol 
popularity for the girl who once was Uni- 
versal^ brightest asset. 

Although the screenplay of Lewis R. 
Foster, as based on a story by John D. 
Klorer, leaves much to be desired, it serves 
as a good vehicle for Miss Durbin. For 
those who cannot conceive of a Miss Durbin 
without a song on her lips there are a 
number of occasions where the star lifts 
her voice to the music of familiar tunes. 

Cotten shares the romantic assignment 
with Miss Durbin as a former Flying Tiger 
working in an airplane plant until he can 
see action again. A brash and assertive 
fellow, he forces himself upon the girl, 
turning her resentment into love by the 
sheer force of his charm. That she may 
be closer to him Miss Durbin gets a job in 
the plane factory. When the showdown 
comes, he tries to turn her against him, 
feeling that her marriage to a guy like 
him would be ill-advised. But love is not 
to be denied, and at the finale the sweet- 
hearts are in each other's arms. 

Miss Durbin and Cotten have the support 
of a first-rate cast. Winninger is immense 
as Miss Durbin's absent-minded pop. Gus 
Schilling also shows to fine advantage as 
a bosom pal of Cotten's. Standing out 
among the others are Nella Walker, Ludwig 
Stossel, Fay Helm, Evelyn Ankers, Samuel S 
Hinds, Murray Alper, Minna Phillips. 

The film is very much of a triumph for 
Felix Jackson, its producer, and Frank Ryan, 
its director. The one has given "Hers to 
Hold" a smart production with many salable 
angles; the other has imparted lightness and 
fluidity. Bows also to Cameraman Woody 
Bredell, Art Director John B. Goodman and 
Musical Director Charles Previn. Frank 
Shaw functioned as associate producer. 

CAST: Deanna Durbin, Joseph Cotten 
Charles Winninger, Nella Walker, Gus 
Schilling, Ludwig Stossel, Irving Bacon, 
Nydia Westman, Murray Alper, Samuel S 
Hinds, Iris Adrian, Douglas Wood, Minna 
Phillips, Fay Helm, Evelyn Ankers. 

CREDITS: Producer, Felix Jackson; As 
sociate Producer, Frank Shaw; Director 
Frank Ryan; Screenplay, Lewis R. Foster; 
Based on story by John D. Klorer; Camera 
man, Woody Bredell; Art Director, John B. 
Goodman; Film Editor, Ted Kent; Sound \ 
Supervisor, Bernard B. Brown; Musical 
Director, Charles Previn. 

DIRECTION, Good. PHOTOGRAPHY 
Good. 



Friday, July 16, 1943 



: W 



DAILY 



OWI Seeks Distribution Men for Foreign Service 



Kastner to Supervise 
Continental Zone With 
Lawrence in Algiers 



'Mil 

ft 



(Continued from Page 1) 

with the announcement that Colum- 
bia Pictures has released Lacy Kast- 
ner, assistant to Joseph McConville, 
Lpany's foreign distribution chief, 
service to the OWI. Kastner 
act as supervisor of distribution 
of the films on the Continent, head- 
quartering in London. His duties will 
parallel those of Laudy Lawrence 
who will supervise distribution out 
of Algiers. 

Lawrence is already abroad and 
Kastner, who has had previous ex- 
perience in OWI foreign service, and 
therefore requires no orientation, will 
leave shortly. 

(Word that the OWI was desirous 
of obtaining Kastner's services was 
printed in The Film Daily Tues- 
day.) 



End oi European War 
Foreseen by Balaban 



(.Continued from Page 1) 

that Paramount will be the only 
company in the business without debt 
of any kind." 

Attributing the company's status 

j to "teamwork of the entire organi- 
zation," he paid tribute to Neil Ag- 
new's distribution department. 

Adolph Zukor, board chairman; C. 
J. Scollard and B. G. De Sylva, were 

' other speakers, while a telegram, 
glowingly optimistic about 1943-44 
product, from Y. Frank Freeman, 
studio head, was read. 



,, Joe O'Brien Recuperates 

Joe O'Brien, co-editor of Univer- 
sal Newsreel, is back at his resi- 
dence for recuperation from a ma- 
i jor operation performed recently in 
I local Presbyterian Hospital. 



WAR SERVICE 

. . . on the Film Front 



Omaha — The Variety Club's annual the- 
atrical jamboree at Peony Park proved a 
triple success with Jane Wyman selling 
$107,200 worth of bonds, the club's char- 
ities benefitting to the tune of $3,500, 
and members and the more than 2,000 
guests having a swell time. 

...— V..,— 

First five days of the "Shangri-La" drive 
in the Huron Theater, Huron, S. D., totaled 
$365.75, it is reported by Marion Walker. 
House only seats around 600. Audience 
solicitation, playing of "Shangri-La" record- 
ing, and other promotional angles have 
contributed to the total. 



RKO Theaters Across Country Hang Dp Sale 

Of $12,054,766.50 in War Bonds and Stamps 

More than twelve million dollars in War Stamps and Bonds have been sold 
in RKO theaters throughout the country during the past year, according to 
Edward L. Alperson, general manager of the Circuit. 

Exactly $9,928,325.00 in Bonds and $2 126,441.50 in Stamps were bought 
by RKO patrons from coast-to-coast, the combination totaling as of July 1, 
$12,054,766.50. Of this sum, $6,982,599.20— more than half— was sold in 
RKO Metropolitan New York houses. 



$1.10 Minimum FWTBT Scale 

Pre-release Oct. 1 in 45 Important Cities 





(Continued from Page 1) 

evenings, with the minimum scale to 
be incorporated in the playing terms. 
Paramount, the district managers 
and advertising reps, and assembled 
home office execs, were told by Rob- 
ert M. Gillham, will back the special 
roadshow releasing plan "with the 
greatest ad - publicity - exploitation 
effort, in the history of the motion 
picture industry." 
Gillham disclosed 
that the four- 
week New York 
advance campaign 
alone had cost 
about $150,000 
and said that the 
Los Angeles cam- 
paign will be as 
big. Pic starts a 
roadshow run at 
the Carthay Cir- 
cle there Aug. 18, 
with $2.20 top 
prevailing as at 
the Rivoli here. 
A two-house opening for Chicago 
is in prospect to follow, after which 
the pic will open on a continuous 
policy either in New Orleans or 
Memphis and possibly Washington. 

All of these premieres will be held by 
mid-September. Meanwhile, with the ad.- 
publicity campaign continuously building-, 
and reaching- a peak by Oct. 1, the pic will 
be pre-released on that date in approximately 
45 important cities, all continuous engage- 
ments. Soon after, advanced admission en- 
gagements will get under way in 311 selected 
important situations, and eventually will open 
everywhere. 



CHARLES M. REACAN 



ROBERT M. GILLHAM 



Gillham. saying that the FWTBT campaign 
has to date laid the greatest publicity founda- 
tion of any pic in Paramount's history, added 
that the publicity bar- 
rage will be continu- 
ous. A total of $189,- 
000 is being spent in 
national and fan mag- 
azines, starting Sept. 
J . The schedule has 
been set through No- 
vember. Total circu- 
lation of these inser- 
tions will be 29,600,- 
000. Including the 
advance announce- 
ments schedule will 
keep the pic. before 
the magazine public 
for seven months. 

Gillham said that 
the largest adv. cam- 
paign in the indus- 
try's history is plan- 
ned for trade publications. 

Agnew declared exhibitors around the coun-' 
try have already shown unprecedented in- 
terest in the picture and he has received 
numerous telephone calls from exhibitors 
who want to book the picture immediately. 
Some said. "You can write your own ticket." 
Alec Moss, exploitation manager, called 
in his district ad. staff for the first time in 
a year to discuss the field campaigns on "For 
Whom the Bell Tolls." Special handling is 
planned for each situation. 

$27,000 FWTBT^Advance, 
With Sellouts Reported 

With a sellout at $2.20 top for 
both performances yesterday, FWT- 
BT at the Rivoli has a sellout to- 
night and tomorrow night, it was 
said by Robert M. Weitman. 

The advance sale for the two-a- 
day reserved seat engagement was 



Reagan said theaters will be permitted to reported by Weitman as $27,000, in- 
charge more than the minimum where the ! eluding Wednesday's premiere 

house can be scaled accordingly, such as fori m> if,. , „„nf "> , '-i 

be reserved, at I pickets are selling tour weeks m 



seats, and seats may 



the option of the exhib. 



advance. 



L. A. Proposes Tax on All 
Amusements Admissions 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — The revenue and taxa- 
tion and finance committees of the 
Los Angeles city council have recom- 
mended that theaters, cafes with 
cover charge, and all places of 
amusement should be taxed, putting 
a levy of one cent on all admissions. 
It is estimated that the proposed 
tax would result in theaters paying 
$1,000,000 to $1,500,000, Annually. 
Proceeds are desired for renovation 
of the Los Angeles sewer system. 



Top Brooklyn Strand 
Billing for Rogers Pic 

Republic's bid-budget Roy Rogers 
special, "Silver Spurs," gets top 
billing at the Brooklyn Strand, where 
it is opening Thursday, together with 
the studio's "Headin' For God's 
Country." Prior to its booking of the 
previous Rogers film, "Song of Tex- 
as," the Strand had never played a 
western attraction. 



What's in a Title? 

"Best Foot Forward" has stepped 
out as the top grosser of any Metro 
pic ever to play the Astor. 



Frisco Theaters Ask 
48-Hour Exemption 

(Continued from Page 1) 

application for exemption from the 
48-hou: week in theaters affected by 
the critical labor area ruling had 
been filed with the WMC regional 
office. 

The request for exemption was 
made by all theaters in the area, 
which includes all San Francisco, 
Oakland, Richmond, Berkeley and 
other East Bay and peninsula cities, 
on the basis of a survey of personnel 
and other conditions conducted by 
a committee headed by Thall and 
others. 

Thall said that inauguration of a 
48-hour week would result in no 
saving of labor and that many would 
have to work seven days a week if 
the regulation were imposed. He 
said a ruling on the application could 
not, be expected for some consider- 
able time. 



FWTBT Features, Reviews 
Make All Wire Services 



"For Whom the Bell Tolls" world 
premiere at the Rivoli got an unpre- 
cedented number of syndicate and 
spot wire breaks a total of 20 — from 
New York, reviews and feature 
stories hitting the AP, UP, INS and 
NANA wires during the last five 
weeks. AP gave the premiere a 
double break, a review going out on 
its "A" wire last night while an in- 
terview with Y. Frank Freeman was 
also spotted. UP also carried inter- 
views with Freeman and Akim Ta- 
miroff and its wire review covered 
the pic's highlights. INS went for a 
review and a Buddy De Sylva inter- 
view, while NANA sent out a De Syl- 
va interview as a wire feature. Pic 
also cashed in with roto pages. Na- 
tional syndicate-wire service cam- 
paign was handled by Tom Waller's 
Para.'s regular home office contact. 



Broadway Theater Sold 

Trebuhs Realty Co., Inc., of which 
Lee Schubert is vice-president, has 
purchased the Broadway Theater 
from the City Bank Farmers Trust 
Co., as trustee of the Prudence Bonds 
Corp., for a reported $450,000. Buyer 
gave back a purchase money mort- 
gage for $250,000, due in seven years 
at 4% per cent. 



The 

FE 



TOUCH 



MARION F. C. NICKELL, head of copy writing 
dept., Filmack Trailer Co., Chicago. 

RUTH COHEN, secretary to Fred Joyce, UA pub- 
licity director, Chicago. 



(?jz6£$& ?7io&6&0?nvi 




~~ 



ICTORY 

CARBONS 



4" 



^* E V o ,C T I° c ^CARBO NS 



RECOMMENDED TRIM AND RAN6E OF ARC CURRENT FOR LAMPS 
USING COPPER COATED, HIGH INTENSITY, PROJECTOR CARBONS 



Arc Current — Amperes 



New Victory Carious — Size and Type 



52-66 
40-42 



42-45 
42-45 



56-65 



7 mm x 9 inch H.I., A.C. Carbons in both holders 
7 mm x 12 inch or 14 inch "Suprex" Positive 

6 mm x 9 inch "Orotip" C Negative 

7 mm x 12 inch or 14 inch "Suprex" Positive 

6 mm x 9 inch "Orotip" C Negative 

7 mm x 12 inch or 14 inch "Suprex" Positive 

7 mm x 9 inch "Orotip" C Negative 

8 mm x 12 inch or 14 inch "Suprex" Positive 
7 mm x 9 inch "Orotip" C Negative 




You can obtain maximum efficiency and economy from 
your Victory Carbons by observing the following simple 
rules. 

USE CARBON TRIM RECOMMENDED FOR YOUR PROJECTION EQUIPMENT. 
The Victory Carbon trims indicated in the above table 
were established by comprehensive laboratory and field 
tests to ascertain the best results obtainable in all types 
of equipment. 

OPERATE CARBONS AT SPECIFIED ARC CURRENT. 
Better projection and greater economy are obtained 
when recommended arc currents are maintained. The 
maximum allowable arc current is stamped on each 
Victory Carbon at the left of the trade-mark. 

CHECK FEED RATIO CAREFULLY. 

Changes of arc current alter the ratio of burning rate be- 



tween positive and negative carbons. On lamps equipped 
with adjustable feed and formerly operated above 45 
amperes arc current, this ratio should be adjusted to 
meet the new current conditions. 

A bulletin describing operation of the new Victory High 
Intensity Carbons is available for distribution and will 
be sent promptly upon request. 



SAVE 



T H E 



COPPER 



Most of the copper used for plating copper coated 
projector carbons drops to the floor of the lamp house 
when the carbons are burned. Continue to save these 
copper drippings and turn them over to your supply 
dealer as designated by our government. 



QgyiCTORY 
BUY 




NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC 

Unit of Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation 

LTH3 



Carbon Sales Division, Cleveland, Ohio 

GENERAL .OFFICES 
30 East 42nd Street, New York, N. Y. 

BRANCH SALES OFFICES 
New York, Pittsburgh, Chicago, St. Louis, San Francisco 




Building 
Remodeling 



imB^Mi^y^m\ 




Equipment 
Maintenance 



DAILY 



+ * * • 



NEW YORK, FRIDAY, JULY 16. 1943 



* * * * 



NO FUEL OIL ALLEVIATION IS EXPECTED 

Gov't Need For 16 mm. Equipment Urgent 



EQUIPMENT 
FIELD NOTES 



Joe Goldberg, Chi. theater supply dis- 
tributor, says that business is holding in 
good volume, and that his firm has turned 
over more than 100 pounds of copper drip- 
pings the past few months, any revenue 
therefrom goes to the Red Cross. 

William H. Powell, formerly with 
Bausch & Lomb, has been appointed 
secretary-treasurer of Schick, Inc. 
George Baetzel of B & L has ben 
awarded $1,000 by the company for 
an idea that reduced by 30 per cent 
the rejections of lenses for aerial cam- 
eras. 

Owen Howell, of the W. R. Howell Co., 
Oklahoma City, was a Chi. visitor the other 
day at the Motiograph plant. He was on 
a special mission to buy equipment for the 
armed services. 

Martin Printz, of Cleveland's Al- 
hambra Theater, is in California. Be- 
fore leaving, he contracted with NTS 
to repaint the theater throughout, and 
to provide new stage drapes. 
* * * 

F. J. Wenzel, of Wenzel Projector Co., 
is recuperating from a sinus operation. He 
is back at his desk, however, and declares 
the plant is still at full capacity on Gov- 
ernment contracts. 

Prank Van Husen, owner of West- 
ern Theater Supply, has left the hos- 
pital in Chicago after a 30-day stay, 
and is back in Omaha but still taking 
things easy. He is recovering from a 
fall. 

Fensin seating Co. is now making con- 
tracts with circuits and independents to 
service their seating requirements for the 
duration, including repairs and damage suf- 
fered from vandalism. 

Big stands up New Haven way are 
still having difficulty obtaining air- 
conditioner refrigerant material. What's 
more, some houses in the territory have 
no engineers to run the plants. 

Frederic Lackens, of the Hays Corp., 
Michigan City, has just been elected presi- 
dent of the National Industrial Advertisers 

(.Continued on Page 10) 






Projector Demand Biggest; 
Sharp Reduction Foreseen 
In Current 35 mm. Orders 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Manufacturers of 16 
mm. photographic equipment will 
meet today with officials of the WPB 
Motion Picture Section here to re- 
view the entire production situation. 
It appears that the problem is not 
so much one of cutting down pro- 
duction as it is of stepping up sched- 
ules in order to meet the demands 
of the Army and the Navy, espe- 
cially for 16 mm. projectors. 

A thousand of these projectors are 
on order for the military, with the 
Navy now beginning to shift from 
35 to 16 mm. booths even on board 

(Continued on Page 11) 



Name Liberty Ship 
For B & L Founder 



Rochester — A Liberty ship is to 
be named the S.S. Henry Lomb in 
honor of the Civil War hero and co- 
founder of the Bausch & Lomb Op- 
tical Co., the U. S. Maritime Com- 
mission has announced. 

Date of the launching has not 
been announced, but it is expected 
to be in August or September from 
the Fairfield yard of the Bethlehem 
Shipbuilding Co. at Baltimore, Md. 

Seven workers of Bausch & Lomb 
will attend the launching, the com- 
pany said. A contest called the "Vic- 
tory Roll Call" began this week for 

(Continued on Page 11) 



ARMY-NAVY "E" 
FOR LIBRASCOPE 

75 Second GPEC Subsidiary 
To Win Coveted Honor 



Earle G. Hines, president of Gen- 
eral Precision Equipment Corp. (for- 
merly General Theaters Equipment 
Corp.), a n- 
nounces that an- 
other one of its 
man uf acturing 
s u b s id i a ries, 
Librascope, Inc., 
of B u r b a n k, 
Calif., has re- 
eeived the 
Army-Navy "E" 
Award for ex- 
cellence in pro- 
duction of war 
material for the 
Navy. 

Libras cope, 
Inc., is managed 
by Herbert Griffin as president, who 




HERBERT GRIFFIN 



(Continued on Page 11) 



Calvin Co. Acquires 
Thea. and Building 



Kansas City, Mo. — The New Cen- 
ter Theater, at 15th and Troost, dark 
for several years, together with the 
vacant fireproof building which 
houses it, have been bought by the 

(Continued on Page 10) 



Detroit Theaters Improve 

Mork Studios Report 8 Jobs In Territory 



Eastman-made Telescopes 
Sight Navy's Fast Gun 

Rochester — A five-inch, rapid-fire 
gun that turns on plane, surface 
craft or submarine with 50-lb. shells 
depends for its aim on two Eastman 
Kodak Co.-made telescopes. 

The Navy telescope, Mark 61, and 
its companion piece, Mark 62, made 

(Continued on Page 10) 



Theaters' Supply Will 
Still Depend Entirely 
Upon Future War Needs 



Wa'hington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Fuel oil outlook for 
film theaters next Winter appears 
to promise about the same situation 
as last winter. The routine of get- 
ting ration books and certificates 
will be simpler, but the supply situ- 
ation, according to present esti- 
mates, seems to be about the same 
as last year for the rationed states. 

Only important change is the re- 
laxation in requirements for con- 
version of oil burners to coal. Be- 
cause of the difficulty in getting 
parts required for conversion, and 
because of the uncertainty regard- 
ing the coal supply and transporta- 
tion of coal to several areas, the- 
aters which burn less than 10,000 
gallons of oil per year are, in sev- 

(Continued on Page 11) 

id-West RCA Service 
Made More Compact 

Chicago — RCA Service in 15 States, 
with Chicago as headquarters, has 
been combined under the direction 
of H. V. Somerville. J. P. Ware 
continues as Chicago district man- 
ager, with Paul Connet in charge 
of the Kansas City offices, and L. R. 
Yohis in charge of the Cleveland 
branch. 

T. M. Fisher heads the Chicago 
Photophone sales, while Paul Pfohl 

(Continued on Page 10) 



Detroit — Robert J. Mork, head of 
Mork-Green Studios, declares that 
exhibitors in this territory are con- 
tinuing steady improvement and re- 
placement of essential theater equip- 
ment, as available, despite wartime 
conditions. The company currently 
has eight jobs in progress in Michi- 
gan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. 

Local jobs are: new stage draper- 

(Continued on Page 11) 



New "Silver Screen" 
To Debut After War 

Chicago — The Radiant Mfg. Co. 
here is working on a third-dimen- 
sion screen, it is disclosed by A. 
Wertheimer of that organization. It 
will be marketed under the trade 
name "Silver Screen," but not until 
war's end. Though company is now 
making screens for the Army and 
Navy, its regular theater trade is 
receiving servicing consistent with 
prevailing conditions. 



10 



EQUIPMENT NEWS 



cW< 



DAILY 



Friday, July 16, 1943 




A Section of THE FILM DAILY compre- 
hensively covering the equipment field, pub- 
lished every second week by Wid's Films and 
Film Folks, Inc., 1501 Broadway, New York 
City. John W. Alicoate, Publisher; Donalo 
M. Mersereau, General Manager; Chester B. 
Bahn, Editor; George H. Morris, Equipment 
Editor; West Coast Bureau, 6425 Hollywood 
Boulevard, Hollywood, Cal., Ralph Wilk, 
Bureau Chief. 



EQUIPMENT 
FIELD NOTES 

' (Continued from Page 9) ^i 



Ass'n., and Walter A. Bowe, of the Car- 
rier Corp., Syracuse, the vice-president. 

* « * 

The 300-seat Varsity, Champaign, 
III., twin city of Urbana, was recently 
reopened by Theodore K. Anthony. 
While shuttered, it was thoroughly 
modernized. 

* * * 

Will DeVry and his family are spending 
their vacation days in northern Michigan, 
where Bill, to recoup a bit from his in- 
cessant biz grind in the interest of the 
war effort, will do a spot of fishing and 
golfing. 

* * * 

Our Editorial sanctum had a dis- 
tinguished equipment father and son 
drop in this week for a visit, accom- 
panied by P. A. McGuire, ad man- 
ager for IPC. Duo comprised John 
Griffiths, pioneer on motion picture 
optics and originator of the "lens 
chart" which bears his name, and tat- 
ter's offspring. Both ar'e with the Cap- 
ital in Ansonia, Conn., owned by War- 
ners who took this stand (and others) 
over from I. J. Hoffman. The Senior 
Griffiths has been in the same job 
there for 31 years, and Junior Griffiths 
f or 25, — a total, between them of 46 
years. Who can boast of record's 
equal? Senior is, by the by, past pres- 
ident of Local 273, New Haven. 




For Excellence in the Production 
f Motion Picture Sound Equipment 



IT'S A FACT! 

War-born DEVRY preci- 
sion Theatre- Projectors 
and Sound Systems pre- 
sent developments far 
beyond previously ac- 
cepted standards. DEVRY 
Corporation, 1112 Armi- 
tage Avenue, Chicago, 111. 




DeVRY 



Hollywood • CHICAGO • New York 



WHITEWAY 

ELECTRIC SIGN & MAINTENANCE CO. 

Thomas F. Flannery, President 

315-17 W. Walton St. Chicago, III. 

Delaware 911 i 



Calvin Co. Acquires 
Thea. and Building 



(Continued from Page 9) 

Calvin Company, a local manufac- 
turer of educational films for mili- 
tary purposes and for the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Office of 
Education. Expansion of business 
necessitated larger quarters and the 
purchase will enable the buyers to 
group their operations under one 
roof. 

Remodeling and rehabilitation are 
expected to run from $25,000 to $30,- 
000. The lower part of the theater 
floor will be raised to make a level 
projection studio with a 36-foot 
ceiling. The space released by the 
floor leveling will provide for a gar- 
age at the rear of the building. A 
little theater for private showings 
also will be on the big theater floor. 
The second floor will house the pro- 
duction department which includes 
writers and directors. Processing 
of films will be on third floor while 
the duplicating and printing will be 
on the fourth. - 

General offices and lounge will oc- 
cupy number five. The animation 
department will share the sixth with 
the Movie-Mite Corporation. The 
latter will overflow this space to 
occupy all the seventh floor, where 
this related unit of the company will 



No Gate Crasher, Sic 
Wind Removes Fence 

Houston — Damage of $300 was 
suffered by the Drive-ln Theater in 
this city's suburban area on July 8 
as result of a freak storm. Wind, 
of gale force, sprang up just before 
the evening show and ripped up some 
500 feet of fencing which sur- 
rounded the parking spact. Addi- 
tional damage was also done. 



Eastman-made Telescopes 
Sight Navy's Fast Gun 

(Continued from Page 9) 

at Kodak are used for sighting the 
dual purpose gun which has become 
the favorite armament for all sur- 
face ships. The telescopes are equip- 
ped with color filters for use in fog, 
twilight or glare, and with an il- 
luminator that causes the cross 
hairs, used in sighting, to light up 
at night. 



Modernize Geneva Theater 

Geneva, 111. — The Geneva Theater 
has been modernized, from canopy 
to stage. Indirect lighting, modern- 
istic carpets and distinctive poster 
boards were installed. 



continue to manufacture 16 mm. 
projectors for wartime use and for 
showing their films which they have 
been making for 12 years. 



usAIRco 

AIR CONDITIONING 

IS ENGINEERED 
To Meet the Job Requirements and 
Your Operating Budget .5 




iJb&jt. 



THEATRE OPERATORS don't buy air conditioning M 
just for the privilege of hanging a sign from the 
marquee announcing "Air Conditioning Inside". 

Theatre Air Conditioning is bought for just one 
purpose — to increase the number of buyers at the Box 
Office — to attract and induce people into their house 
as against the beach, the boat or a buggy ride. 



• When you buy Comfort Cooling from 
usAIRco you're doing business with an 
engineering staff that knows how to de- 
sign a system that fits the requirements of 
your house — is engineered for original low 
cost, and low daily operating costs. 

Many a time we've come out of a The- 
atre and asked — "What's the matter, is 
your cooling system broken?" — And the 
answer surprised us — "No, it's O. K. But 
it costs too much to run it for the few 
that are in there tonight. " 

The man who owns a cooling system 
that's so costly to operate, that he can run 
it only occasionally would be better off 




without such a system. So while he may 
have a perfectly engineered system, he has 
one that costs too much to use. 

usAIRco engineers the type of cooling 
system you can afford to buy and afford to 
operate every day — regardless of the size 
of your house — or your needs for plain 
air, evaporated cooling, cold water or re- 
frigerated air conditioning. usAIRco en- 
gineers can fill your needs precisely. 

The iobs you have planned for V-day 
should receive the attention of usAIRco 
right now. Write us about your plans. 



UNITED STATES AIR CONDITIONING CORPORATION 



Profits in Cooling for the Exhibitor 
Northwestern Terminal • Minneapolis, Minn. 



REFRIGERATED KOOLER-AIRE 

This Unit combines every phase of refrigerated 
cooling in a Single Unit. Manufactured in vari- 
ous sizes, it can be used singly or in combination 
with other units to give you the precise capacity 
you need. Books describing this system are 
available. We'll be glad to send you a copy. 




id-West RCA Service 
Made More Compact 



(Continued from Page 9) 

is in charge of the tube division. 

Sidney Robards has been placed in 
charge of the commercial research 
department, with J. L. Spanenberg, 
formerly of the Jewel Company, 
Barrington, 111., named assistant. 

( 

B & H Promotes Schreyer 

Chicago — Carl Schreyer, formerly 
war purchasing expeditor for the 
Bell & Howell Co., has been named 
general purchasing agent. 




Exhibitors of America have many du- 
ties to perform these war days. You 
build unity and morale through motion 
picture presentations— and you promote 
and support the various government 
drives that are initiated to spur war 
production and civilian defense. 

RCA Service, like exhibitors, is carry- 
ing on important war duties: RCA en- 
gineers are rendering scheduled service 
to projection room equipment in thou- 
sands of theatres to "Keep 'em Run- 
ning"— and other RCA Service groups 
are installing military equipment and 
instructing personnel, in this country 
and at the battlefronts. 

The RCA Service organization is to- 
day more than nation-wide 
... it is world-wide . . . serv- 
ing the home front and 
battlefronts too! 





RCA SERVICE CO., INC. 

RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA 
Subsidiary 

Camden, N. J. 



Friday, July 16, 1943 



w 



DAILY 



EQUIPMENT NEWS 



11 



Government Seeking 
More 16 mm. Equip. 

(Continued from Page 9) 

ship and for overseas entertainment 
screening. The only large military 
user of 35 mm. equipment, now that 
the Navy is converting to the smal- 
ler size, will be the Army motion 
fire service. It is unlikely that 
of the large machines used by 
other branches of either service will 
be taken out of use, but orders for 
new 35 mm. equipment will fall off 
sharply. Government officials make 
it plain that even with manufactu- 
rers of 16 mm. projectors working at 
capacity there will be no possibility 
of any equipment going to operators 
of 16 mm. theaters for public patron- 
age. 

The expansion of the 16 mm. "cir- 
cuits" seems to be a matter for post- 
war consideration — when it is likely 
that a large quantity of machines 
will be put on the market for the 
military. Some 35 mm. machines are 
also expected to go on the market, 
but it is believed that quantities of 
either type released will be insuffi- 
cient to flood the market. 



Librascope, Inc., Awarded 
The Army-Navy "E" Flag 

(Continued from Page 9) 

is also vice-president of the Interna- 
tional Projector Corp. and well 
known in the motion picture field. 
Company produces a computer of 
unique design for use by the Ord- 
nance and Aeronautical Departments 
of the Armed Forces. This is the 
second subsidiary of General Pre- 
cision Equipment Corp. to be awarded 
the Army-Navy "E" flag, the first 
being the CineSimplex Corp. of Syra- 
cuse, which in peacetime was en- 
gaged in the production of cameras 
for use in motion picture studios and 
for newsreel work. 

The six manufacturing plants of 
General Precision Equipment Corp. 
are presently operating at capacity 
both in the manufacture of their reg- 
ular motion picture equipment, most 
of which is for the various depart- 
ments of the Government, and also 
in the manufacture of instruments 
of critical and urgently needed types. 



WE CAN 



STILL SUPPLY 

alt standard 35mm. pre- 
cision projector replace- 
ment parts. 

We do not sell to 
theatres, direct. 

FREE — Our latest 
complete projector parts 

catalog. 

CtVE your dealer's name, 

when writing to get your 

copy of our catalog. 

WENZEL PROJECTOR CO. 




2505-19 South Stat* St. 



Chlugo. III. 



Eastman's Manpower "Equipment" Comes From 
Many Walks of the World of Entertainment! 

Rochester — Musicians and actors are among the thousands of workers now 
aiding the war effort at Eastman Kodak Co. Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra 
members at the plant include Robert Sprenkle, William Versteeg, Nelson Wat- 
son, Nathaniel Paley, Herman Surasky and John Figueras. Others include: 
Howard Lawson, formerfy with the Trenton Symphony; Alfred Genazzio, with 
the Dallas orchestra; Albert Clapp, night club pianist; Frank Rivers, orchestra 
leader; Bob Brethen, ventriloquist, formerly in vaudeville; Bill Long and Larry 
Dowdell, vaudeville dancers; John M. O'Brien, former stage hand; Ronald 
Langley, formerly on the stage and radio; Thomas Keane, who once worked 
with both Blackstone and Thurston. 



Improvements Go On 
In Delroil Sector 



(Continued from Page 9) 

ies and stage equipment for the Col- 
ony Theater for Joseph Ellul; reno- 
vation of draperies and equipment in 
the De Luxe Theater for Asrian D. 
Rosen, and also in the Downtown 
Theater for Howard Hughes, who is 
readying the house for opening as 
a first-run. 

Schine Circuit has two jobs in 
progress: stage equipment for the 
Holland Theater, Belief ontaine, 0.; 
and stage draperies and wall pan- 
elling for the State Theater, Fos- 
toria, 0. 

Other jobs include: draperies and 
stage equipment for Manos Theater, 
Ellwood City, Pa.; front traveler and 
track for Capitol Theater, Flint, 
Mich., for W. S. Butterfield Circuit; 
and stage draperies and complete 
wall panelling for the Alhambra 
Theater, Cleveland. 



Popcorn, Added Attraction 

New Haven— The M & P Para- 
mount, downtown first-run, has 
added a popcorn machine to its lobby 
refreshment bar. 



SEEKING A DEPENDABLE 
SOURCE OF SUPPLY FOR YOUR 

THEATRE 
TICKETS? 



INTERNATIONAL OFFERS: 
Dependable service . . . Low cost . . . 
45 year's experience serving theatres, 
stadiums, amusement parks, etc. 
We can supply your needs. Roll, 
machine folded, reserve seats, etc. 
Write lor samples, prices or other information. 

Delivery Iree Maine to Virginia. 

INTERNATIONAL 

T I C K E T (M\ COMPANY 

52 GRAFTON AVE. Vjg/ NEWARK, N. J. 
Sales Of/ices in Principal Centers 



LARGEST SELECTION OF 

Popcorn Machines 

We Buy — Sell — and Service 

All Makes — All Models 

Write us 

KRISPY KORN EQUIPMENT 

120 S. Halsted St. CHICAGO, ILL. 



Name Liberty Ship 
For B & L Founder 



(Continued from Page 9) 

perfect attendance at work. A week 
before the date of the launching the 
names of the perfect record holders 
will be placed in a giant hat, and 
the first seven names drawn will be 
those to go. 

Anton Otto Fischer, widely known 
artist, now in the Navy, has been 
commissioned to make an oil paint- 
ing of the new ship. 



No Improvement Seen 
In Fuel Oil Supply 

(Continued from Page 9) 

eral States, no longer required to 
convert to coal. No conversion, re- 
gardless of how much fuel issued, is 
required of theaters in Florida and 
Georgia, while conversion is not re- 
quired of those houses which re- 
ceived less than 10,000 gallons of 
oil in the current heating year, end- 
ing Sept. 30, in the following States: 
North Dakota, South Dakota, Kan- 
sas, Nebraska, Missouri and the six 
New England States. 

Officials here are unwilling to go 
out on limbs, as they did so fre- 
quently last year, to predict what the 
supply situation will be this winter. 
Military operations, for one thing, 
are quite unpredictable, and there is 
grave question as to how much oil 
the services will need. They insist 
however, that failure to convert to 
coal will mean no heating oil ^for 
theaters in rationed States not men- 
tioned above. 



Houston's Azteca Burns 

Houston — The Azteca Theater, 
seating 350, was destroyed in a fire 
of unknown origin which razed the 
three-story brick and plastered-wall 
building. 



Glenn Improves Ashley 

Ashley, 111. — Albert Watson of 
Mount Vernon has sold the Ashley 
Theater to Frank J. Glenn. The new 
owner is remodeling and improving 
the house. Renovation includes an 
inclined floor, an air-conditioning 
system and a new modern front. 




use the National 




to post-war 
equipment 



National Theatre Supply's "Magic Bridge" will help 
you plan now for your post-war equipment . . . with- 
out "options" or down payments of any kind. 

National's "Magic Bridge" will close the gap between 
your post-war plans and their speedy realization. If 
you have not yet received your personal copy of the 
"Magic Bridge" Equipment Survey, ask for a copy 
at your nearest National branch. 

NATIONAL THEATRE SUPPLY 

Division of N ATIONAl-^*«jg^ t '-BLU D WORTH, INC. 
A Gtn#ro( Precision Equipment Corp. Subsidiary 






M P P ID A INC 
2 11 W 4-4- S T 

-N YC 



EASTMAN 
FILMS 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

J. E. BRULATOUR, INC., DISTRIBUTORS 
Fort Lee Chicago Hollywood 



•' 



More than ever the maiit-v 
stay of the motion picture 
industry, with every foot 
contributing its full share 
of exceptional quality. 






i >■ 



Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 




B<? 



i^ 



T rtciv> v 



The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



wt 



84. NO. 12 



NEW YORK. MONDAY. JULY 19. 1943 



TEN CENTS 



GOV'T APPEALS FROM CRESCENT DECISION 



// 



Super-Escapist" Pictures Is Paramount' s Plan 



At Least a Third of Pix 
For New Season Slated 
To be Shot in Technicolor 



Paramount will mark the 1943-44 
season by the release of "super-es- 
capist" films, Neil Agnew, general 
sales manager, told the company's 
sales execs, at the concluding ses- 
sion of the Hotel Pierre sales meet- 
ing here Friday. At least a third of 
the new lineup will be in Technicolor. 

Asserting that "the need for es- 
capist films to maintain morale and 
entertain our fighting forces has 

(Continued on Page 11) 



First-Runs Weekly 
For Overseas Troops 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Four first-run pro- 
grams weekly is the new rate for 
overseas showing of the 16 mm. 
prints given the Army by the in- 
dustry for America's fighting men. 
Distribution rate thus far has been 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Six Two-Reel Westerns 
On New Warner Program 



San Francisco — Warners shorts 
lineup for 1943-44 of 18 two-reelers 
and 68 one-reelers will include a 
series of six two-reel Westerns, it 
was announced here Saturday by 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Pa. Solons to Get 

Curfew Legislation 

Harrisburg, Pa. — Proposals for a 
state-wide curfew for minors and 
juvenile courts in every county will 
be offered to the 1945 Legislature 
to curb the rapid increase of juvenile 
delinquency. 

At a meeting held here by the 
Legislature's Joint State Government 
Comm'ssion, a study of parole and 
juvenile delinquency was started. It 
is expected that the committee will 
make reports on the recommenda- 
tions to be presented at the next 
session. 



Para. Guaranteeing Minimum 12*/%% Profit 

To Exhibitors Playing "Tolls" at 70-30% 

Paramount 70-30 per cent contracts for "For Whom the Bell Tolls" carry 
a rider guaranteeing the exhibitor a minimum 12Vi per cent profit, it was re- 
ported over the week-end in the wake of the company's New York sales meeting 
which closed Friday. 

FWTBT thus becomes the second pic in recent years to be offered at 
70-30, with a guarantee to the theater. In the instance of GWTW, Metro gave 
the house a guarantee of 10 per cent of its gross receipts as a profit. 



Loew-Lyons to Make 
Three UA Features 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Arthur S. Lyons, vice- 
president of Producing Artists, Inc., 
organized last January to release 
through United Artists, will arrive 
in New York today to purchase story 
properties, to negotiate with writers 
for original musical and dramatic 
material and to lay the groundwork 
for anticipated production of plays 
on Broadway. 

Producing Artists, of which David 

(Continued on Page 3) 



War Shorts Program 
Wails on Conference 



Vacation 'A' Gas Order 
Stirs New Eng. Protests 

Boston — A storm of protest 
against the vacation gas order has 
arisen in the New England area. 
At first glance the exhibitors and 
operators were pleased over what 
they believed was some relief from 

(Continued on Page 6) 



WAC's Co-ordinating Committee, 
Executive Committee of the Theaters 
Division, and chairmen of the ex- 
hibitor exchange area committees, 
representing more than 8,000 houses, 
heard addresses Friday by Charles 
P. Taft, head of the Division of Rec- 
reation and Welfare of the Federal 
Security Agency, and Theodore R. 
Gamble, assistant to Secretary Mor- 
genthau and Director of War Financ- 
ing for the U. S. Treasury. 

Taft's address, delivered at the 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Authorizations for Film 
180 Days Old Cancelled 

Workington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Authorizations more 
than 180 days old for 35 mm. film 
were cancelled at the week-end by 
WPB, through an amendment to 

(Continued on Page 6) 



it. Research Guiding WB 



Prime Factor in Strong Financial Position 



Watertown, Mass., Houses 
In Clearance Complaints 



Two clearance complaints have 
been filed with the Boston arbitra- 
tion tribunal. In one Consolidated 
Theater, Inc., operator of the 
Plymouth, Worcester, Mass., filed 
against all five claiming that the 
30 days' clearance granted Loew's 
Plaza or the Elm Street Theater, 

(Continued on Page 11) 



An important contributing factor 
in the strong financial position being 
achieved by Warners as summarized 
by the Dow-Jones financial service 
at the week-end, was revealed in the 
discussions of sales policies at the 
series of regional meetings which 
closed Saturday in San Francisco. 

In formulating and carrying out 
these policies, which have placed 
Warners in the unique position of 
increasing gross income to an all- 

(Continued on Page 10) 



Would Amend Paragraph 
On Defendant's Acquisi- 
tion of More Theaters 



By P. R. RUSSELL 

FILM DAILY Staff Correspondent 

Nashville — Assistant Attor- 
ney General Tom C. Clark, for 
the plaintiff, the United States 
Government, Friday appealed to the 
Supreme Court that the Crescent 
anti-trust case be remanded for a 
correction of the decree with refer- 
ence to asquisition of new theaters 
by the exhibitor defendants. Cres- 
cent and affiliated exhibitors are 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Reduced Scope for 
U.S.N. Incentive Pix 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — The industrial incen- 
tive film program planned by the 
Navy is so far, at any rate, consid- 
erably smaller in scope than the 

(Continued on Page 10) 



Await Hoyt Ruling 

On Length of "Aleutians" 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — A decision was ex- 
pected this week-end on a matter of 
great importance to the motion pic- 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Femme Cops Arrest 
200 Theater Mashers 

Newark, N. J. — This city is defi- 
nitely no haven for the theater 
masher. At least 200 have been 
apprehended by a special police- 
women's squad recently appointed 
by Police Commissioner John Keenan, 
to make theatergoing safe for un- 
escorted theatergoing women. 

So well pleased is the police head 
with the results accomplished by 
his co-operettes that he plans to add 
at least six more to the squad to 
break up vandalism which in past 
months has cost local operators thou- 
sands of dollars in damages. 



a^a»«a»™ 



m d$t 



DAILY 



Monday, July 19, 1943 




Vol. 84, No. 12 Mon., July 19, 1943 10 Cents 
JOHN W. ALICOATE Publisher 

DONALD M. MERSEREAU : General Manager 
CHESTER B. BAHN :::::: Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y. ( by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
Eecond class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10. 0U one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address: 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco-Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



FINANCIAL 



(July 16) 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 



Col. Picts. vtc. (2!/ 2 %) 

Con. Fm. Ind 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd. . . 

East. Kodak 

do pfd 

Gen. Prec. Eq 

Loew's, Inc 

Paramount 

RKO 

RKO $6 pfd 

20th Century-Fox. . . . 
20th Century-Fox pfd. 

Warner Bros 

do pfd 

89 13-32 
NEW YORK 

Par. B'way 3s55 

Par. Picts. deb. 4s56. 



High Low 
19 19 

3 2% 

17 16% 
66 166 1 
178'/ 2 1 



Close 
19 



+ 



+ 



225/g 221/4 

63i/ 2 63 

293/ 8 285/g 

10 95/s 

98 97 

243/4 23% 

34 34 

15% 151/4 



3 
17 
66 
79 

22V 4 _ 
63 + 
28% — 

93/4 + 
971/2 + 
24 
34 
151/4 — 



Net 
Chg. 
V* 

Vb 

'A 
1 

" Vz 
Vz 
1/4 
% 
Vs 

1 



89 13-32 89 13-32 
BOND MARKET 



Robert, Raymond Hakim, 
Sam Coslow Leaving MGM 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Robert and Raymond 
Hakim and Sam Coslow, M-G-M pro- 
ducers are leaving the organization. 



MITCHELL MAY, Jr. 

C0. f INC. 
INSURANCE 

Specializing 

in requirements of the 

Motion Picture Industry 

75 Maiden Lane, New York 
510 W. 6th St. Lot Angeles 



H The Broadway Parade H 

Picture and Distributor Theater 

Mission to Moscow (Warner Bros. Pictures) — 12th week Hollywood 

Coney Island (20th Century-Fox) — 5th week Roxy 

Stage Door Canteen (United Artists-Sol Lesser) — 4th week Capitol 

The Youngest Profession (Metro-Coldwyn-Mayer Pictures) — 4th week Music Hall 

Dixie (Paramount Pictures)— 4th week Paramount 

Best Foot Forward (Metro-Coldwyn-Mayer Pictures) — 4th week Astor 

Background to Danger (Warner Bros. Pictures) — 3rd week Strand 

Bombardier (RKO Radio Pictures) — 3rd week Criterion 

For Whom the Bell Tolls (Paramount Pictures) — 2nd week Rivoli 

Victory Through Air Power (United Artists-Walt Disney) Clobe 

Appointment in Berlin (Columbia Pictures) iRialto 

My Friend Flicka (Twentieth Century-Fox) (a-b) Palace 

All By Myself ( Republic Pictures) (a) Palace 

Wise Guy (Monogram I ictures) — Opens tomorrow (a) New York 

Stranger from Pecos (Monogram Pictures)— Opens tomorrow (a) New York 

♦ FOREiGN LANGUAGE FEATURES ♦ 

The Russian Story (Artkino Pictures) — 7th week Stanley 

Creo en Dios (Crovos-Mohme) Belmont 

A Fire in the Straw (Herbert Rosener) — 3rd week (a) World 

Pledge to Bataan (Adventure Pictures) — 3rd week (a) World 

♦ FUTURE OPENi JVGS ♦ 

Stormy Weather (Twentieth Century-Fox) — July 21 Roxy 

Hers to Hold (Universal Pictures) — July 21 Criterion 

The Constant Nymph (Warner Bros. Pictures) — July 23 Strand 

This is the Army (Warner Bros. Pictures) — July 28 Hollywood 

Let's Face It (Paramount Pictures) — Aug. 2 Paramount 

DuBarry Was a Lady (Metro-Coldwyn-Mayer Pictures) (c) Capitol 

Mr. Lucky (RKO Radio Pictures) (c) Music Hall 

Bombers' Moon (Twentieth Century-Fox) (c) Rialto 

Squadron Leader (RKO Radio Pictures) — July 22 (a) Palace 

The Falcon in Danger (RKO Radio Pictures) — July 22 (a) Palace 

(a) Dual bill. (b) Subsequent run. (c) Follows current bill. (d) News 

film with English commentary. 



Republic Execs, in Chi. 
For Rogers P.A., Meeting 

Chicago — Opening session of the 
two-day Republic sales meeting here 
on Friday at the Drake Hotel was 
preceded by attendance of Herbert 
J. Yates, Sr., President James R. 
Grainger, Midwest District Sales 
Manager E. L. Walton, and South- 
ern District Sales Manager Merritt 
Davis, plus exchange men from these 
districts and home office officials, at 
the Oriental Theater's opening per- 
formance of Roy Rogers' personal 
appearance in connection with the 
first-run locally of his latest vehicle, 
"Silver Spurs." 

Large crowds greeted the western star in 
the Loop area, and lined up for several blocks 
on either side of the theater. At the sales 
meeting many wires were received from Re- 
public branches throughout the nation report- 
ing large volume of bookings for the new 
Rogers opus. Another indication of current 
Republic product strength outcropped at the 
meeting via receipts of news from Franchise 
Holder Jake Flax of Washington that "Some- 
one to Remember" had broken all house 
records at Baltimore's Valencia, backed by a 
strong promotional campaign. 

Home office representatives at the meeting 
on Saturday included William Saal, Walter 
L. Titus, Jr., and Charles Reed Jones. Ex- 
changemen contingent include Will Baker, 
Chicago; J. G. Frackman, Milwaukee; W. M. 
Grant, Minneapolis; F. R. Moran, Des Moines; 
Harry Lefholtz, Omaha; Nat Steinberg, St. 
Louis; Winfield Snelson, Atlanta; Harold 
Laird, Tampa; J. H. Dillon, Charlotte; N. J. 
Colquhoun, Memphis; L. V. Seicshnaydre, 
New Orleans; Lloyd Rust, Dallas; Russell I. 
Brown, Oklahoma City ; and Franchise Holder 
Robert F. Withers, Kansas City. 



Rites ior John Anderson 

Monroe, Conn. — Funeral services 
for John Anderson, drama critic of 
the New York Journal- American who 
died Friday, were held here Satur- 
day. He had been drama critic of 
the Journal-American and before 
that of the Evening Journal, since 
1928. Survivors include his wife, 
Margaret; his mother, Mrs. Warren 
E. Anderson, Sr.; two sisters and 
eight brothers. 



Bob Gillham to Coast 
For Campaign on FWTBT 

Robert M. Gillham, Para.'s ad- 
publicity chief, left for Los Angeles 
yesterday to direct the opening cam- 
paign for "For Whom the Bell Tolls" 
at the Carthay Circle on Aug. 18. 
Bally in advance will be modeled on 
the campaign for the Rivoli opening 
here which cost Para, about $150,- 
000. 

Planning to remain on the Coast 
for about a fortnight, Gillham in 
the weeks immediately ahead per- 
sonally will concentrate on FWTBT 
openings, including those in Chi- 
cago, where the pic is expected to 
start in two houses, Memphis or 
New Orleans — choice is yet to be 
made but N. O. is favored — and 
Washington. Last named bow will 
come after Labor Day. 

Proceeds of the Coast opening will 
go to the Los Angeles Area War 
Chest. 



Republic Rejects Protest 
Over Dismissal of Three 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Insisting it has au- 
thority under the basic agreement 
with the Screen Publicists Guild to 
make dismissals, Republic has re- 
jected the protest of the Guild over 
the firing of studio publicity depart- 
ment members. 

Al Wilson, labor contact for the 
studio, maintained that employes 
could be dismissed in accordance 
with any collective bargaining agree- 
ment that might exist. Republic 
has agreed to furnish severance pay 
to the employes dismissed. 



Rites Held ior Lawson 

Hollywood — Funeral services for 
Louis Lawson, 41, of the Columbia 
Studio auditing department, were 
held here last week. 



5,000 Special Bookings 
Being Set Up for "Army" 

More than 5,000 special theater 
engagements are being set up for 
"This Is The Army" under a plan 
which Jack L. Warner will put into 
operation today on his arrival in 
New York from the West Coast. A 
large portion of the thousands 
engagements will have special \ 
mieres at advanced prices, following 
in general the policy of the world 
premiere of the film in New York 
at the Hollywood Theater on July 28. 



"So Proudly We Hail" 
At Music Hall Aug. 19 



Paramount's "So Proudly We Hail*' 
will bow in at the Radio City Music 
Hall on Aug. 19, it was learned over 
the week-end. 



NEW YORK 
THEATERS 



RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL 

ROCKEFELLER CENTER 

'THE YOUNGEST PROFESSION' 

with 

VIRGINIA WEIDLER, EDWARD ARNOLD 

and Five Important Guest Stars 

AN M-G-M PICTURE 

Gala Stage Revue • Symphony Oreheitra 

First Mezzanine Seats Reserved. Circle 6-4600 



Jl< BETTY GRABLE JC 

GEORGE MONTGOMERY* CESAR ROMERO 



Cone? hiamd 

A iOTH CfNTUST.FOX flCTUIE lit TECHNICOLOR 

• PLUS A BIG STAGE SHOW * 

BUY Q ^V *y •*#■ 7ihAVE. 

BONDS l\V/A 1 50* ST. 



"DIXIE" - In Persen 

with ~k ANDREWS SISTERS 

BING CROSBY * TIM HERBERT 

DOROTHY LAMOUR if MITCH AYRES 

A Paramount Picture •fc and his orchestra 

Cool PARAMOUNT Times Square 



B WAY & 
47th St. 



RODDY McDOWALL . PRESTON FOSTER 

"MY FRIEND FLICKA" 

and 

ROSEMARY LANE • PATRIC KNOWLES 

"ALL BY MYSELF" 



Lo?w?.STHTEr 


IN PERSON | 


ON SCREEN ■ 


Jackie Miles 1 


"BATAAN" 


Eddie South 1 


WITH 


& ORCH. ! 


ROBERT TAYLOR * 


J 



Monday, July 19, 1943 



\/*\ DULY 



Loew-Lyons to Make 
Three UA Features 



(Continued from Page 1) 

L. Loew is now president, estab- 
lishes offices today in General Ser- 
vice Studios. While its initial block 
o^ "'x for UA calls for three million- 
c__,r pix next season, Loew said 
ovT^ the week-end that eventually 
PA will turn out from 10 to 18 top 
budget features annually. 

New company's, organizational 
blueprint, first announced in late 
January (Film Daily, Jan. 27), as 
finalized provides that top talent, 
both stars and directors, shall be- 
come heads of their own autonomous 
picture-making companies within the 
framework of the parent company 
with each personality enjoying full 
executive and production powers in 
addition to profit participation. 

"At the same time," Lyons ex- 
plained before leaving for the East, 
"each star or other artist will be 
completely free to work outside of 
his own company and will be avail- 
able to the entire industry. But 
there will be behind him a 'home' 
production unit which will, at his 
bidding, make stories of his own 
choosing, by his own methods and 
with profits for his own sharing. In 
this way creative talent will realize 
the greatest possible opportunities 
and security, artistic as well as finan- 
cial." 

PA's first film will be a musical as 
yet untitled, with music by George 
and Ira Gershwin, Jerome Kern, and 
Cole Porter. Ira Gershwin, Kern 
and Porter have already been signed 
— and negotiations are under way 
with Irving Berlin. It will be pro- 
duced and directed by Rouben Ma- 
moulian, who has just returned from 
New York. There will be either in 
new or unpublished compositions 
more than $250,000 invested in mu- 
sic alone, it is declared. 

Loew and Lyons also disclosed or- 
ganization of another major company 
headed by Jack Benny, who will pro- 
duce a series of comedies with him- 
self as star. 




Clemente Giglio Dead 

Clemente Giglio, 57, Italian the- 
ater impresario in the U. S. is dead. 
Survivors include his widow, Gemma; 
a son, Pvt. Sandrino Giglio, USA; 
a daughter, Adele; a brother, Jos- 
eph and four sisters. 





Cuttings From the Wood Lot: 

• • • ONE of the busiest weeks of this or any other Summer 
along local Film Row had its virtual wind-up on Friday noontide when 
the Trade Press bunch broke bread with Sam Wood in the Hotel Astor's 

Yacht Room The producer-director of Paramount's 'Tor Whom the 

Bell Tolls" and the scribes discussed various angles and facets of the 

opus, and a good and enlightening time was had by all Sam is 

of the belief, — and he's in a position to judge — , that "Bell" was "one 
of the toughest of pictures to make," what with the enormous amount of 
location work at high altitude, the climatic conditions under which the 
Technicolor photography was undertaken, the difficulties of terrain, 
and ever so many other factors, not the least of which was the prob- 
lem of sound-interference from brooks in the mountainous-venue 

in some instances, tarpaulins were stretched, fence-like, along several 
hundreds of feet of brook-borders to keep the babble from reaching 
the mikes, and in other cases the tarps were actually stretched hori- 
zontally over the rushing streams and battened down with rocks 

The day airplanes were to fly over the mountain crest for the dramatic 
bombing scenes, a member of Wood's staff hurried up from the valley 
below to tell breathlessly that the Japs had just bombed Pearl Harbor 
and all planes had been grounded 

T T ▼ 

• • • FINDING a locale suitable for the bridge-destruction 

sequences, and in fact the bridge itself, was another vicissitude 

Something was almost invariably wrong, such as a gully being too 

shallow for dramatic and photographic purposes "The Good 

Lord," Sam soliloquized, "didn't know Hemingway was going to write 
the book, so He didn't build everything right" The film's pro- 
duction crew, upon whom Wood heaped praise along with Ingrid 
Bergman, Gary Cooper, and the other cast members for being good 
outdoor people, "killed more rattlesnakes than St. Patrick" 

T T T 

• • • WOOD discussed attentively with the trade scribes the sug- 
gestion that FWTBT have an intermission in its roadshow engagements 
'round the country, instead of being projected all in one big, continuous 
sitting ..... With equal attentiveness he weighed the matter of cut- 
ting down the pic's length somewhat, which may or may not be done, 

but probably will at the concurrence of his Para, associates The 

ace producer-director opines that close to 1,000 feet might be eliminated 
to advantage, and 'twill be interesting to see if this comes to pass before, 

other big key openings outside New York Anent the situation 

faced in the cutting of any film. Wood cited that when he directed the 
Red Grange starrer, "One Minute to Play," the film was cut down for 

a Coast showing in order to theoretically speed it up In the 

process, all immediately agreed, upon seeing the result, that the footage 
did have more momentum, BUT — the vital atmosphere of the football 

yarn was smothered So back went the deleted portions 

One of the most interesting aspects of the chat with Wood was his 
stressing the importance of photographing "thought," i.e., imparting via 
close-ups what a character is thinking, — and you'll note in FWTBT that 

many such shots are incorporated with powerful effect Present at 

the luncheon were Bob Gillham, Al Wilkie, Al Finestone, Don M. Mer- 
sereau, Chester B. Bahn, Charles "Chick" Lewis, Bill Formby, Sherry 
Kane, Tom Kennedy, Mori Krushen, Mel Konnecoff, A. W. Baremore, 
Chick Aaronson, Lou Pelegrine, James Jerauld, and Floyd Stone ...... 

T T T 

• • • AVENGE PEARL HARBOR! 



COMinG and GO I fid 



JACK L. WARNER arrives in New York today 
from the Coast. He will remain through the 
premiere of Irving Berlin's "This Is The Army," 
which Warner co-produced with Hal B. Wa I lis. 

ROBERT M. CILLHAM, who went to the 
Coast yesterday, will remain for a fortnight. 

A. W. SMITH, JR., Eastern sales manager 
of 20th-Fox, will be in Buffalo today for the 
testimonial dinner to be given by the Variety 
Club here for Sydney Samson, recently advanced 
from Buffalo branch manager to district manager 
for Canada. 

B. C. De Sylva left Friday for Hollywood, via 
a stop-over for a day in Toronto. 

NORMAN H. MORAY, A. W. SCHWALBERC, 
HOWARD LEVINSON and ALBERT S. HOWSON 
are en route to New York from San Francisco. 

BEN KALMENSON left San Francisco yesterday 
for a swing through the Southwest en route to 
New York. 

ROY HAINES, en route to New York from the 
Coast, is making stopovers in his Southern and 
Western division. 

B. B. KREISLER, short subject sales manager 
for Universal is due back today from a trip to 
Cleveland and Pittsburgh. 

BERT SANFORD, )R., Altec executive, has 
returned from an upstate New York tour. 

FRED A. ROHRS, PRC Southeastern division 
manager, has returned to his Washington head- 
quarters. 

E. WILLIAM FITELSON and MRS. FITELSON 
are en route to Mexico City. 

WILLIAM CROUCH, Soundies, Inc. executive 
producer, is in town. 

MAX MILDER, Warners British chief, is ex- 
pected to arrive in New York in August. 

VOLDEMAR VETLUGUIN has returned to the 
M-G-M studios. 

WIN BARRON, Paramount's director of sales 
promotion in the Toronto sector, leaves New 
York for his headquarters there today. 

OSCAR F. NEU, head of Neumade Products, 
is in Washington on business. 

JACK KIRSCH has returned to Chicago from 
New York. 

SAM WOOD leaves for the Coast in about 10 
days. 

GEORGE BROWN, Paramount studio publicity 
chief, left New York Saturday for the Coast. 

CHARLES KOERNER, PERRY LIEBER, NAT 
HOLT and RODNEY PANTACES, who came to 
New York for the 12th annual RKO Radio sales 
meet, left New York by train for the Coast via 
Chicago on Friday. 

MURPHY McHENRY of Paramount's coast 
publicity staff left New York Friday for Holly- 
wood. 

ERICH WOLFGANG KORNGOLD arrived Satur- 
day from Hollywood. 

EDWARD SCHNITZER, United Artists Westers 
division manager, returned today from an eight- 
week trip to exchanges under his supervision. 

RISE STEVENS left New York Friday for 
Hollywood. 

BETTY HUTTON left Friday for a two-week 
tour of Army camps under auspices of the 
U.S.O. 

JOSEPH H. MOSKOWITZ, New York rep. of 
20th-Fox Studio, has postponed his trip to 
California until July 30. 



28 Radio Serials 
Set To Plug "Army" 

As part of the vast radio cam- 
paign being put behind Warners 
film version of Irving Berlin's "This 
Is The Army," 28 leading network 
serials already have been set to in- 
sert plugs for the picture in their 
scripts. Mentions of the picture will 
be worked appropriately into the 
dialogue of the serials, and it is 
said it will be the first time a thing 
of this kind has been done on such 
a wide scale. List of shows includes 
practically all the NBC, CBS and 
Mutual network favorites. 



■■ 





motion 



nt of importance for the 
ire-goers and the boxoffice takes 




place in ALDANY- DALLAS- DETROIT - 
OKLAHOMA CITY -ST. LOUIS and npon 

subsequent days in every other key city 
in the United States where the combination 
Trade Showing and Preview of 
^Heaven Can Wait" takes place. We are happy to 
fiiave you judge the potentialities of this picture 
by observing the audience's and your own reaction. 

Results speak louder than words. 
You. Mr. Showman* will see 
for yourself. 




CITY 


PLACE OF SCREENING 


DAY & DATE & HOUR 


Albany 


Madison Theatre 


Mon. 


7/19- 


- 8:30 P.M. 


Atlanta 


Fox Theatre 


Wed 


. 7/2 1- 


- 9:30 P.M. 


Boston 


105 Broadway 


Wed 


.7/21- 


- 2:30 P.M. 


Buffalo 


Shea's Buffalo Theatre 


Thurs 


. 7/22- 


-11:00 P.M. 


Charlotte 


Carolina Theatre 


Fri. 


7/23- 


-10:45 P.M. 


Chicago 


United Artists Theatre 


Wed 


.7/21- 


- 9:00 P.M. 


Cincinnati 


Palace Theatre 


Tues. 


7/20- 


-10:30 P.M. 


Cleveland 


Hippodrome Theatre 


Fri. 


7/30- 


-11:00 P.M. 


Dallas 


Palace Theatre 


Mon. 


7/19- 


-8:15 P.M. 


Denver 


Denver Theatre 


Mon. 


7/26- 


- 8:30 P.M. 


Des Moines 


Des Moines Theatre 


Wed 


. 7/2 1- 


- 9:00 P.M. 


Detroit 


Fox Theatre 


Mon. 


7/19- 


- 9:30 P.M. 


Indianapolis 


Indiana Theatre 


Tues. 


7/27- 


- 8:45 P.M. 


Kansas City 


Plaza Theatre 


Thurs 


7/22- 


- 9:00 P.M. 


Los Angeles 


Carthay Circle Theatre 


Mon. 


8/2- 


- 8:30 P.M. 


Memphis 


Loew's State Theatre 


Wed 


. 7/2 1- 


- 9:30 P.M. 


Milwaukee 


Wisconsin Theatre 


Fri. 


7/23- 


-10:00 P.M. 


Minneapolis 


State Theatre 


Wed 


7/21- 


- 9:30 P.M. 


New Haven 


College Theatre 


Tues. 


7/20- 


- 8:00 P.M. 


New Orleans 


200 So. Liberty Street 


Wed 


7/21- 


- 2:30 P.M. 


New York City 


Roxy Theatre 


Thurs. 


7/29- 


- 8:30 P.M. 


Oklahoma City 


Midwest Theatre 


Mon. 


7/19- 


- 8:30 P.M. 


Omaha 


Paramount Theatre 


Wed. 


7/28— 


• 9:30 P.M. 


Philadelphia 


State Theatre 


Fri. 


7/23- 


- 8:45 P.M. 


Pittsburgh 


Senator Theatre 


Tues. 


7/20— 


• 9:30 P.M. 


Portland 


Paramount Theatre 


Mon. 


7/26- 


- 9:00 P.M. 


St. Louis 


Fox Theatre 


Mon. 


7/19— 


■8:15 P.M. 


Salt Lake City 


Centre Theatre 


Fri. 


7/23- 


- 9:00 P.M. 


San Francisco 


245 Hyde Street 


Wed. 


7/21— 


■ 2:30 P.M. 


Seattle 


Music Box Theatre 


Tues. 


7/27— 


•10:00 P.M. 


Washington 


Columbia Theatre 


Wed. 


7/28- 


- 9:00 P.M. 





CENTURY-FOX 






€ 



01 



ym 






^M^- 



Cl. 



tl 



A^kjf 



CJ^ 



s\ 



t, 




1 AJbwiJ 



M$W 



ik^cl 



RESULTS! 

Above are just a few of the comments 

from the sneak previews held on the 

East and West Coasts 







Monday, July 19, 1943 



Gov't Appeals from 
Crescent Suit Decision 



(Continued from Page 1) 

cited to appear in Washington, D. C, 
within 40 days from date "to show 
cause why the judgment rendered 
against them should not be cor- 
rected." 

The major reason for the Govern- 
ment's action in asking for a cor- 
rection in the decree is indicated by 
the following from a statement by 
Solicitor General Charles Fahy and 
made a part of the appeal: 

"Experience under the tem- 
porary order in the Schine case 
and the consent decree entered 
in the New York equity suit has 
demonstrated that the problem 
of the widespread elimination of 
independent competition by the 
large circuits cannot be solved 
by action taken after the ac- 
quisition occurs, is, as a prac- 
tical matter, impossible to re- 
store by decree of court a com- 
petitive situation after the com- 
petition in question has been 
eliminated by acquisition of the 
competitive theater or theaters. 
Unless the Government is given 
the remedy which the court in 
this case concluded that it was 
entitled to but rejected on ad- 
ministrative considerations, the 
Government believes that it will 
be unable to secure the contin- 
ued existence of independent 
theater competition which the 
Sherman Act contemplates." 
The following "assignment of errors and 
prayer for reversal," which is signed by 
Assistant Attorney General Tom C. Clark 
and Special Assistant Robert L. Wright, re- 
veals what the appellant is seeking to ob- 
tain through this action: "The United States 
of America, plaintiff in the above-titled cause, 
in connection with its petition for appeal 
to the Supreme Court of the United States, 
hereby assigns error to the final order and 
decree of said district court entered on May 
17, 1943, in the above titled cause, and say 
that in the entry of the final order and de- 
cree the District Court committed error to 
prejudice of the said plaintiff in the fol- 
lowing particulars: 

Cite Court's Errors 

"1. The court erred in entering paragraph 
19 of the final decree which reads as fol- 
lows: '(19) that the exhibitor defendants, 
and each of them be, and they hereby are, 
enjoined and restrained from acquiring a 
financial interest in any additional theaters, 
outside Nashville, Tenn., in any town where 
there is already located a theater, whether 
in operation or not, unless the owner of 
such theater should volunteer to sell to 
either of the exhibitor defendants, and when 
none of said defendants, their officers, agents 
or servants are guilty of any of the acts 
or practices prohibited paragraph nine (9) 
hereof." 

"2. The court erred in declining to enter 
in lieu of said paragraph (19) of the final 
decree the provision contained in paragraph 
29 of the proposed decrees submitted in ac- 
cordance with the court's conclusion of law 
No. 20, which provision reads as follows: 
" 'That the exhibitor defendants and 
each of them be, and they hereby are, 
enjoined and restrained from acquiring 
a financial interest in any additional the- 
aters outside of Nashville, Tenn. Ex- 
cept after an affirmative showing before 
this court that such acquisition will not 
unreasonably restrain competition.' 
"Wherefore, plaintiff prays that the final 
order and decree of the District Court grant- 
ing the relief set forth in paragraph 19 
thereof and denying relief in accordance with 
the court's aforesaid conclusions of law No. 



Six Two-Reel Westerns 
On New Warner Program 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Norman H. Moray, shorts sales man- 
ager, as the company wound up its 
series of three regional sales meet- 
ings with Ben Kalmenson, sales 
chief, presiding. Thirteeen of the 
one-reelers will be re-issues. 

Program, to be wholly made at 
the Burbank studios with Jack War- 
ner supervising, will include a great- 
er number of subjects in Techni- 
color and will be marked by more 
diversification in content. Individ- 
ual series include: 

Twelve two-reel Featurettes. Six will be 
Santa Fe Trail Westerns. Other six will be 
Featurettes, a diversified group, ranging from 
kiddie revues and all-girl musicals to drama. 
. Six two-reel Technicolor Specials. Pro- 
duced in co-operation with various branches 
of the armed forces, these will be along the 
lines of "A Ship is Born." 

Twenty-Six one-reel Merrie Melodies and 
Looney Tunes, in Technicolor. Cartoons pro- 
duced by Leon Schlesinger. 

Thirteen one-reel Sports Parades, in Tech- 
nicolor. Exclusive material from various 
fields of sports. 

Ten one-reel Melody Masters Bands. Each 
subject will be made an intimate musical re- 
vue, taking the band "Off the bandstand" 
for the first time and featuring a. group of 
specialties. 

Six one-reel Vitaphone Varieties. Novelty 
numbers, including another Howard Hill an- 
imal thriller. 

Thirteen one-reel Blue Ribbon Merrie Melo- 
dies, A 'Hall of Fame' group representing 
the best output of Schlesinger's cartoon 
subjects. 



Vacation 'A' Gas Order 
Stirs New Eng. Protests 

(Continued from Page 1) 

the drastic regulations of the past 
several months. 

But to their disappointment they 
find that the new regulations ac- 
tually work to the point of taking 
customers away. For it means that 
the man who wishes to drive to Ban- 
gor, some 300 miles, may obtain 
permission to do so if he uses his 
"A" cards. But the man who wishes 
to pile five kids and the wife into 
the car and drive down to a Summer 
picture theater or even to one of 
the suburbans still may not do so. 

The OPA is being besieged with 
inquiries as to why-the-heck it's all 
right for John Jones to drive to 
Montreal, but entirely wrong for 
Bill Smith to drive to Revere Beach. 



Trade Press Dines at '21', 
Sees "Heaven" Tonight 



Trade press screening of 20th- 
Fox's new Ernst Lubitsch produc- 
tion, "Heaven Can Wait," will be 
held tonight at 8:45 at the RKO 
23rd Street Theater, and prior to 
the showing, trade press represen- 
tatives will be guests at a dinner 
in the 21 Club, starting at 6:30 
p.m., which will be hosted by Sam 
Shain, director of trade relations 
for 20th-Fox. 

Charles Coburn, one of the prin- 
cipal actors in the new Lubitsch pic- 
ture, will be a special guest at the 
dinner and subsequent screening. 



20 may be reversed and the cause remanded 
for the entry in lieu of said paragraph of a 
provision in accordance with said conclusions 
of law and/or such other and fit relief as 
the court may deem just and proper." 



Warners Pix Tie Up 
Stockholm Theater 

Stockholm (By Air Mail) — Warners 
has tied up the Park Theater, local 
deluxe house with a policy of long- 
run engagements. As a consequence, 
Warner product in release will play 
this theater exclusively, starting with 
the new season in August. 



Await Hoyt Ruling 

On Length of "Aleutians" 

(Continued from Page 1) 

ture industry. Palmer Hoyt, domes- 
tic director of the OWI, said Fri- 
day night that he expected to reach 
a decision this week-end on whether 
the agency shall clear for public 
showing the 50 minute version of 
the Army's "Report from the Aleu- 
tians." Although a shorter version, 
in two reels, is also available, the 
Army is insisting that the long ver- 
sion be shown in the nation's the- 
aters. 

Hoyt admitted Friday that he had 
decided earlier last week to recom- 
mend that the WAC be given its 
choice of the two versions, or al- 
lowed to take both. The film itself, 
made in full color by Capt. John 
Huston, is of exceptional merit com- 
pared with other Army films, and 
is certainly worthy of public show- 
ing. Its timeliness is waning, how- 
ever, while the Army holds out for 
the long version. 

Hoyt is well aware of the seriousness of 
the situation. He recognizes that the strong 
stand of the Army is now a test of the 
OWI, to determine whether that agency, 
without its motion picture bureau and with- 
out Lowell Mellett, will continue to exer- 
cise its full authority to clear Government 
picture releases, and whether OWI will, as 
did Mellett, continue to consider seriously 
the very real objections of the motion pic- 
ture industry to being forced to schedule 
odd-sized rent-free pictures. 

Hoyt decided last week to let the industry 
have its choice, but the Army's Bureau of 
Public Relations has now taken the position 
that the long picture must be shown or none 
at all. 

Hoyt is well aware of the importance of 
his decision, recognizing that if he gives 
away to the Army in this matter his posi- 
tion as clearance authority for Government 
films is very shaky. He will provide by his 
decision a rather definite indication of where 
the power regarding public showing for Army 
films lies hereatfer. If Hoyt bends to the 
pressure of the Army, the industry must 
then prepare for similar pressure — and prob- 
ably more effective. Complicating the mat- 
ter is the fact that the Army has on hand 
at least 200 full-color prints of the long 
version of "Report From the Aleutians." 
The figure may be closer to 300. 



Actors Equity Regulation 
Blocks FitzPatrick Plan 



St. Louis — The Actors Equity reg- 
ulation prohibiting the filming of 
any part of a show without payment 
to the stage company of an extra 
full week's salary has forced James 
A. FitzPatrick, producer of travel- 
ogue shorts for M-G-M, to alter his 
plans to include in his newest re- 
lease scenes from a performance at 
the St. Louis Municipal Opera. The 
shots would have cost the producer 
an additional $10,000 to make the 
short, which is about St. Louis. 



First-Runs Weekly 
For Overseas Troops 



(Continued from Page 1) 

three new shows each week, said the 
Army over the week-end, each in- 
cluding one feature and one sYT^ 

These programs are flown 1 
larly to 18 overseas exchanges oy 
the Special Service Division, and, 
as revealed in Film Daily last week, 
over 4,400 feature prints and over 
6,400 shorts had been sent abroad 
by the end of last month. The Spe- 
cial Service Division is especially 
proud of the frequent premieres 
which it offers American soldiers in 
the thick of the war. 

Although most of the new films sent over- 
sea circulate among the troops simultane- 
ously with their public showings here, on 
several occasions the Special Service Divi- 
sion has been able to screen outstanding pix 
considerably in advance of their opening here. 

A recent check by the division showed 
that of the pictures being advertised in the 
New York City papers, 33 already had been 
sent to overseas troops. Once abroad, of 
course, prints are not immediately seen by 
every soldier in a theater of operations, but 
move from one unit to another, with those 
on the end of the list inevitably somewhat 
behind. 

The present print order is 23. A recent 
report from the Persian Gulf on the en- 
thusiasm of soldiers over their opportunity 
of seeing pix from home included the com- 
ment that each film makes a circuit of 1,500 
miles by plane, motor and rail before being 
returned to the Cairo exchange. 

The Special Service Division has a grow- 
ing number of projectors overseas, many of 
which tour on jeeps. There are some per- 
manent Army movie houses abroad, but more 
often the screenings are held outdoors, the 
audience sitting in a semi-circle on benches, 
much the same as in the sunset concert 
amphitheaters popular in this country. 



Authorizations for Film 
180 Days Old Cancelled 

(Continued from Page 1) 

L-178. Producers of entertainment 
films will probably not be greatly af- 
fected if at all, but the producers 
of factual films, even on Government 
contracts may in some cases lose the 
use of film which they had been 
counting on. The amendment will 
hit, in the main, said one WPB of- 
ficial, producers whose "eyes were 
bigger than their stomachs." Sev- 
eral firms had obtained authorization 
for films as long ago as one year, 
used less than they had estimated 
for the immediate project at hand 
and thus had the authority for ad- 
ditional footage. If they used the 
additional footage at once they were 
all right, but if they waited the bal- 
ance of the unauthorized film was 
cancelled by the amendment. 

All authorizations written lately 
have contained time limits assuring 
reasonable early use of the authori- 
zation. Film producers and labora- 
tories, however, report that some 
old authorizations are still being 
used, with film production schedul- 
ing threatened by this unknown 
"floating demand." 



Rufus E. McCosh Dead 

Baltimore — Rufus E. McCosh, who 
engaged in free lance title work in 
the silent era, died here last week. 



Wk* 


***** fSW'* ^w- ■ 

1 


j^g**"* -*■**. ^^^^(H t 




IP^'* ""* 48L %*. '**^f ^8 


■r, *<* «r a. ^i 

\ 1 

* * 


WBmm ■ ■■<<-■ ■■ 











00 



^9fe» 



'*i¥vm fo **¥< 



with Stars in Her Eyes! 
with Deanna in His Arms! 
V.with Terrific Raves! 



"Deanna Durbin scores her happiest grown-up 
portrayal in 'Hers to Hold,' a delightful modern 
comedy that opens up a brand new career for its 
star ... It remained for this Felix Jackson produc- 
tion to strike exactly the right note that will send 
the Durbin stock to its all-time high . . .in the 
immediate hit classification. Directed by Frank 
Ryan with a finesse which is buoyantly refreshing." 
• — Hollywood Reporter 



"This latest Deanna Durbin feature is right up to 

the minute, tuneful, entertaining, with sure-fire 

audience appeal. Co-starred with Joseph Gotten, 

actress turns in one of her most engaging and 

captivating performances . . . Picture should gross 

at the box office as a top Durbin presentation, and 

should be billed as such." 

— Daily Variety 



"If this isn't the best picture Deanna Durbin has 
ever made it will serve in that classification until 
a better one comes along. La Durbin has shed 
the last semblance of adolescence to emerge a 
glamorous, alluring, talented actress without loss 
of her golden voice. Certainly no picture could 
have' such strong appeal to the funny-bone and 
the heart without proving a boxoffice bonanza." 

— Boxoffice 



"Deanna Durbin's glamor and charm vie with 
her gorgeous singing voice in 'Hers to Hold.' She 
has developed into a charming and talented 

comedienne." 

— Louella Parsons 



"Deanna is more glamorous than ever." 

— Erskine Johnson, N.E.A, 



"Deanna Durbin is at her best in this latest offer- 
ing, in a role that shows her to be an exciting and 
glamorous star. It should prove to be one of the 
best boxoffice grossers of all the Durbin pictures. 
The fans will thrill with her in her every emotion." 

— Showmen's Trade Review 




DEANNA 

DdHBDI 





CHARLES WINNINGl 

Screen Play by Lewis R.I 

1 




A*l 





"Deanna Durbin again flashes forth as one of the 
screen's greatest stars— this time with a new viva- 
cious love allure distinctly all her own. In this 
one she very definitely registers glamor, but it is 
richer than as designated by the common use of 
the word. Since it is wholesome glamor — and 
all-American glamor — everyone will idealize and 

idolize." 

— Hollywood Motion Picture Review 



"This movie is chuckful of modern day fun, plenty 
of laughs and a tear or two. Deanna's tops!" 



■Jimmy Starr, Motion Picture Editor, 
Los Angeles Herald and Express 



"Deanna is prettier and singing more beautifully 

than ever." 

— Harold Swisher, Motion Picture Editor, 
United Press Radio Service 



"Solid entertainment set for big grosses. It gives 
Deanna Durbin her greatest opportunity. This pic- 
ture also ushers Deanna into the ranks of the 
grownups, and she shows certain charm in her 

new maturity." 

— The Exhibitor 



"Deanna fares very well in the hands of her new 
producing-directing combination of Felix Jackson 
and Frank Ryan, who deliver a product of high 
boxoffice potentialities and strong promotional 
qualities . . . she is charming and lovely . . . and 
as the lady continues to grow in maturity so does 
her performance and vocal capacity, reflected here 
by renditions of mellow depth." 

— Motion Picture Daily 



"One of Deanna Durbin's strongest b.o. films . . . 
in "Hers to Hold" Deanna Durbin successfully 
and permanently completes transition from cine- 
matic subdeb to young ladyhood. Felix Jackson, 
as the star's producer, clicks solidly. He gets able 

assistance in direction by Frank Ryan." 

— Variety 



EVELYN ANKERS • GDS SCHILLING • NELLA WALKER • LUDWIG STOSSEL 

Based on a story by John D. Klorer • Directed by FRANK RYAN • Produced by FELIX JACKSON • Associate Producer, FRANK SHAW 



10 



Monday, July 19, 1943 



War Shorts Program 
Waifs on Conference 



{Continued from Page 1) 

luncheon session at the Hotel Astor, 
dealt with the possible role of the 
industry in formulating a construc- 
tive program designed to educate 
'teen-age youngsters of both sexes 
to their role in a war-time America. 
Gamble, calling the theater Bond is- 
suing agents the "cash-registers" of 
the Tresaury Department, asked the 
aggressive, comprehensive participa- 
tion of the industry in the forthcom- 
ing Third War Loan, beginning Sept. 
9. 

While no official announce- 
ment emanated from WAC re- 
garding the screen program of 
war information, it is understood 
to include tentatively 52 re- 
leases, 26 to be one- or two- 
reel subjects, and 26 shorter 
subjects requiring speedy na- 
tional coverage, which may be 
shipped by the newsreels. 

The 26 full-length shorts would 
play off — to the customary 15,- 
000-odd theaters — in 16 weeks. 
The shorter screen messages 
would get national screen cover- 
age in six weeks. 
Francis S. Harmon, WAC ex- 
ecutive vice-chairman, made it clear 
that no official statement would be 
forthcoming from WAC until after 
further conference with the Holly- 
wood Division of WAC, the News- 
reel Division and Palmer Hoyt, OWI 
Director of Domestic Operations. 

S. H. Fabian, Theaters Division chairman, 
opened the meeting of that Division, held in 
the morning-. Harmon read co-op. pledges 
from WAC Area Chairmen unable to attend 
and a report on finances was given by Arthur 
L. Mayer, treasurer. 

Herman Gluckman, assistant to the chair- 
man of the Distributors Division, reported 
that with the efficient distribution set-up ar- 
ranged by the Division headed by William 
F. Rodgers, the average OWI- WAC subject 
received between 15,000 and 16,000 book- 
ings. Record-high booking was established 
by "Paratroops," which got 15,719 bookings 
in 22 weeks. 

Vote War Loan Participation 

Gamble's address to the joint bodies was 
considered one of the most impressive tributes 
to the industry ever delivered by a Govern- 
ment official. The War Finance chief de- 
clared that the 4,700 theaters which have 
been designated official issuing agents for 
securities represented 10 per cent of all the 
Treasury's outlets for. Bonds and in some 
cases more Bonds were sold in theaters than 
in post offices. Industry participation in 
I the Third War Loan was voted unanimously. 

Fabian, reiterating the pledge that the in- 
dustry would do all in its power to accom- 
plish the results needed, declared that with 
the assistance of Oscar A. Doob, chairman 
of the Public Relations Division, and a spe- 
cial campaign committee, the best campaign 
possible would be outlined. First move will 
be to increase the number of issuing agents. 
The Treasury is working on an arrangement 
to make WAC state bond chairmen official 
members of the various state Treasury War 
Savings Staffs. 

Kenneth Thomson, chairman of the Holly- 



HOLLYWOOD DIGEST 



You Said It, Gal! 

Today's short short story comes 
via the marquee of the Washington 
Theater, Amsterdam Ave. at 149th 
St: 

"Edge of Darkness" 
"No Place for a Lady." 



SIGNED 

STEPHEN LONGSTREET, writer. Vanguard Films. 

WILLIAM CASTLE, director, Columbia. 

CEORCE CIVOT, termer, RKO. 

DOROTHY FORD, termer, M-G-M. 

HENRY and PHOEBE EPHRON, writers, 20th- 
Fox. 

ALEXANDER GRANACH, "The Girl from Lenin- 
grad, Cregor Rabinovitch-UA. 

RAMSEY AMES, termer, Universal. 

ASSIGNMENTS 

WILLIAM CASTLE, director, "Brothers Under the 
Skin," Columbia. 

LOUISE RANDALL PIERSON, screenplay, "Rough- 
ly Speaking," Warners. 

VINCENTE MINNELLI, director, "Heavenly 
Body," M-C-M. 

AL HALL, "My Client Curly," M-G-M. 

ROBERT KANE, co^producer, "The Sullivans,"' 
20th-Fox. 

HARRY FLANNERY, art director, "The Padre," 
Paramount. 

ARCHIE MAYO, director, "Army Wife," 20th- 
Fox. 
DAVE CHUDNOW and JAY CHERNISS, music, 

"Harvest Melody," Walter Colmes-PRC. 

JOHNNY MATTISON, dance director, "Harvest 

Melody," Walter Colmes-PRC. 
WILLIAM CASTLE, director, "The Gamble of 

Boston Blackie," Columbia. 

CASTINGS 

AGNES MOOREHEAD and GEORGE GIVOT, 
"Government Girl," RKO; HERBERT MARSHALL 



and BONITA GRANVILLE, "Andy Hardy's Blonde 
Trouble," M-C-M; HORACE McNALLY, ROBERT 
MIDDLEMASS, HOWARD FREEMAN, ROY GOR- 
DON, ERVILLE ALDERSON and HAROLD LAN- 
DON, "America," M-G-M; ROBERT SULLY, "The 
Heavenly Body," M-G-M; SIDNEY BLACKMER, 
"Broadway Rhythm," M-G-M; HENRY O'NEILL, 
"A Guy Named Joe," M-G-M; THOMAS MIT- 
CHELL, "Buffalo Bill," 20th-Fox; EDWARD 
FIELDING, "The Story of Dr. Wassell," Para- 
mount; HERBERT RAWLINSON, "Doughboys in 
Ireland," Columbia. 

CHARES RUGGLES, "Our Hearts Were Young 
and Gay," Paramount; HERBERT RUDLEY, "Rhap- 
sody in Blue," Warners; WALLACE BEERY, 
"Rationing," M-C-M; ROBERT HAYNES, "Is 
Everybody Happy," Columbia; MIMI FORSAYTHE, 
"The Cirl from Leningrad," Columbia; JOHN 
CARFIELD, "Deep Valley," Warners; THE ROSS 
SISTERS, "Broadway Rhythm," M-G-M; MICHAEL 
DUANE, "When My Baby Smiles at Me," Colum- 
bia; JOHNNY MACK BROWN and RAYMOND 
HATTON, "The Kansas Kid," Monogram; MYRNA 
DELL, "Lone Ranger No. 6," PRC; JUDY COOK, 
"Talent School," PRC. 

GEORGE SANDERS, "Nine Lives," RKO; 
STEPHANIE BACHELOR and MARION PIERCE, 
"His Butler's Sister," Universal; JACK HALEY, 
"One Body Too Many," and "Rhythm Ranch," 
Paramount; DAME MAY WHITTY, "Gas Light," 
M-C-M; RAMSAY AMES, "Ali Baba and the 
Forty Thieves," Universal; BILLIE BURKE, 
"Cildersleeve On Broadway," RKO; JONATHAN 
HALE, "Jack London," Samuel Bronston-UA; 
THE ANDREWS SISTERS, "Sailors on Horseback" 
and "Hip, Hip, Hooray," Universal; WILLIAM 



Reduced Scope for 
U.S.N. Incentive Pix 



Exhib. Research Guiding WB 

Prime Factor in Strong Financial Position 



{Continued ft 

time peak while number of releases 
has been the smallest in the com- 
pany's history, the sales department 
Was guided largely by the findings 
of intensive research in the exhibi- 
tion field. 

Warners' extensive theater hold- 
ings, located in cities of all sizes 
and under all conditions of opera- 
tion, enabled the company to make 
a thorough study of every phase of 
exhibition and find out for itself ex- 
actly what confronts every type of 
exhibitor including those in commu- 
nities affected by wartime changes. 
Own Experience Cited 

With this data in hand, the sales 
department under Ben Kalmenson 
not only has been able to meet the 
problems of its exhibitor customers 
with fuller understanding and more 
practical co-operation through its 
"open door policy," but the findings 
of the Warner research department 
made it possible for the sales staff 
to convince many exhibitors that 
certain policies, notably extended 
runs, could be made profitable in 
their particular situations, by show- 
ing how it had been done in com- 
parable spots on the Warner circuit. 



om Page 1) 

This procedure is chiefly credited with 
helping to boost the company's accounts to 
what is understood to be the highest total 
ever attained by any film company, and re- 
sulting in Warner sales being $7,000,000 over 
quota in the first 40 weeks of this season. 

In analyzing Warners' improved financial 
status and estimating that third-quarter prof- 
its should top $2,000,000, as compared with 
$1,570,000 in 1942, the Dow-Jones service 
cites the company's unusual accomplishment 
in retirement of funded debt from a total 
of $126,000,000 in 1931 to slightly more 
than $30,000,000 this year; the savings in 
interest charges effected by recent refinancing 
which included retirement of all 6 per cent 
debentures and all preferred stock; substan- 
tial savings in operations through the pur- 
chase of property formerly leased and by the 
expiration of old unprofitable leases; excep- 
tionally strong position in the way of in- 
ventories of completed and paid-for pictures, 
and the excellent working capital position. 
For Debt Retirement 

Company has had about $5,000,000 annu- 
ally in cash available from its depreciation 
reserves for use in debt retirement, and in 
the current year the net earnings will pro- 
vide another $8,000,000, or about $13,- 
000.000 in all. Debt has been retired in 
amounts of from $4,500,000 to $8,000,000 
annually, and this year about $4,800,000 
paid off up to May 29. 

Because of the basic financial policy of the 
company to continue wiping out funded in- 
debtedness, Dow-Jones says the indications 
are that no very large dividends will be paid 
on the common stock in the near future, 
although the board may consider a moderate 
dividend toward the end of this year. 



wood Victory Committee, and member of 
the WAC Hollywood Division, indicated that 
star participation via the "Caravan" would 
be possible. A "Heroes Caravan," with some 
screen personality as an emcee for each group, 
is also under consideration. 

Following Taft's address, a committee of 
seven was authorized to study and formu- 
late a practical youth program. Membership 
will comprise three from the Theater Divi- 
sion, two from the Hollywood Division, and 
one each from the Distributors and Public 
Relations Division. 

To Further Study NEIC 

Meeting concluded with a discussion of 
the National Industry Entertainment Coun- 
cil. George J. Sehaefer, who has been elected 
to the chairmanship of that body, outlined 



its aims and purposes. A committee will 
further study WAC affiliation with the NEIC. 
Attending, in addition to those mentioned, 
were: N. Peter Rathvon, Jack Alicoate, 
Adolph Zukor, Charles Moscowitz, Abe Last- 
fogel, Max Weisfelt, Sam Rinzler, John J. 
O'Connor, Walton G. Ament, Lou Golding, 
Sam Rosen, W. Crockett, Herman Robbins, 
M. A. Rosenberg, Nate Tamins, Maurice 
Wright, Ike Libson, Edward L. Alperson, 
Barney Balaban, Adrian McCalman, Joseph 
Hazen, Wm. F. Rodgers, H. M. Richey, Jules 
J. Rubens, Ed Kuykendall, Bob Wilby, Sam 
Morris, Dan Michalove, Phil Reisman, Bob 
O'Donnell, Leon J. Bamberger, Jack Cohn, 
Joseph Bernhard, Leonard Goldenson, W. C. 
Michel, Harry Lowenstein, Robert Paskow, 
Sam Shain, Don Jacocks, I. J. Hoffman, Sam 
Wheeler, Spyros Skouras. 



Allied Issues Brochure 
On Juvenile Delinquency 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Navy's original announcement in- 
dicated. One film has been com- 
pleted, another is nearly completed, 
and there is a possibility that tb~~^e 
more may be made. Actually,^ J 
program is smaller than that of h.« 
Army, which has already turned out 
seven of these incentive films, and 
has another in the works. The same 
distribution facilities are used by 
both services. 

The films are designated as "shots 
in the arm" for production, and will 
enjoy very limited circulation — "no 
more than 10 or 15 prints." The 
first film — on "De-boats, Submarine 
Fighters" — runs two reels, and others 
are expected not to average over 15 
minutes. The second Navy film deals 
with Guadalcanal and is designed to 
show workers in several plants pro- 
ducing for the Navy the importance 
of the work they are doing. 

The Army has been working on a similar 
program for some months, with Maj. Dick 
Maybaum in charge of production. The 
program is carried on through the Industrial 
Service Division of the Bureau of Public 
Relations. 

As for commercial production, said the 
Navy spokesman, it is probable that some 
commercial footage will be used in produc- 
ing these films, but it will be used to "fill 
in." 

Both Army and Navy officers said they 
were quite surprised that the production 
of incentive films had suddenly come in for 
so much publicity. After all, said they, 
"movies are only a minor part of this pro- 
gram, and we don't have the time or the 
desire to go into competition with Holly- 
wood." 

A civilian official concerned in the gen- 
eral situation here, however, implied that 
more may have been contemplated, and that 
the Navy release was put out as a "feeler" 
to get the indiistry reaction. "There are 
49.000.000 guys around here that want to 
be De Milles," he said, adding that Harold 
Hopper. WPB motion picture chief, and 
Lowell Mellett, former OWI film chief, have 
curbed the ambitions of these aspirants here- 
tofore. If these ambitions had not been 
stepped upon, he continued, Government raw 
stock allocations of 30,000.000 feet — exclud- 
ing Army and Navy footage, would have 
had to be closer to 300.000.000. 



Chicago — National Allied's com- 
mittee on juvenile delinquency, 
headed by Jack Kirsch of this city, 
at the week-end released a brochure 
pointing up the results of its cam- 
paign to enlist the nation's screens 
to help combat the spreading men- 
ace of kid hoodlumism and vandal- 
ism, and expressing gratification "at 
the quick and favorable response it 
has received from the producers to 
this important appeal." Brochure 
reprints Film Daily's recent editor- 
ial and other Film Daily news sto- 
ries as well as news stories from 
other trades. 



Jules Bledsoe Dead 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Jules Bledsoe, 44, 
Negro opera and musical comedy 
baritone, is dead. He appeared in 
both the stage and film versions of 
"Show Boat." 



Monday, July 19, 1943 



<W 



DAILY 



11 



"Super-Escapist" Pix r 
Paramount' s Plan 



(Continued from Page 1) 

seen the greatest incentive for the 
production of better pictures than 
Hollywood ever has known," Agnew 
;aH that the quality of Paramount 
S. ct today had attained a level 
'\^vi*h producers would have viewed 
>vith glowing pride two or three 
years hence under normal condi- 
;ions." 

As an example of the company's 
extensive program of "super-escap- 
:st" pictures to come, Agnew cited 
'Let's Face It," Bob Hope-Betty 
Hutton starrer. As for Technicolor 
oroductions, the sales head referred 
to FWTBT, "The Story of Dr. Was- 
sell," "Riding High," "Lady in the 
Dark" and "Frenchman's Creek." 

"The technical advances in color 
have been so rapid that it seems each 
new picture brings something that 
never has been done before," Agnew 
asserted. 

While there has been mention of 
varying figures for the new sea- 
son's lineup, no definite announce- 
ment was forthcoming at the two- 
day sales session. Agnew contended 
himself with enumerating some dozen 
pictures, all previously disclosed and 
many already completed. 

Roster included in addition to those 
listed above: 

"Riding High," "So Proudly We 
Hail," "True to Life," "The Miracle 
of Morgan's Creek,' "No Time for 
Love," "The Uninvited," "Hostages." 



Lee Warns Para. Sales Force 
On Inequities in District 

Need for "eternal vigilance that 
no case of unfairness and inequity 
occurs inadvertently in your dis- 
trict, or having occurred inadver- 
tently, remains unadjusted" was 
stressed by Claude Lee, Para.'s di- 
rector of public relations, in ad- 
dressing the company's sales meet- 
ing at the Hotel Pierre Friday. 

"This responsibility rests heavily 
upon the shoulders of your district 
managers, to whom your department 
heads must look for thorough inves- 
tigation and intelligent considera- 
tion of any complaint that may 
arise," declared Lee. 

Other speakers included Oscar A. Morgan, 
shorts sales chief: Neil Agrnew. sales head: 
Charles M. Reapan. assistant sreneral sales 
manager: Hugrh Owen. Eastern division man- 
ager; Georpe Smith. Western division man- 
ager; Robert M. Gillham. ad-publicity direc- 
tor: Stanley Shuford, ad manager. Alec 
Moss, exploitation manager; George Brown, 
studio publicity manager; Louis Phillips, 
legal dept. : J. A. Walsh, chief statistician. 

The meeting wound up with division man- 
agers' conferences with the district managers 



STORKS 



Chicago — A son, David Michael, 
was born in Grant Hospital here 
to Mr. and Mrs. Michael Honigberg. 
Father now associate editor of the 
Billboard was formerly Film Daily 
staff correspondent in Pittsburgh. 



Wotta Memory! 

The boys were swapping trade 
recollections between sessions at 
Para.'s sales meeting at the Hotel 
Pierre Friday. 

"I remember when De M i lie made 
'The Squaw Man,' began one. 

"That's nothing," broke in an- 
other, "I remember when you could 
get a good steak." 

The gabfest adjourned right there. 



Watertown, Mass., Houses 
In Clearance Complaints 

(Continued from Page 1) 

45 days granted the Capitol and 60 
days granted the Warner are un- 
reasonable. Company asked that 
maximum clearance be set at 30 
days in all cases and that when a 
picture is moved over to the Elm St. 
from the Plaza, the 30 days start on 
the last day of the Plaza run. 

In the other complaint, Water- 
town Square Theater Co., operator 
of the Strand, Watertown, Mass., 
filed against all five claiming that 
the clearance granted the Coolidge 
is unreasonable and asking reduc- 
tion to seven days. At present Loew's 
gives the Coolidge 14 days, 20th- 
Fox gives 21 days while RKO and 
Vitagraph give 30 days. 



Veronica Lake Loses Son 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Prematurely born son 
of Veronica Lake is dead. Child 
was born after Miss Lake suffered a 
fall at her studio. 



and a session of the district advertising repre- 
sentatives, all of whom attended the two- 
day meeting. 

Friday evening, the delegates attended a 
special screening of "True to Life," one of 
the important pictures on the new season's 
schedule, and "Mardi Gras." first of the new 
series of two-reel "Musical Parades," in Tech- 
nicolor. 

Gillham praised Al Wilkie and his staff for 
the fine publicity campaign on FWTBT. Dele- 
gates gave Wilkie an ovation. 



Paramount Adds 12 to 
One Hundred Per Cent Club 

Ten Paramount salesmen and two 
booking managers have been selected 
for membership in the company's 
One Hundred Per Cent Club of 1943 
as having shown the most progress 
and put forth the most effort during 
last year, Neil Agnew, general sales 
manager, announced at the final ses- 
sion of the company's two-day sales 
meeting at the Pierre Hotel, Friday. 
The company awards each member 
a $3,000 life insurance policy. 

Salesmen named to the Club are 
Edward H. Bell. New York; Weldon 
A. Waters, Albany; Herbert C. 
Thompson, Washington; William 
Twig, Cincinnati; William W. Sharpe, 
Charlotte; Thomas Frank, Des 
Moines; Harry H. Haas, Los An- 
geles; Donald R. Hicks, Salt Lake 
City; Irving J. Werthamer, Milwau- 
kee; Walter P. Wiens, Dallas. The 
booking managers are James R. 
Velde, Detroit, and John E. Kent, 
Seattle. 



Harmon, Disney, Fly On 
Inter-Amer. U of the Air 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington— Francis S. Harmon, 
WAC executive secretary, Walt Dis- 
ney and FCC Chairman James Law- 
rence Fly will appear on the NBC 
radio program Inter-American Uni- 
versity of the Air on July 31, it was 
learned here Friday. Several other 
important figures in motion pictures 
and radio may also be heard. 



Mike Cianciolo, Memphis 
Nabe Operator, Stricken 

Memphis — Funeral services were 
held here Saturday for Mike Cian- 
ciolo, owner and operator of the 
Rosemary and Lincoln, local nabes, 
whose death occurred Friday from a 
heart attack. Cianciolo, native of 
Italy but a resident of Memphis 
since childhood, had been active in 
various charities. His widow, two 
sons and five daughters survive. 



Along the Rialto 



Film Daily Year Book 
Fuii of Fascinating 
Facts a^d Figures — 



Nearly 12 Thousand 
Twin-Bill Theatres; 
Chatter 'n' Comment 



By WILL BALTIN 

Motion Picture Editor 

^fHEN IT COMES TO BOOKS of the year, The Film Daily 
Year Book wins our vote as the most engrossing volume 
of film facts and figures to reach this desk. Each spring we 
look forward with eagerness to its arrival, for within its covers 
is recorded motion picture history of the past year in brief, terse 
style plus considerable information of immense value to a 
motion picture critic and editor * * * I keep my copy of the 
year book under lock and key and thus have it available for 
instant reference when you 'phone this department seeking in- 
formation about your favorite player, the address of Pathe 
News, etc. * * * Last week our copy of the 25th anniversary 
issue of Film Daily Year Book arrived, bound in an attractive 
cover of blue and white * * * We spent a pleasant few hours 
thumbing through its abundant pages, devouring its palatable 
contents and digesting a wealth of information. 

Statistics as a general rule are cut [ "^ 

and dried but in the Film Daily Year : every day in pictures last year. Story 
Book they provide fascinating read- purchases by studios amounted to 
ing. We found the "Industry Sta- ! $4,975,000, with $300,000 being the 
tistics" portion of the 1,000-page top price paid to Maxwell Anderson 
volume of particular interest. For < for "Eve of St. Mark" and John 
example: Steinbeck for "The Moon is Down." 

Capital invested in the U. S. film ; 

industry is listed at $2,061,000,000. _. , ,,■<.-+*,.„., 
There are 200,000 persons employed , Figures show that 11,160 theatres 
in the industry, with an average an-! ar ? PJ^ng d °uble features while 
nual payroll of $325,725,000. ^ 6 > 568 are offering single bills. 
The average daily film rental per 

Approximate annual taxes paid to j U - . S ; theatre is listed at only $35— 
the Federal Government by the in-! wh .V ch was qulte a sur P nse to tms 

dustry is $360,589,600. And $65,512,- : writer. 

358 was spent in newspaper and 

magazine adve rtising during 1942. There is one mot i n picture the- 
, ~~~ , . atre seat for every 12 inhabitants in 

The annual Hollywood payroll is the tj. s the year book states, and 

listed as $157,300,000. And cost of there is one mot i n picture theatre 

film production last year approxi- j open in the tj. s. for every 8,000 

mated $198,500,000. persons. The average run of any 

— ; __„ picture is 3% days per theatre and 

We learned that there were 550 avera ge number of showings is 2Yz 
actors and actresses under contract times daily. 

last year, and that 376 features were j 

produced during the 12-month peri- 
od. We also found that the cost of 
negatives for photographing a fea- 
ture picture is $336,600, and thai it 
takes about 22 days to shoot an 
average film. 



Average weekly attendance at 
U. S. movie houses is listed at 90,- 
000,000, but average daily attend- 
ance per theatre is 765 persons. 

These and many other facts make 
The Film Daily Year Book a cher- 
ished possession of every movie edi- 



Among extras there were 629 men, 
271 women and 41 children employed tor, exhibitor and distributor. 

Reprinted from New Brunswick, .V. /., Sunday Times, May 9, 1943. 



12 



M. P.. P. 13. A. 

2UW. 44TH ST 
N . V . L . = 



THE' 



k DAILY 



Monday, July 19, 1943 



UDT Experiment with Femme Personnel Clicking 



22 Women Employed Either 
As Managers or Assistants 
In Circuit's 18 Theaters 



By H. F. REVES 

FILM DAILY Staff Correspondent 

Detroit — Use of women as theater 
managers, a wartime experiment re- 
luctantly started a year or so back 
by some few exhibitors, today looks 
successful to the top executives of 
United Detroit Theaters, who have 
experimented more extensively with 
women than any other circuit or 
exhibitor. With a circuit of 18 
houses, the UDT group now has 22 
women in managerial posts — seven 
as full managers, the rest as assis- 
tants. 

Other circuit operators have ex- 
perimented briefly with women as 
managers, some have them as as- 
sistants, and, still others are reluc- 
tant to make the break. In nearly 
every circuit office, there are wo- 
men doing duties that men formerly 
performed, up to buying and booking 
pictures, supervising personnel, and/ 
the like. In Detroit, however, these 
have so far tended to remain iso- 
lated cases, and only UDT has done 
it as a consistent policy. One wo- 
man who was named assistant man- 
ager for a circuit, is now content- 
edly functioning as cashier at an- 
other house on the same circuit, and 
the organization is seeking new male 
managers. 

UDT Policy Cashes In 

A comparison of the UDT policy 
of planning for and training women 
managers with the usual haphazard 
appointment of a woman with some 
theater experience to the job indi- 
cates the reason for the outstanding 
difference. UDT's personnel policy 
for years has favored the enforce- 
ment of a uniform operating policy 
in house management, with due con- 
sideration for the local problems of 
each house. Capable employes tra- 
ditionally have risen in the ranks 
from usher up to manager, and man- 
agers and assistants have frequently 
rotated between houses to get var- 
iety of experience, working, as as- 
sistants, under trained managers who 
knew the ropes. 

The same careful planning and 
training was adopted for the girls, 
who were not thrust into a manag- 
erial job without adequate prepara- 
tion. UDT has girls in a large num- 
ber of its houses as usherettes, and 
chiefs of service, as well as cashiers 
in all houses, when the war started. 
Personnel chiefs began to pick out 
the likely looking prospects for 
training and advancement. Adver- 
tisements were used in the newspa- 



Who Said the Shortest Distance Between 

Two Points Was a Straight Line, Anyway? 

Who said the shortest distance between two points was a straight line? 

Murray Silverstone, 20th-Fox vice-prexy in charge of foreign distribution, 
wants to know, and here's why: 

Recently, Silverstone received a letter from Ernest Fredman, managing edi- 
tor of the Daily Film Renter, London, a friend of long standing, in which Fred- 
man said that he was uncertain as to the whereabouts of his son, Lt. Eric S. 
Fredman, BEF, on active service. 

Shortly thereafter came a letter from 20th-Fox's manager in Algiers re- 
porting a pic deal made with Lt. E. S. Fredman, Bureau of Physcological Warfare, 
attached to Allied Headquarters. 

And so to London from New York promptly went a cable informing the 
widely known British trade editor of his son's activities. 



Studios' Executive 
Position Excellent 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Major studios at pres- 
ent are not seriously worried over 
the inroads that are yet to be made 
by Selective Service into the ranks 
of executives, producers and depart- 
ment heads, a checkup discloses. 
Studio representatives point out that 
the greatest damage has already 
been done and that the bulk of pro- 
duction tops and key men consists 
of men over 38 years old. 

In addition to the fact that most 
of the responsible posts are held by 
men more than 38 years old, occupa- 
tional deferments granted by the 
War Manpower Commission in April 
resulted in several department heads 
being deferred for 12 months. How- 
ever, these deferments are subject 
to revision in October, but no drastic 
changes in the length of the defer- 
ments is anticipated. Most of the 
department heads who volunteered 
for the armed services, or who were 
inducted, were succeeded by their 
chief assistants. 

Losses in the ranks of producers, 
when they occur, are rapidly filled, 
with some of the studios promoting 
directors and writers to producer- 
ships. 



Economic Re-birth 
In East Texas Towns 



Dallas — Early fears both of ex- 
hibitors and exchangemen of a busi- 
ness collapse in the purely agricul- 
tural small towns of East Texas, 
expected to follow a draining off of 
farm personnel into military ser- 
vices and war-work, have been re- 
lieved from totally unexpected 
sources, trade contacts have defi- 
nitely established. 

As summarized by Clyde Houston, 
16-year M-G-M East Texas roadster, 
these sources are the increased in- 
comes on the farms, money sent 
home by war-workers, and the infil- 
tration of prosperity from national 
spending into remote places. Hous- 
ton says that this economic re-birth 
has sustained the box-office "take" 
and protected the revenues of the 
distributors. 

Patron types have changed. C. M. 
Cooper of Mart, finds faces never be- 
fore seen; more farm trade of more 
advanced years; town persons, not 
formerly regular attendants, and 
youths and children more liberally 
supplied with funds. This is con- 
firmed by Ed Dorbandt, Athens, and 
McLendon for his Tri-States circuit. 
A roll-call of East Texas exhibitors 
would show the same. 



The ... . 

FEMME TOUCH 



MRS. BERNICE COOCAN, Stanley, Baltimore, 
Md. 



Spain Stiffens Import Rales 

Designed to Halt Flood of Native Quickies 



Barcelona (By Air Mail) — The 
Spanish Government has changed 
the existing regulations whereby 
Spanish producers could import a 
certain number of foreign films for 
each picture they produce. This had 
led to the production of cheap and 
inferior Spanish features which were 



apparently made only to get an im- 
port permit 

Under the new regulations, all 
Spanish films will have to pass the 
approval of a new commission which 
will grant import permits only to 
those producers whose productions 
are regarded as artistically valuable. 



pers, indicating the possibilities of 
advancement toward managerial or 
other posts. The cream of the crop 
of ambitious girls was gleaned in 
this manner. 

It was nearly a year ago that the first full 
woman manager was appointed — Eleanor 
Stanton at the Bloomfield Theater, in Birm- 
ingham. She had the advantage of working 
in a neighborhood house a block away from 
one managed by the circuit's longest-estab- 



lished house manager, who was in a position 
to advise and render help. The experiment 
soon proved successful, as the many feminine 
appointments of today testify. 

Special Training Courses 
Meanwhile the regular training program 
was in operation. Not all candidates suc- 
ceeded, but those who did — and more are 
still going through the mill — found good posts 
awaiting them. The usual procedure has 
been to start the future managers as usher- 
ettes, advance them to cashiers, then to 



WAR SERVICE 

. . . on the Film Front 



Motion Picture Laboratory Techrr """"is' 
Union, Local 702, IATSE, at the i JA 
the month will launch a drive in the la-.- ri- 
tories for old clothes. The salvaged gar- 
ments will be donated to war agencies. 
The union has asked the co-operation of 
the employers in the drive. 
. . . _ V . . . — 

Chicago — Telenews theater in co-opera- 
tion with the U. S. quartermaster depart- 
ment, has installed a lobby display of the 
various packaged foods, used overseas by 
the armed forces. 

... — V ... — 

Little Rock, Ark.— Ed Rowley, Jr., local 
WAC Public Relations chairman and man- 
ager of the Robb and Rowley theaters, has 
instituted a series of "Saturday Morning 
Kiddie Matinees" for the collection of 
scrap. Matinees, which will continue "as 
long as an ounce of scrap metal remains in 
Little Rock," have brought in over 600 
lbs. of war-precious metals in the two per- 
formances already given. 



chief of service, and occasionally to a special 
post as secretary to a manager. Following 
this, they are given a course of training 
lasting six to 12 months. In this they are 
given training in every branch of theater 
operation, including publicity and advertis- 
ing, as well as daily routine operation and 
"housekeeping problems." 

UDT executives are enthusiastic over the 
"consistently satisfactory performance of the 
ladies who have followed the regular course 
of training," as one put it. Conscientious- 
ness, a sense of responsibility, and the knowl- 
edge that they must prove their ability to 
hold posts for two reasons — to prove the 
ability of their sex, and to meet male compe- 
tition when the war is over — are important 
factors in their satisfactory work. 
Maintain Neatness, Order 

Neatness of houses is one factor UDT ha> 
always stressed, and the standards of theii 
houses, observed by personal inspection, ha> 
not deteriorated in recent month, as it has in 
many theaters because of disorderly patrons 
and shortage of help — despite the obviou- 
scareity of replacements of many items. The 
housewifely instincts of the women manag- 
ers and assistants are evidently to be credi 
ted in large part with this desirable condi 
tion. 

Maintaining order in the average house i- 
something that the girls have been able ti 
do remarkably well, despite the exceptiona 
problems that Detroit, with its recent his- 
tory of violence, poses. Only special factoi 
here appears to be that the average would 
be disturber doesn't like to start a rea 
fight with a girl, when he knows that hi>i 
companions will be ashamed to back him ur 
— a sort of buried chivalry. General agree 
ment, however, is that a suitable male au- 
thority in reserve, possibly in the form of thel 
police, is desirable whenever real troubl 
seems likely to develop. 



TO THE COLORS! 



* PROMOTED * 

TOM CILLIAM, )R., son of the 20th-Fox branch 
manager, Chicago, to 1st lieutenant. 

* ARMY • 

ADOLPH J. SILVERSTEIN, 20+h-Fox home office 
exploitation department. 

* WAC* 

MRS. BARNEY OLDFIELD, former FILM DAILY 
correspondent, Lincoln, Neb. 



I 



FILE COPT 
00 NOT BEMO^ 




VOL >4, NO. 13 



NEW YORK. TUESDAY. JULY 20, 1943 



TEN CENTS 



3 CRESCENT COURSES FOR HIGHEST COURT 

Troops in Hawaiian Area Turn Against War Pix 



Reeling 'Round - - 
WASHINGTON 



=By ANDREW H. OLDER; 



—WASHINGTON 
A LTHOUGH he's been moving cautiously 
'* in everything he's done so far, there's 
io reason to believe that Tom Clark will 
>e a weaker anti-trust chief than was Thur- 
nan Arnold. ... He impresses as a smooth, 
tough — and darned decent — gent with a lot 
)f charm, a sense of fairness and a knowl- 
edge of human nature. . . . What he's ga- 
ng to decide to do in November regarding 
he New York consent decree, he hasn't 
Jecided yet. . . . We're fairly certain no 
ecommendation has come to him from Bob 
Wright. We do feel quite certain, how- 
;ver, that he'll conscientiously determine 
what action to follow strictly on the basis 
)f the facts put before him. . . . It's a safe 
>et that he won't be turned aside from what- 
ever course he decides to pursue simply be- 
cause there's a war on, or because of pres- 
sure from others here in Washington. . . . 
Our guess is that the industry will get to 
mow Clark very well — and that he will 
jnjoy the respect of all those he comes in 
:ontact with, whether on opposite sides 
>r the same side of the fence. 

• • 

I OWELL MELLETT really did do a ter- 
■"" rific job for OWI, when you consider 
ill the various phases of the work carried 
in by his office. Let's just mention the 50- 
idd war shorts for which a major share 
if the responsibility goes to him, his liaison 
nd research work for the studios, his im- 
iressive system for non-theatrical showings, 
is invaluable aid to the newsreels. . . . 
"hen remember that the entire operation 
|'f the bureau was carried on for no more 
han the budget for one good Class A fea- 
ure. . . . Elmer Davis has made it plain 
n several occasions that he is no enthus- 
iastic friend of Hollywood — for instance, in I 
radio address he delivered last Wednesday 1 
- e referred to all the nation's great in- 
srmation media. He mentioned every im- 
ortant media but motion pictures. That 
rror may have been a simple one of omis- 
ion, but at any rate it certainly does in- 
icate how slight is Davis' regard for the 
■dustry. 

• • 

THE disagreements between Mellett and 
Davis are quite complex. Underlying 
ie whole thing was a personality clash, 
ut the various specific instances which 
fought these differences to the fore were 
{Continued on Page 2) 



Soldiers Expressing Defi- 
nite Preference for Musi- 
cals, Comedies, Whodunits 



By EILEEN O'BRIEN 
FILM DAILY Staff Correspondent 

Honolulu, Hawaii (By Air Mail, 
Passed by Censor) — Soldiers in the 
Hawaiian area are getting tired of 
"war" pictures and express a defi- 
nite preference for musicals, com- 
edies and good mysteries. 

This trend has been observed by 
Capt. Donald W. LeGoullon and his 
staff who handle the motion picture 

(Continued on Page 3) 



HOLD LUCAS 
RITES TODAY 

Georgia Circuit Operator Was 
Paramount Associate 



Visual Education 
Field Attracts PRC 



Through the purchase of a major- 
ity stock control of Official Films, 
Inc., PRC is planning a post-war 
program of visual education films 
for universities, colleges and schools, 
it was announced yesterday by 0. 
Henry Briggs, PRC president. 

Official Films, Inc., is one of the 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Court Refuses to Quash 
Film Extortion Charges 

The six alleged Chicago gangsters 
charged with extorting more than 
$1,000,000 from film companies will 
have to stand trial in New York, ac- 
cording to a ruling made yesterday 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Atlanta — Funeral services will be 
held this afternoon for Arthur Lu- 
cas, 61, Paramount partner and di- 
recting head of the Lucas & Jenkins 
organization, who died here Satur- 
day. Services will be at the All 
Saints Episcopal Church and burial 
in the West View Cemetery. 

Active pallbearers will be Harben 
Daniel, Savannah; William J. Vereen, 
Moultrie; I. L. Shields; Columbus; 
E. E. Whitaker, Camp Ellis, 111.; 
R. B. Wilby, William K. Jenkins, Roy 
M. Avey and T. H. Reed, Atlanta. 
Honorary pallbearers will be Rus- 
sell H. Leonard, Boston; Senators 
Walter F. George and Richard B. 

(Continued on Page 6) 

Bank of America 
Financing for PA 

Newly formed Producing Artists, 
Inc., is slated to deliver six pictures 
for United Artists' 1943-44 program 
and will be the first film company 
to operate on a profit-sharing basis 
with its players, directors and writ- 
ers, according to Arthur Lyons, vice- 
president. New enterprise was 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Can Affirm Decision, 
Order Correction or Direct 
More Hearings by Davies 



By P. R. RUSSELL 

FILM DAILY Staff Correspondent 
Nashville, Tenn. — Although the 
appeal of the Crescent case to the 
Supreme Court, to be heard Aug. 25, 
was made by Assistant Attorney 
General Tom C. Clark and Special 
Assistant Robert L. Wright for the 
specific purpose of correcting the 
decree of Federal Judge Elmer D. 
Davies to make it mandatory for 
(Continued on Page 7) 



Ask SO SO Terms For "Army 

Extended Time Required; Duals Banned 



fjj 



Loew's Ohio, Cleveland 
Reopening After 5 Years 

Cleveland — Loew's Ohio, built in 
1921 for legit., converted into a 
deluxe night club in 1935 and closed 
ever since 1938 is now undergoing 
extensive repairs in anticipation of 
a Sept. 1 opening. J. R. Vogel, Loew 
official in town last week, stated 
that the Ohio will be operated as a 
straight first-run. "For Whom the 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Selling terms for Warners' film 
version of Irving Berlin's "This is 
the Army" call for a straight 50-50 
split between the exhibitor and the 
distributor, with the latter's pro- 
ceeds going to Army Emergency 
Relief. Contracts already closed 
with exhibs. reveal that double-fea- 
turing is taboo, likewise previews 
and free lists, and extended time 
is called for. 

On the special advanced-price pre- 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Long "Aleutians" 
Version Okayed 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAU.Y 

Washington — Palmer Hoyt, OWI 
domestic director, has served notice 
that OWI will no longer insist upon 
exercising its authority to clear films 
of other Government agencies for 
release to the public. Fully aware 
of the importance of his decision, 

(Continued on Page 6) 

SMPE Tech. Conference 
Set for Hollywood Oct. 18 

Society of Motion Picture Engi- 
neers will hold its 54th Semi-Annual 
Technical Conference in the Holly- 
wood-Roosevelt Hotel, Hollywood, 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Snap Up Chase Bank's 
20th-Fox Preferred 

Chase National Bank's preferred 
stock holdings in 20th Century-Fox 
were snapped up in a hurry after be- 
ing offered by an underwriting group 
headed by Lehman Bros, and Blyth & 
Co., Inc. The stock was over-sub- 
scribed and the books closed shortly 
after going on the market yesterday. 
Chase had 665,715 shares of $1.50 no 
par convertible cumulative stock, 
representing 73 per cent of the 905,- 
081 shares outstanding on July 13. 
They were offered at $33.50 per 
share. 



WW 

DAILY 



Tuesday, July 20, 1943 




Vol. 84, No. 13 Tues., July 20, 1943 10 Cents 



JOHN W. ALICOATE 


: : : Publisher 


DONALD M. MERSEREAU 


General Manager 


CHESTER B. BAHN : 


: : : : 'Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address: 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON — Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco- Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



FINANCIAL 



(Monday, July 19) 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 



High Low 

163,4 163,4 



183/4 

39'/ 4 
2% 

163/ 4 



21% 
63 1/4 
281/z 

9'/2 



Close 

163/4 — 
183/4 — 
391/4 — 

2% . 

163/4 



21% — 

631/4 — 

28% _ 

91/2 — 



Am. Seat 

Col. Picts. vtc. (2i/ 2 %) 183,4 
Columbia Picts. pfd.. 40 

Con. Fm. Ind 2% 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd... 16% 

East. Kodak I66V2 I66I/4 166% + 

do pfd 180 180 180 

Cen. Prec. Eq 22 

Loew's, Inc 63% 

Paramount 28% 

RKO 934 

RKO $6 pfd 

20th Century-Fox . . 23% 23% 23% — 
20th Century-Fox pfd. 333/ 4 33% 33% — 

Univ. Pict. pfd 

Warner Bros 15% 1514 15!/ 4 . 

do pfd 

8913-32 8913-32 89 13-32 . 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Para. B'way 3s55 

Para. Picts. deb. 4s56 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Monogram Picts 3% 

RKO war 1% 

Sonotone Corp 3% 

Technicolor 15% 

Trans-Lux 3% 

Universal Pictures vtc. I81/2 



Net 
Chg. 

1/4 

1/4 

3 /4 



31/7 


3% 


1% 


1% 


33/4 


3% 


15% 


15 V? 


31/4 


3i/4 


18% 


18% 



+ 



14 



MANPOWER 

YES, WE BELIEVE WE CAN 
SUPPLY GRADED MANPOWER 
TO FILL ANY VACANCY IN 
YOUR ORGANIZATION. 

CALL— 

FRANK McGRANN 

POSITION SECURING BUREAU, IN.C 

(Agency) 
331 Madison Ave. (43rd St.), New York 

MUrray hill 2-6494 



Reeling 'Round' - 
WASHINGTON 



(Continued from Page 1) 

invariably instances where Mellett was 
striving to carry the ball for the industry, 
while Davis usually showed himself unim- 
pressed by industry representations. . . Cer- 
tainly he was not greatly impressed by the 
importance of the job Mellett did, judging 
from his failure to put up any sort of a bat- 
tle during the budget hearings to retain the 
Mellett bureau despite united industry sup- 
port for it. . . . Palmer Hoyt, new domestic 
director, is believed somewhat more sympa- 
thetic. Although no one can tell how a 
former drama critic feels about Hollywood, 
Hoyt's regard for the industry may prove to 
be the key to future relations between 
Hollywood and OWI. 

• • 

A ND here's a "grapevine" tip: Keep a 
■** box of aspirin handy. The motion pic- 
ture industry, along with several others, 
may be in for quite a headache this week. 



Sicilian Invasion Film 
To be Ready Shortly 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Film of the invasion 
of Sicily will be available to the 
War Department within a short 
time," the Special Activities Branch, 
Office of the Chief Signal Officer, 
disclosed yesterday. 

The Signal Corps Army Pictorial 
Service has a special production 
crew for handling motion picture 
film in operation in North Africa. 
Staff lays out the continuity, iden- 
tifies the film and puts background 
material on film to be used in con- 
junction with battle shots. 

Capt. Reynolds A. Scott, a Signal 
Corps motion picture photographer 
recently was awarded the Air Medal 
for making 9 operational flights over 
Kiska, is one of the men in North 
Africa. Capt. Scott is one of the 
three Signal Corps cameramen who 
made the action picture "Report 
From the Aleutians," about to be 
released to the American public. 



Variety Club Fetes 
Samson in Buffalo 



Buffalo— Variety Club's testimon- 
ial dinner for .Sydney Samson, who 
moves from the Buffalo branch man- 
agership to become general manager 
for Canada of 20th-Fox, drew more 
than 200 persons last night. E. K. 
(Ted) O'Shea and Dave Miller di- 
vided the toastmaster's assignment. 

Chairman Phil Fox read a tele- 
gram from Tom Connors, 20th-Fox 
sales vice-prexy, expressing his re- 
gret at inability to attend and laud- 
ing both Samson and his Buffalo 
successor, Ira Cohn. 



Five Femmes on M. H. Staff 

Radio City Music Hall, for the 
first time in its history, has added 
five girls to its service staff, it was 
announced yesterday by Managing 
Director Gus S. Eyssell. Step was 
necessitated because more than 11 
former doormen and ushers are now 
with the armed forces. 



Rochester Rotarians 
To Hear Coe Aug. 3 

Rochester — Charles Francis "Sock- 
er" Coe, vice-president and general 
counsel of MPPDA, will be here Tues- 
day, Aug. 3, 
to address the 
Rotary Club, 
city's leading 
civic organi- 
zation, it has 
been a n - 
nounced. 

Coe, w h o | 
will spend the 
day here, will 
be entertained 
by the local 
WAC and 
local theater 
managers, and 
will probably 
pay a visit to "SOCKER" COE 
Eastman Kodak Co. 

Preston "Duke" Hickey, field 
rep. of the Hays office, was here 
making arrangements for Coe's ap- 
pearance at the club. 




M-G-M Sets Trade Shows 
For Seven New Pictures 



Tradeshows for seven new pic- 
tures were announced yesterday by 
M-G-M. "Salute to the Marines" 
and "I Dood It!" will be shown in 
exchange centers on July 27, except 
in Albany where it will be screened 
July 26 and in Memphis on July 31. 
"Best Foot Forward" and "Young 
Ideas" will be shown July 29 ex- 
cept in Albany and Memphis where 
it will be screened on Aug. 2. "Tartu" 
and "Girl Crazy" will be screened 
Aug. 2-3 except in Albany where 
they are scheduled to be shown Aug. 
9. "The Man From Down Under" 
will be shown Aug. 3 and 5 except 
in Memphis and Albany where they 
may be seen Aug. 7 and Aug. 10, re- 
spectively. 



British Crown Film Unit 
N. Y.-Bound for Shooting 

A crew of the Crown Film Unit, 
which produces war film for the 
British Ministry of Information, is 
headed for New York, where it will 
film the second half of a Technicolor 
production called "Western Ap- 
proaches," which tells the story of 
Atlantic convoys and their naval and 
aerial escorts. 

Among those in the party are Pat 
Jackson, director, and Dora Wright, 
production manager. Also in the 
group are two American sound tech- 
nicians of the U. S. Civilian Techni- 
cal Corps assigned to the Crown 
Film Unit. 



Jackson Park Trust Suit 
To Go to Trial on Nov. 1 



Chicago — Jackson Park theater 
anti-trust case against Balaban & 
Katz and majors, has been set for 
Nov. 1 trial in Federal Judge Mich- 
ael Igoe's court. 



COMinC and GOMG 



JACK L. WARNER arrived from the Coast yes- 
terday. 

ED PESKAY blew into town from Hollywood 
yesterday. 

ROBERT COLDSTEIN of the New York Talent 
Department of 20th-Fox, has returned to New 
York after three weeks at the West Co- A studios. 

SPYROS SKOURAS, head of 20th' , *f' % leaves 
today for the studio for conferences *ifli Joseph 
M. Schenck and Darryl F. Zanuck. 

C. J. "PAT" SCOLLARD is in Washington to- 
day. 

DAVE WALLENSTEIN, B & K district man- 
ager, is spending his vacation at Cedar Lake, 
Wis. 

AL RAYMER, Indiana-Illinois circuit booking 
manager, and his family, are at Michigan City 
on vacation. 

ARTHUR S. LYONS, vice-president of Pro- 
ducing Artists, Inc., was among Coast arrivals 
yesterday. 

IRVING GREENFIELD, assistant to Leopold 
Friedman, Loew's general counsel, is vacationing 
at Lake George. 

MICHAEL TODD and HERBERT FIELDS have 
gone to Mexico City to confer with Cole Porter 
on the Broadway producer's next musical pre- 
senattion. 

STEVE EDWARDS. Republic special rep. in 
Chicago, goes to Milwaukee this week for the 
p. a. of Roy Rogers at the Wisconsin theater. 

MRS. TOM GILLIAM, wife of 20th-Fox's 

Chicago manager, and her son, JIMMY, have 

gone to Los Angeles for a month's visit with 

Mrs. R. C. Seery. 

M. M. RUBENS of the Great States circuit, 
this week returns to Chicago from an inspection 
tour. 

MERVIN HOUSER of the Paramount studio 
publicity department has returned to the Coast. 

BEN SHLYEN and MRS. SHLYEN are vaca- 
tioning in New York. 



Arthur Byron Funeral 
Rites Held on Coast 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Los Angeles — Last rites for Ar- 
thur Byron, one-time president of 
Actors Equity, were held yesterday 
in the Wee Kirk o' the Heather in 
Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glen 
dale, with cremation following. The 
ashes are being sent to the actor's 
old home in Maine for burial. 

Byron, 71, died on Friday of a 
heart ailment from which he had 
long been suffering. 



Columbia to Pay 68%c 

Columbia Pictures has declared a 
quarterly dividend of $.68% pel 
share on the $2.75 convertible pre- 
ferred stock, payable Aug. 16 to 
holders of record Aug. 2. 




Maurice Marks 
Katharine Stevens Muriel Evans 



Tuesday, July 20, 1943 



W"S? 



Hawaiian Troops 
Turn Against War Pix 



{Continued from Page 1) 

section of the Special Service Di- 
vision of the Hawaiian Service of 
Supply. 

The section provides movies for 
all f^r-- Hawaiian islands and some 
of i )34outlying Pacific bases and 
therefore is an accurate measure of 
"GI" opinion. 

The most popular pictures in re- 
cent months, based on the requests 
for bookings and audience reaction 
observed by the staff are as fol- 
lows: 

"Road to Morocco," "Pride of the 
Yankees," "Mrs. Miniver," "Casa- 
blanca," "Yankee Doodle Dandy," 
"The Hard Way," "Commandos 
Strike at Dawn," "You Were Never 
Lovelier and "Somewhere I'll Find 
You." 

The Hawaiian premiere of "Stage 
i Door Canteen" was held in McKin- 
ley High School auditorium and the 
packed G.I. house applauded vigor- 
' ously throughout. The various Army 
units in the vicinity of the school 
I were alloted a limited number of 
' tickets. Areas near the school were 
i selected, because of the 10 p.m. cur- 
few which requires that all persona, 
except those on official business, be 
off the streets at tbat hour. 

Following the original showing, 
"Canteen" made a tour of the ma- 
jor echelons, which took about a 
L week, and then went on tour of the 
outside islands. This will take 
about a month, after which it will 
be placed on the general circuit of 
Army posts and outposts on the is- 
land of Oahu. 




J SMPE Tech. Conference 

Set for Hollywood Oct. 18 



(Continued from Page 1) 

f Oct. 18-22, inclusive, it is announced 
by the Board of Governors. 

Papers Committee chairman will 
be Dr. C. R. Daily, and personnel 

• of this committee and others will be 
announced shortly. Those intend- 
ing to submit papers for the Con- 
ference should communicate as early 
as possible with Dr. Daily, at Para- 

I mount Pictures, Inc., 5451 Marathon 

I St., Hollywood, Calif. 



WEDDING BELLS 



Cleveland — Announcement is made 
of the engagement of Tom Mooney, 
son of Milton A. Mooney of Co-op- 
erative Theaters of Ohio and Mrs. 
Mooney, to Marguerite Plunkett of 
this city. They plan to be married 
soon after Tom gets his pilot's 
wings next month in Miami, Fla. 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Dorothy McGuire and 
John Swope were married Sunday. 



T T T 

Old Shots and New Tahes: 

• • • RIGHT now, many oi our khaki and blueiacketed lads of 

filmdom are shooting laps in the far-flung Pacific In effect, it is, 

among other advantages, taking revenge for the apparently forgotten 

Tragedy of Francis Boggs If the current generation of celluloid 

gents doesn't clearly remember what happened to Mister Boggs, Phil M. 
can shed some light on the affair, thanks to a letter received yesterday 

from Michael Robach, veteran pic figure and historian The Robach 

missive is highly interesting in contents as well as its physical appear- 
ance, penned as it is in variegated shades of ink which lend it an atmos- 
phere of Technicolor in the best Kalmus manner Mike, as Mister 

Robach is known to his intimates, declares that picture production in 
California was inaugurated by Francis Boggs and Thomas A. Persons 

for the Selig Polyscope Co., of Chicago "I find," he says "in the 

Moving Picture World, Volume 10, Nov. 11, 1911, page 455, that Boggs 
was shot through the heart by an 'insane' Japanese, while Col. W. N. 
Selig was only wounded by same, and was expected out of the hospital 
in a few days" Then Robach adds: "A later news item, not re- 
corded in my notes on the subject, was, as I remember, 'Col. Selig made 
a trip to the Coast from Chicago to attend trial as witness. The Jap got a 
life sentence at Alcatraz' " 

t y t 

• • • THIS-A AND THAT-A: Br'r Nunnally Johnson is 

buckling down to do a dramatization of Erskine Caldwell's book, 

'Georgia Boy," at the behest of Jed Harris. ... # Mrs. B. V . Sturdi- 
vant, wife of the supervisor of Fox West Coast Theaters of Northern 
California, has moved from Los Angeles to San Francisco to be with her 
husband. ... # George (Paramount Shorts) Harvey is loyal to his 
field,— wearing shorts while vacationing down Shelter Island Heights 
way, famed stamping ground of E. C. (Ascap) Mills. ... • Sam Cum- 
mins' Pix Theater in Washington, D. C, is, he pens, going great guns 
with a special Summer program christened Frank Capra's Cavalcade of 

Films Showing comprises, each pic running for a full week, "Mr. 

Deeds Goes to Town," "Lady for a Day," "It Happened One Night," 
"Lost Horizon," "Broadway Bill," "Mr. Smith Goes to Washintgon," 

and "Y.ou Can't Take It With You" Cavalcade commenced June 

30 and winds up Aug. 11 

T T T 

• • • OVER at epicurean "21" last evening, 20th-Fox hosted a 
dinner attended by Guest of Honor Charles Coburn and the Trade Press 

Immediately thereafter, all hands were swiftly transported to the 

RKO 23rd Street Theater for a special sneak preview of Ernst Libitsch's 

new, socko, and delightful comedy, "Heaven Can Wait" Dear 

Friend Exhib., — here's a HONEY Among those present at repast and 

showings were, from 20th-Fox, Sam Shain, Jack Goldstein, Chccrles 
Schlaifer, Roger Ferri and Mrs. Ferri, Dave Bader, and, from the Pic 
Fourth Estate, Don M. Mersereau, Chester B. Bahn, Charles "Chick" Lewis, 
Ben and Mrs. Shlyen, Bill Formby, Jimmy Cunningham, Frank Leyen- 
decker, Chet Friedman, R. W. Barremore, Mel Konecoff, Al Picoult, Lou 
Pelegrine, Tom Kennedy, Jim Ivers, Jeannette Samuelson, John Stewart, 
Wanda Marvin, Jack Harrison, Mori Krushen, Floyd Stone, Morris (Metro- 
politan Photo Service) Leftoff, plus Alton (World Telegram) Cook 

Dinner was superb: Salmon; Chicken whisked up in chafing dish with 
cream and sherry; Watercress Salad; and for dessert. Blueberry Pie, Tom 
Connors, Bill Kupper; and Demi-Tasse 

T T T 

• • • AVENGE PEARL HARBOR! 



"This is the Army" 
Sold on 50% Terms 



(Continued from Page 1) 

mieres, exhib. 's share is to be 30 per 
cent, except in cases where the house 
can be prevailed upon to give more 
or all to Army Relief. Warner sales 
department is pointing out that, at 
the advanced prices and with the 
assured SRO on the opening night, 
exhibs. stand to get more on their 
30 per cent than they would make 
on a regular picture with 70 per 
cent as their share. 

Pete J. Wood, ITO of Ohio secre- 
tary, in his latest bulleting to mem- 
bers, states the Warner terms for 
"Army" are 50 per cent up to the 
"Sergeant York" gross, after which 
different conditions apply. This 
could not be verified at the Warner 
home office yesterday, General Sales 
Manager Ben Kalmenson and other 
sales officials not having returned 
yet from the San Francisco regional 
meeting. 

Charles Einfeld, Warners' direc- 
tor of advertising and publicity, fol- 
lowing conferences in New York 
with Army Emergency Relief offic- 
ials, leaves tomorrow for Chicago 
for talks with Army Relief heads 
in that area concerning "Army's" 
Midwest premieres. 

Meanwhile, in the first several 
hundred playdates set for the pic- 
ture the Warner sales department 
is understood to have had almost 
100 per cent success in booking ex- 
tended time for the engagement. 
Aim is to obtain the longest possible 
runs with a view of realizing maxi- 
mum proceeds for Army Relief. 



Largest B'dway Signs 
Leased by WB for "Army" 

Broadway's two largest signs, the 
world-famous display at the north 
end of Longacre Square and the 
block-long Wrigley sign across the 
street from the Hotel Astor, have 
been leased for the world premiere 
engagement of Irving Berlin's "This 
is the Army," produced by Warners 
for Army Emergency Relief, it was 
stated yesterday by Mort Blumen- 
stock, in charge of Warner Adver- 
tising and publicity in the East. 



New Civic Operating Co. 

Albany — Charter papers have been 
issued to 572 South Salina Corp., 
Syracuse, to conduct theater biz, 
concern having filed incorporation 
papers here with the Secretary of 
State's office. Subscribers of record 
are George E. Smith, V. S. Matthews 
and Mary A. Warrian, Syracuse. 
Company will operate the Civic. 



STORKS 



Cleveland — It's a second daughter 
for Tony Stern, Warner theater head 
booker and Mrs. Stern. She has 
been named Linda Joy. 







? *v 



** 



St 



*7" 



'^^OBBAT.CREAT.G***' 







CHARLES COBURN 



PETER LORRE • BRENDA MA 
DAME MAY WHITTY • Dire« 



Uep Selling The "Shangri-La" Stamp Drivel 



RFECTLY PORTRAYING THE PERFECT STORY FOR THEM 




AND A SENSATIOf 
PERFORMANCE 
THE SENSATION/ 







7 **s / 



IE MOST UNUSUAL LOVE STORY IN YEARS AND YEARS 









EDMUND GOULDING 







Screen Ploy by Kothryn Scolo • From the Novel and Ploy by 
Moraoret Kennedy and Basil Deon> Music by Erich Wolfgang Korngold 



w 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 20, 1943 f. 



Long "Aleutians" 
Version Okayed 



(.Continued from Page 1) 

Hoyt yielded to Army pressure and 
ok'd public showing for the 50-min- 
ute version of the Army's "Report 
From the Aleutians." 

A two-reel version was available 
and Hoyt had decided earlier last 
week to recommend that both ver- 
sions be offered WAC. It was un- 
derstood vthen that he would insist 
both be made available by the Army, 
Saturday, however, he decided final- 
ly, in the, face of Army refusal to 
offer the fehort version, to approve 
the longer film, contenting himself 
with a letter recommending that the 
Army reconsider and offer the two- 
reeler. He pointed out that the lat- 
ter would be seen by many more peo- 
ple and told The Film Daily that 
he will "continue to press for" re- 
lease of the short version. 



Loew's Ohio, Cleveland 
Reopening After 5 Years 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Bell Tolls" will be the opening at- 
traction and will be shown under a 
road-show policy. 



Films Distributors Takes 
Council on Books Shorts 



Films Distributors Corp. will re- 
lease the series of shorts produced 
by the Council on Books in Wartime 
under an arrangement with News- 
reel Distributors, Inc. First sub- 
ject, based on John Hershey's "Into 
the Valley," has been completed and 
the second will be based on Eve 
Curie's "Journey Among Warriers." 



Buys Clay, Ky.. Theater 

Cloverport, Ky. — E. J. Moskowitz, 
operating the Rio Theater here, has 
acquired the State Theater, Clay, 
Ky., from J. M. Blue. 



Cameramen Teaching 
Combat Photography 

West Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Alvin Wyckoff, vet- 
eran cinematographer, has been in- 
structing eight classes for the Signal 
Corps in Combat Photography, for 
the past year. This is in conjunction 
with John Arnold of M-G-M, who had 
five classes; C. Roy Hunter of Para- 
mount, one class; Emil Oster of Co- 
lumbia, one class; and, Charles 
Clarke of 20th Century-Fox, one 
class. This was arranged by Wil- 
liam F. Kelly and M. MacFarland 
of the Academy of Motion Picture 
Arts and Sciences Research Council, 
and Fred Jackman, Sr., of the Amer- 
ican Society of Cinematographers. 
Wyckoff is now instructing 31 men 
who are with the Photographic Sec- 
tion of the U. S. Marine Corps. 



reviews of new mms 



"Silver Spurs" 

with Roy Rogers 

Republic 68 Mins. 

THIS ADDS ANOTHER EXCELLENT 

WESTERN TO LIST OF ROGERS VEHICLES; 

ACTING, STORY, PHOTOGRAPHY ACES. 

Roy Rogers continues his upward march 
in "Silver Spurs," a western that will stir 
the enthusiasm of his fans no end. Republic 
has done all within its power to supply its 
western ace with a vehicle guaranteed to 
advance his interests. The film possesses 
class and smartness, thanks coniderably to 
the production accorded it by Associate 
Producer Harry Grey. Any w^y one looks at 
it this is ace entertainment' with loads of 
action and excitement. 

Music and humor have been nicely 
blended into the story, which contains some 
excellent material and surprisingly good 
dialogue, for both of which much credit is 
due John K. Butler and J. Benton Cheney, 
who did the screenplay, and a darn good 
one, too. Smiley Burnette handles the 
comedy assignment beautifully. Rogers gets 
topnotch assistance from Bob Nolan and the 
Sons of the Pioneers in making the produc- 
tion musically attractive. The musical score 
contains six songs — "Jubilation Jamboree," 
"Back in Your Own Back Yard," "Hi Ways 
are Happy Ways," "Springtime in the 
Rockies," "Tumbling Tumbleweeds" and 
"Horses and Women." 

In "Silver Spurs" Rogers and the Sons 
of the Pioneers are pitted against a bunch 
of buddies headed by John Carradine, who 
plays the owner of a swanky bistro who has 
an eye on the ranch belonging to Jerome 
Cowan, a rich playboy whose chief interest 
is booze. Carradine inveigles Cowan into 
getting married with the idea of bumping 
him off and seizing the ranch from the 
widow. While Cowan is disposed of, the 
plot backfires through the courageous work 
of Rogers and his pals in exposing Carradine 
and bringing about his undoing. 

The cast is first-rate. Rogers is fine 
whether in action or in the throes of a song. 
Phyllis Brooks, a newspaper woman, is the 
wife of Cowan, whom she is tricked into 
marrying by her boss in an effort to get the 
truth. Rogers, Miss Brooks, Carradine and 
Burnette have able assistance from Joyce 
Compton, Dick Wessel and several others. 

The direction of Joseph Kane keeps the 
film always interesting. Reggie Lanning has 
provided some superb camera work. 

CAST: Roy Rogers, Smiley Burnette, John 
Carradine, Phyllis Brooks, Jerome Cowan, 
Joyce Compton, Dick Wessel, Hal Taliaferro, 
Forrest Taylor, Charles Wilson, Byron Foul- 
ger, Bob Nolan and Sons of the Pioneers. 

CREDITS: Associate Producer, Harry 
Grey; Director, Joseph Kane; Screenplay, 
John K. Butler, J. Benton Cheney; Camera- 
man, Reggie Lanning; Film Editor, Tony 
Martinelli; Sound, Tom Carman; Art Direc- 
tor, Russell Kimball; Set Decorator, Otto 
Siegel; Musical Director, Morton Scott. 

DIRECTION, Good. PHOTOGRAPHY, 
Splendid. 



Nazis Holding Sergt. Bevan 

Springfield, Mass. — Staff Sergt. 
Donald J. Bevan, formerly of the 
Paramount theater staff and nephew 
of Harry Smith, general manager of 
the Western Massachusetts Theaters, 
Inc., has been officially listed by the 
war department as a prisoner of 
war of the Germans. 



"The Falcon in 
Danger" 

with Tom Conway 
RKO 73 Mins. 

LATEST OF SERIES IS ROUTINE MELO- 
DRAMA OF FAIR MERIT THAT OWES 
PLENTY TO CONWAY. 

The latest Falcon film, like the several 
predecessors in the series in which he has 
appeared since his brother, George Sanders, 
stepped out of the character, owes prac- 
tically everything to the personality of Tom 
Conway, whose nonchalance and easy-go- 
ing manner give the production a breezy 
quality that makes one forget the artificial- 
ity and commonplaceness of the story. In 
addition to Conway the film's asset column 
contains a fair amount of suspense and 
considerable movement. 

The Falcon's newest assignment involves 
an airplane mystery in which the principals 
are a millionaire and his secretary. A fortune 
in securities is missing and the question 
is who took them. The Falcon tries in- 
numerable leads out of which he makes a 
case against the millionaire, whose motive 
for killing his secretary (a male, by the 
way) was to get his hands on the securities. 
Any number of persons fall under suspicion, 
including the Falcon himself, before the 
case is solved. 

The best of Conway's fellow players is 
Amelita Ward, who serves as the Falcon's 
latest romantic interest. At the close of the 
film Conway is relieved to be rid of her. 
Some of the others are Jean Brooks, Elaine 
Shepard, Cliff Clark, Ed Gargan, Clarence 
Kolb, Felix Basch. 

Maurice Geraghty has the producer credit. 
William Clemens' direction keeps the pace 
fast. The screenplay, a routine job, was 
turned out by Fred Niblo, Jr., and Craig 
Rice. 

CAST: Tom Conway, Jean Brooks, Elaine 
Shepard, Amelita Ward, Cliff Clark, Ed 
Gargan, Clarence Kolb, Felix Basch, Richard 
Davies, Richard Martin, Erford Gage, Eddie 
Dunn. 

CREDITS: Producer, Maurice Geraghty; 
Director, William Clemens; Screenplay, Fred 
Niblo, Jr., Craig Rice; Based on characters 
created by Michael Arlen; Cameraman, 
Frank Redman; Musical Score, Roy Webb; 
Musical Director, C. Bakaleinidoff ; Art Di- 
rectors, Albert S. D'Agostino, Walter E. 
Keller; Set Decorators, Darrell Silvera, Har- 
ley Miller; Sound, Jean L. Speak; Film Edi- 
tor, George Crone. 

DIRECTION, Okay. PHOTOGRAPHY, 
Good. 



Find Theaters Already 
Observing Dimout Code 

New Haven — The State Police and 
Fire Marshal called a special meet- 
ing of exhibitors here for the pur- 
pose of explaining the final dimout 
and blackout regulations, which will 
be printed and distributed within the 
next few weeks. It was reported 
that theaters were already following 
substantially all the regulations pre- 
sented, and no further suggestions 
on additions or changes were made. 

Ray Murray Leaves Metro 

Resignation of Ray Murray of 



Hold Lucas 
Funeral Today 



(Continued from Pane 1) 

Russell; Congressman Eugene Cox; 
L. W. Robert, Jr., Washington and 
Atlanta; Ralph Smith, Elmer Oliver •; 
and Judge 0. Max Gardner, Gardner 
Wash.; Leonard Goldens/g ]^i Leon je 
Netter, Austin Keough, %&/ Con- " 
nors, Niles Trammell, Claude Lee 
and James A. Farley, New York; B 
B. Grossett, Charlotte^ E. W. Cub- 
hedge, Savannah; Harry Demuth 
Jacksonville, and Homer Edenfield 
Grover Parsons, Charles E. Kess- 
nich, James H. Butner, Harry G 
Thornton, Harry Ballance, Roberl 
Woodruff, Macon Martin, James D 
Robinson, W. S. Kirkpatrick anc 
John A. Briceall, Atlanta. 

Starting with Miles Bros., a filir. 
renting agency in New York in 1907 
Lucas became a successful exhibitoi 
and distributor. In 1921, he opened 
the Lucas Theater in Savannah, one 
of the first theaters in the South tc 
be air-conditioned and the first tc 
serve as a community center foi 
civic groups. Two years later he 
joined with William K. Jenkins ir 
the formation of the present circuil 
which includes more than 50 the 
aters in Georgia. With Jenkins he 
also operated radio stations in Aug- 
usta, Savannah and Brunswick. 

Lucas was active in politics bu 
never held an elected office. He was 
former vice-chairman of the Fed 
eral Public Works Administratior 
and was chairman of the State Wai 
Savings Staff. 

Survivors are his widow, the for 
mer Margaret Cunningham; a 
brother, Harry Lucas; a daughter 
Mrs. Fred Storey, and a son, Lt 
John S. Lucas, now stationed in Eng- 
land. There are several grandchild- 



Court Refuses to Quash 
Film Extortion Charges 

(Continued from Page 1) 

by Federal Judge Murray Hulbert 
The court denied a motion for quash 
ing the indictment filed by Jame: 
D. C. Murray, defense counsel. Mur- 
ray had filed a demurrer to the in 
dictment, a special plea in bar anc 
a motion for a bill of particulars 
all of which were denied by thi 
court. 

The six are Louis Compagna, Pau 
de Lucia, Phil D'Andrea, Francis 
Maritote, Charles Gioe and Ralpl 
Pierce. Other defendants are Join 
Rosselli, former West Coast collec 
tor for the "syndicate," and Louis 
Kaufman, business agent of Newarl 
operators Local 244. 

The trial is set for Sept. 7. Boris 
Kostelanetz, special prosecutor, wil 
represent the Government. 



Lawrence Norris Dead 
Columbus, O. — Lawrence Norris 



Metro's short subject ad-publicity , brother of Walter J. Norris, manage] 
staff at the home office was announc- of Butterfield houses in Grand Rap 
ed yesterday. ' ids, Mich., is dead. 



Tuesday, July 20, 1943 



TNI 



DAILY 



J Crescent Courses 
For High Court 



{Continued from Page 1) 

>escent or its affiliates to secure 
permission of the U. S. District Court 
;o acquire any additional theaters 
n any_ situation where there is in- 
'lepe - * v. .t competition, the Supreme 
"oui-v ./** affirming Judge Davies' de- 
ision in the entirety might put a 
onclusive end to the whole case with 
ill of its implications for the other 
najor anti-trust suits that are pend- 
ing. 

A high attache of the Nashville 
District Court states that, in addi- 
tion to a complete affirmation of the 
decision which is considered alto- 
gether unlikely at this time, the 
Supreme Court can follow one of 
two other courses. It can issue an 
order correcting the decision of the 
lower court with reference to fu- 
ture acquisition of theaters in com- 
petitive situations or it can order 
further hearings by Judge Davies. 
Hinges on Court's Attitude 
The appeal made by the plaintiff 
hinges on the attitude of Judge 
,Davies with reference to all the- 
ater acquisitions. In the beginning 
jof the trial he stated that the Court 
was not interested in the way Cres- 
cent or its affiliates acquired any of 
the movie houses owned by them at 
that time and his findings of fact 
stated that "this Court does not 
'wish to be faced with the problem 
"of having to make further decis- 
ions each time an exhibitor defen- 
dant might wish to acquire a the- 
ater." 

In his argument that no Court can do 
'S anything about the acquisition of theaters 
'which eliminate independent competition af- 
'ter the acquisition is made, a part of the 
I appeal document filed by the Government, 
)! Special Solicitor Charles Fahy noted the 
fact that testimony revealed the acquisition 
by Crescent and its affiliates of ten the- 
aters in competitive situations. 

Mrs. Sudekum Included 
It is expected that Judge Davies will act 
before the Supreme Court hearing on a mo- 
tion by Chief Counsel George H. Armistead, 
Jr., on behalf of Crescent and other defen- 
dant corporations seeking the elimination 
I of certain passages in the findings of fact 
[; with a consequent alteration of the pro- 
posed decree and on three petitions from 
stockholders in Lyric Amusement Co.. Ken- 



U A-Disney Feature 
Sets Off Big Blast 

"How Victory Through Air Power 
Is Possible" — "Seversky Says Raids 
Can Blast Foes Out of War" were 
the eight-column heads which 
streamed across full pages of yester- 
day's New York Journal American de- 
voted completely to illustrations, cap- 
tions, and accompanying text descrip- 
tive of the UA-Disney opus current 
at the local Globe Theater. This edi- 
torial "blast" in behalf of "Victory 
Through Air Power" set promotional 
precedent for a full-length animated 
attraction. Prominently included in 
the full-page layout was a photograph 
of Major de Seversky whose theories 
on the war's winning were discussed. 



TO THE COLORS! 



• PROMOTED * 

LT. JAMES STEWART, USAAF, promoted to 

captain. 
JACK ANDREWS, USMC, formerly Hollywood, 

promoted to captain. 

— • — 

• ARMY * 

STANLEY FISHMAN, son of Zelig Fishman, New 

Haven. 
KENNETH BLEWETT, manager, Regal, Chicago. 
RICHARD RODEMS, Princess, Alton, III. 



MILTON HALE, executive secretary, Playgoers 

of Springfield, Mass. 
RAY THOMPSON, manager, Cateway, Chicago. 

* N A VY * 

IOSEPH HACKWORTH, manager, Grand, Alton, 

III. 
ROSWELL HOLMES, assistant manager, Strand, 

Westfield, Mass. 

* WAVES * 

LOUISE SMITH, Indiana-Illinois Circuit, La 
Porte, Ind. 



Reconsider Elimination 
Of Frisco Trolley Stops 



WAC Page to be Included 
In All Metro Press Books 



San Francisco — The Municipal 
Public Utilities Commission has 
voted to reconsider eliminating sev- 
eral streetcar stops along Market 
St. in the theater district at the 
behest of the theater industry, the 
California Theaters Association re- 
ported yesterday. 

Mrs. Hudda McGinn, secretary- 
manager of the CTA, said the com- 
mission had informed her the vote 
to reconsider the action would be 
taken July 26. The proposed "skip- 
stop plan" was to have gone into 
effect July 1, but the theater groups 
won a delay. 

The CTA organized opposition to 
the plan, going to merchants along 
the street for co-operation, on the 
grounds it would not solve any part 
of the city's congested traffic prob- 
lems. The intersections at which 
it was proposed the streetcars do 
not stop included Powell St., Jones 
and Mason. 

Opponents of the plan argued that 
an overcrowding of safety zones at 
5th, 6th and other streets would re- 
sult. The "skip-stop plan" was pro- 
posed by the office of defense trans- 
portation. 



Mrs. Kate Hartnett Dead 

Mrs. Kate Hartnett, one of the 
oldest employes in terms of years 
spent with 20th-Fox died in Wash- 
ington last week, after a short ill- 
ness. 



tucky Amusement Co., and Lawrenceburg 
Theaters, Inc.. asking that the divestiture 
order in the proposed decree be voided as 
to them. This would bring the case up to 
date for whatever action the higher court 
may take. 

It may prove of later importance that in 
the citation of individual defendants to the 
Supreme Court hearing at Washington, the 
name of Mrs. Nettie Sudekum. wife of Tony 
Sudekum, half owner in the Muscle Shoals 
Theaters, Inc., along with Louis Rosenbaum, 
owner of the other half of the stock was 
included. Hitherto Mrs. Sudekum had not 
been considered as a defendant in the suit. 

The Supreme Court at the forthcoming 
hearing is expected to review at least a 
part of the testimony taken between July 7 
and Aug. 29, 1941. the oral arguments of 
counsel on Dec. 1, 1941, and a hearing on 
motions on May 17, 1943, followed by the 
filing of a proposed decree, sections of which 
are the basis of the plaintiff's appeal to a 
higher court. 



Blackman Opens Offices 

Chicago — Edward Blackman, for- 
merly with Spitz and Adcock has 
opened an office at 33 North LaSalle 
for the general law practice. 



A complete page devoted to WAC- 
sponsored programs for exhibitors 
has been prepared by Ernest Emer- 
ling of Loew's and the WAC Public 
Relations Division. This page will 
be included in all M-G-M press books, 
and probably the campaign books of 
the other companies. 



Mrs. Margaret Moseley Dead 

Memphis — Mrs. Margaret Lee 
Moseley, for the past 20 years a 
projectionist for Paramount ex- 
change, is dead. She had been ill 
for some time. Mrs. Moseley was 
one of the oldest employes (in point 
of service) on Film Row. 



WAR SERVICE 

. . . on the Film Front 



A new Honor Roll, containing the names 
of 2,204 employes of Loew's Theaters, 
Metro, and Station WHN now in the armed 
services, has been placed in the lobby of 
the Loew Building. There are four gold 
stars. 

. . . _ V . . . — 

Rochester — This city's collective June 
Bond and Stamp sales were $170,000, toward 
which six theater men contributed $9,259. 
Loew's led the group by selling $5,426 
worth of Bonds and Stamps while the Pal- 
ace Theater totaled $3,026. The remainder 
of the sum came from the Century, the 
Temple, and Riviera, and the Lake Theaters. 

Sergeant Schiller Cohen, formerly an em- 
ploye of Loew's, just back from 52 missions 
as a tail gunner on a Flying Fortress, was 
responsible for War Stamp sales in amount 
of $1,450 at Loew's Metropolitan, Brook- 
lyn, opening night of "Bataan." Eddie Dow- 
den, of Oscar Doob's publicity staff, pre- 
sented Cohen to the audience and read 
the citation he received at the time he was 
presented with the Distinguished Flying 
Cross, it was part of Loew's Shangri-La 
war Stamp drive. 



KING OF THE COWBOYS 



ROY ROGERS TRIGGER 

SMARTEST HORSE IN THE MOVIES 

in 

"SONG OF 
TEXAS' 





rfvvoW* 



HRST RUN 



M I- 



P ID A INC 



2 H W 4- A S T 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 20, 1943 



N YC 



Visual Education 
Field Attracts PRC 



(Continued from Page 1) 

largest producers and distributors of 
16 mm. non-theatrical educational 
and entertainment films, with offices 
in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, 
San Francisco and Nashville. It 
has produced and distributed ap- 
proximately 60 shorts in the last 
three years. 



Three In Production 
In Brazilian Studios 



Rio de Janeiro (By Air Mail, 
Passed by Censor) — Production con- 
tinues in Brazilian studios with three 
pictures currently in work. Cinedia 
has " A Caminho do Ceu" before 
the cameras with Milton Rodrigues 
directing, while Atlantida is pro- 
ducing "Moleque Tiao" and Brasil 
Vita Filme is completing "Inconfi- 
dencis Mineira." 



No "Critical" List Decision 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington— The War Manpower 
Commissiton has not yet reached any 
final decision on the matter of is- 
suing a new "critical" list of jobs 
entitling their holders to draft de- 
ferment. Announcement of the new 
list was scheduled to be made by 
WMC by this time, but the question 
has again become a matter for intra 
agency argument. Officials were 
hopeful that it may be thrashed out 
Thursday after they had failed to 
reach any conclusion yesterday. 

Lt. James Crouch Missing 

Indianapolis — Lt. James Crouch, 
navigator on a Flying Fortress, is 
reported missing in action since a 
raid on Nantes, France. Before his 
entry into the Army Air Forces in 
January, 1942, he was employed by 
the RCA Victor Division, RCA, in 
the local plant. 

Scott on Lost USS Helena 

Rochester — Wilfred C. Scott, for- 
mer Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. em- 
ploye who enlisted in the Navy in 
1941, is believed to have been aboard 
the USS Helena, cruiser sunk in the 
battle of Kula Gulf. 



BACK IN CIVVIES 

Honorably Discharged 



LOUIE WEINER, from the USAAF, to UA home 
office exploiteer. 

STANLEY GRISCOULA, from Hie Army, to Na- 
tional Screen Service, New Haven. 

JAMES TOWNS, from the Army, to Broadway 
Theater, Dover, N. H. 

BEN SEICEL, from the Army, to manager, 
Whalley, New Haven. 

HAROLD LEWIS, from the Army, to production 
manager for Edward Small. 

HERBERT LYONS, from the Army, to B K pub- 
licity dept., Chicago. 

SGT. LOU LUSTY, frmo the Marine Corps. 



HOLLYWOOD DIGEST 



SIGNED 

HUGH MARLOWE, termer, M-C-M. 
DONALD DOUCLAS, termer, RKO. 
BENSON FONC, "Charlie Chan" series, Mono- 
gram. 

ASSIGNMENTS 

JACK CUMMINGS, producer, "Hold On to Your 

Hat," M-C-M. 
ERNST LUBITSCH, producer-director, "All Out 

Arlene," Warners. 
IRVING PHILLIPS and E. E. VERDIER, screenplay, 

"The Bamboo Blonde," RKO. 
DAVID HEMPSTEAD, producer, "None But the 

Lonely Heart," RKO. 



WALLACE FOX, director, "The Honor System," 

Monogram. 
WILIAM BEAUDINE, director, "Romance of 

Avenue B," Monogram. 
PHIL ROSEN, director, "Charlie Chan in the 

Secret Service," Monogram. 

CASTINGS 

DENA PENN, "One Hour of Glory" (tentative 
title), RKO; RUSSELL WADE, "Ghost Ship," 
RKO; GRACE MacDONALD and DAVID BRUCE, 
"The Professor Goes Wild," Universal; EDWARD 
FIELDING and TOODLES WEAVER, "The Story 
of Dr. Wassell," Paramount; LORETTA YOUNC, 
"And Now Tomorrow," Paramount; MARIA 
PALMER, "Revenge," RKO. 



Northern Calif. Exhibs. 
"Declare Independence" 



San Francisco — Seven-plank "Ex- 
hibitors' Declaration of Independ- 
ence" has been promulgated here by 
the Independent Theater Owners of 
Northern California. Text of "dec- 
laration" follows: 

"Refuse to make any deal which 
you cannot afford." 

"Refuse to play any picture at a 
certain loss." 

"Refuse to give up all your Sun- 
days." 

"Refuse to do business with any 
distributor whose policy and terms 
are notoriously unfair, arbitrary and 
arrogant." 

"Refuse to believe 'this is our only 
deal.' " 

"Refuse tin cup methods of buy- 
ing." 

Refuse to believe, that Red Blood- 
ed Americans will continue to take 
the licking the Distributors are 
handling out without doing some- 
thing about it." 



N. J. Associated Theaters 
Reelects Dollinger Prexy 



All officers of Associated Theaters 
of New Jersey were re-elected at 
the fifth ennual meeting last week. 
Personnel includes: Irving Dollinger, 
president; H. H. Lowenstein, presi- 
dent of the board; Jack Unger, vice- 
president; Sidney Seligman, treas- 
urer and David Mate, secretary. Jos- 
eph Siccardi was elected office man- 
ager, replacing Harry Lowenstein 
who resigned. 



Leavitt In Red Cross Post 

Cleveland, O. — Sanford Leavitt, as- 
sistant to M. B. Horwitz, general 
manager of the Washington Cir- 
cuit, has received an appointment 
as assistant field director for the 
Red Cross, with orders to report in 
Washington for duty on July 26. 
Leavitt, who is married and the 
father of a three-year-old daughter, 
is the son of Joe Leavitt, who oper- 
ates the Independent Screen Room 
in the Film Building. 

Lippert House to FWC 

San Francisco — The Studio The- 
ater in Vallejo, is now being oper- 
ated by the Fox West Coast The- 
aters, the California Theaters As- 
sociation announced today. It for- 
merly was a Lippert house. 



Lack of Foreign Films 
Closes Hub's Fine Arts 



Boston — After 12 years of opera- 
tion, the Fine Arts theater has 
closed for the duration and Manager 
George Kraska who inaugurated in 
Boston the showing of foreign films, 
has taken a temporary position as 
relief manager for Loew theaters, 
currently being at the Orpheum for 
three weeks and then transferring to 
the State for a month. 

Kraska gives as the reason for 
closing the lack of foreign films and 
the too strenuous competition af- 
forded by the large circuit theaters. 



M & P Closes Hub Esquire 

Boston — Esquire Theater in Bos- 
ton's Back Bay has closed for the 
Summer and perhaps for a longer 
period. Henry Kalis, managing di- 
rector, has been transferred to an- 
other M & P spot. 

Holdovers Set a Record 
In Buffalo First-Runs 



Buffalo — Downtown first-run 
houses are setting a record for hold- 
overs this week. "Mr. Lucky" at the 
20th Century and "Stage Door Can- 
teen" at Shea's Great Lakes are in 
their third weeks, and "Coney Is- 
land" at Shea's Buffalo is playing 
a second week. 

Only new bill is Abbott & Cos- 
tello in "Hit the Ice," heading a dual 
at Basil's Lafayette. 

The fifth first-run, Shea's Hippo- 
drome, has been taken over by Gen- 
eral Motors for its Victory Revue, 
"It's Only the Beginning," a stage 
and screen program for GM em- 
ployes. Use of a downtown first-run 
house for such a purpose is believed 
without precedent here. 



Bank of America 
Financing for PA 



5 

; 

1: 
lr 

: 



1 



(Continued from Page 1) 

launched by Lyons and David L 
Loew, the latter serving as presi- 
dent and business head of the com- 
pany, while Lyons will be/rv,, P r °-i 
duction chief. Financing P "^ jeing||f( 
handled by Bank of Amerf&i. A 
New York office will be established 
shortly. 

Clients of the A & S Lyons agency 
will be the backbone of the com- 
pany's talent, the artists having 
their choice of taking a salary for 
their work or participating in the 
profits of the pictures. As Lyons de- 
scribed it yesterday in New York, 
the company was designed for the 
preservation of the stars and the op- 
portunity for the newcomers. 

Jack Benny is scheduled to pro- 
duce three pictures for Producing 
Artists, while PA, itself, will pro- 
vide three others. First will be a 
musical on a lavish scale and the 
second will be a Jerome Kern mus- 
ical. The third may be a story about 
Belgium in the present war. 

Another musical may be based 
on the unpublished works of George 
Gershwin. A separate unit may be 
formed by Jerome Kern. 

Lyons said that because of the 
participating arrangement, a pic- 
ture's over-all expense would be less 
than one produced by a major com- 
pany. 



h 



Selznick and Cooper Pix 
As Film Classic Re-issues 



Film Classics, Inc., has acquired 
five David 0. Selznick productions 
and two produced by Merian C. Coo- 
per for re-issue during the next 21 
months. Pictures previously were dis- 
tributed by United Artists and RKO. 
They are obtained in a deal nego- 
tiated with Col. John Hay Whitney, 
Jr. 

Product included in the deal are "A Star 
is Born," "Little Lord Fauntleroy," "The 
Young-- in Heart," "Nothing- Sacred," "Made 
for Each Other," "Becky Sharp" and "Danc- 
ing Pirate." 



See Further Meetings On 
Naming of OWI Film Chief 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Possibility of fur- 
ther meetings with industry leaders 
by OWI domestic director Palmer 
Hoyt, before the naming of a man 
to serve as OWI Motion Picture 
Chief, was mentioned last night by 
an official close to Hoyt. The latter 
could not be reached for comment 
but it is not believed that any meet- 
ing is actually scheduled as yet. 



:; 



"Army" Into WB Memphis 
House After Remodeling 

Memphis — Warners' Theater will 
close for one week, beginning July 
30, to undergo remodeling, repairs '. 
and painting, according to Howard 
Waugh, zone manager. The theater 
will reopen Aug. 6, with "This is 
the Army." Picture is expected to 
run a month. 



Repeats at Waterbury Plaza 

Waterbury, Conn. — The Plaza has 
adopted a policy of repeat pictures. 



IN NEW POSTS 



NATHAN J. COULD, manager, Grand, Alton, III. 
WILLIAM GRADY, Princess, Alton, III. 
LARRY O'NEIL, manager, Suffolk, Holyoke, Mass. 



■1H 



■I 



Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 




>H Remove 

© NOT ^ 



The Daily Newspaper 
Oi Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



FDAILY' 



rcj34. 



NO. 14 



NEW YORK, WEDNESDAY, JULY 21, 1943 



TEN CENTS 



, 



Z: 



MAJORS APPEAL TO WMC ON 48-HOUR WEEK 

Foreign Mail-Check Shows Pix Copy Gets Over 



Editorial 



Post-war 

. . . Jones 9 views 

By CHESTER B. BAHN - 



ji/ICTORY — and peace — may be months 

* distant (although Barney Balaban told 

'aramount's sales meeting last week- 

i :nd that the end of the European war 

/ell may come this year), but there are 

increasing signs of awareness in industry 
anks of the necessity for giving attention 
siow to the shape of things to come in 
he post-war period. 

Largely, however, the expressions have 
teen confined to those voiced by execu- 
tes of major companies. One of the first, 
f not the first to stress the inescapable 
jroblems was Harry M. Warner, who spoke 
tut in early January on the urgency for 
Immediate post-war planning. Since then 
>thers have pointed up various phases — 
•he coming battle of titans for the restored 
oreign market, the possibility of inflation 
with its menace to all arms, the rehabilita- 
tion of theaters once the war ends, to 
:ite a few. 

[ Is the individual exhibitor and indepen- 
dent circuit operator less conscious of to- 
morrow's problems than the major execu- 
tive? — a moot question, that. As a cue 
o what the theater man is thinking these 
Jays, your columnar reporter steps aside 
to present five solicited paragraphs from 
fhe typewriter of John J. Jones of Chicago's 
lones, Linick & Schaefer circuit: 

Si o 



IT'S difficult to put in few words my 
• feelings regarding doing our part to 
:ombat inflation — and the discussion of a 
post-war program. . . . Much will require 
doing after Victory ... to remodel — 
modernize — refurnish — and provide funds 
for erection of new theaters where needed. 
i . . Unless theaters are allowed healthy 
profit their ability to amass cash will be 
limited. . . . It's an industry problem. . . . 
Major distributors, affiliated theaters will 
possess ample means. . . . But can't do 
job alone. 

"Hollywood forgets exhibitors did more 
than their share to make industry impor- 
tant. . . . Fine theaters created markets 
for finer films. . . . Many top Hollywood 
stars were discovered and encouraged by 
exhibitors playing vaudeville. . . . Numerous 
leading producers and distributors were 
theater men. ... All branches of the 
business are dependent on exhibitors for 
accurate patron information. . . . 
"Financial statements of distributors re- 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Degree of Regularity Var- 
ies Widely, Survey Made 
By Paramount Establishes 

A world-wide foreign mail-check 
survey, conducted by the Paramount 
Foreign Publicity Department dur- 
ing the first six months of this year, 
shows that motion picture publicity 
and advertising material sent as 
printed matter is reaching film com- 
pany foreign offices and publicity 
(Continued on Page 4) 

Kuykendall, Bernhard 
Checking WPB Change 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Ed Kuykendall, 
MPTOA president, was in Washing- 
ton yesterday to try to fathom some 
new developments in WPB, and to 
determine how they will affect the- 
ater operation. Warner Bros, vice- 
president Joseph Bernhard, is ex- 
pected here today on the same mat- 
ter. 

The whole thing is shrouded in 
secrecy thus far, but it is not ex- 

(Continued on Page 4) 

Lyon Will Appoint 
Newsreel Contact Man 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Selection of a man 
to serve as Government contact with 
the newsreels, filling the void left 
by the folding of Lowell Mellett's 
Motion Picture Bureau will be an- 
nounced soon by George Lyon, chief 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Willkie's Book Sold 
to Fox for Cash and % 

For what is reported in publish- 
ing circles as the largest down pay- 
ment ever made for film rights to 
a book, 20th-Fox has acquired 
"One World," best seller by Wendell 
L. Willkie, its board chairman. 
Closing of deal was announced yes- 
terday by Simon & Schuster, Inc., 
the publishers. 

Spyros Skouras is understood to 
have negotiated for 20th-Fox. Top 
down payment for a book previously 
is said to have been $175,000 paid 
by Warners for "Saratoga Trunk." 
Price of "One World" is described 
as in "excess of $250,000," and in- 
cludes a percentage provision, it 
is said. "One World" has sold in 
excess of 1,600,000 copies to date. 
Darryl F. Zanuck will produce the 
pic for 20th-Fox. Early scheduling 
is expected. 



Expect Decision In 
Few Days on Scollard 
Plea for Companies 



OWI Will Continue 
As "Clearing House" 

The OWI made it clear yesterday 
that it will continue to serve-as clear- 
ing house between the motion pic- 
ture industry and all Government 

(Continued on Page 11) 

Sicilian Invasion Shots 
In Next Week's Newsreels 



-Shots of the Sicily invasion are 
expected to be available for news- 
reel distribution in next week's re- 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Allied Board To Set Policy 

Divorcement, Decree and Suit Reopening Up 



Warners Will Re-issue 
Six Foran Westerns 



In addition to the two-reel West- 
erns being produced as part of the 
Vitaphone short subject lineup for 
1943-44, Warners will reissue a group 
of six Dick Foran outdoor features 
as part of its new season program. 

(Continued on Page 9) 



A national policy on theater di- 
vorcement, reopening of the Gov- 
ernment's trust suit and the exten- 
sion of the New York consent de- 
cree is expected to be adopted by 
Allied's board of directors Aug. 11- 
12 when the body convenes in Bal- 
timore. 

It was reported yesterday that Al- 

(Continued on Page 4) 

\ -J 



By ANDREW H. OLDER 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — The major compa- 
nies yesterday, through C., J. "Pat" 
Scollard, Paramount branch opera- 
tions chief, and Attorney Sidney 
Bromberg of Loew's, petitioned the 
Washington area office of WMC that 
local film exchanges not be required 
to go on a 48-hour week. It was 
decided at a New York meeting re- 

(Continued on Page 9) 

WAC Committee of 7 
Charts NEIC Course 



Affiliation of the WAC with the 
newly organized National Entertain- 
ment Industry Council probably will 
be determined by the recommenda- 
tions returned by an ex officio com- 
mittee comprised of the chairmen of 

(Continued on Page 9) 



Three State Legislatures 
"Alive" Although Recessed 



With the adjournment of the Ala- 
bama legislature on July 2, no state 
now has its solons in session, al- 
though three state legislatures have 
recessed until next month. They 

(Continued on Page 9) 



RCA "What's New?" 
Show to Tap Films 

The screen will be among the 
fields that will be tapped for ma- 
terial in a one-hour weekly "kaleidos- 
copic" program to be sponsored by RCA 
under the title "What's New," The 
broadcasts will go out over 158 
Blue Network stations from Maine 
to Hawaii beginning Saturday, Sept. 
4. The hour will be 7 to 8 p.m. 
Don Ameche will be master of 
ceremonies. The program will fea- 
ture "anything new and important" 
in every field of activity all over 
the world. Timeliness will be 
stressed. 



C' l N I I D * — *?" 

S H 1* *r M HZ 

N I A 1 1 V N i I 



Wednesday, July 21, 1943 




Vol. 84, No. 14 Wed., July 21, 1943 lOCents 



JOHN W. ALICOATE : : : 



Publisher 



DONALD M. MERSEREAU : General Manager 



CHESTER B. BAHN :::::: Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address: 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco- Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



FINANCIAL 



{Tuesday, July 20) 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat 16i/ 2 161/2 I6V2 — Vi 

Col. Picts.vtc. (2i/ 2 %) 18 1/4 17i/ 2 171/2 — 11/4 

Columbia Picts. pfd 

Con. Fm. Ind 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd.. 17- 16% 163/4 

East. Kodak 180 180 180 

do pfd 

Gen. Prec. Eq 21 1/2 21 3/ g 21 3/ 8 — 1/2 

Loew's, Inc 63 62 1/4 62i/ 2 — % 

Paramount 28 Vi 277/ 8 28 Vi + 'A 

RKO 9% 91/4 93/ 8 — i/ 8 

RKO $6 pfd 95 931/2 931/2 — 1 

20th Century-Fox .. 235/ 8 23 23 1/2 — Vis 
20th Century-Fox pfd. 34 33% 33i/ 2 — 1/4 

Warner Bros 15'/ 8 14% 14%— % 

Warner Bros 

do pfd 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Para. B'way 3s55 

Para.-Ficts. deb. 4s56 

Warner Bros.' dbs. 6s48 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Monogram iPicts 

RKO War. . . ., 1% 1% 1%— % 

Sonotone Corp 3% 3% 3% 

Technicolor 15% 14% 15 — % 

Trans-Lux 3% 3% 3% — % 

Universal IPicts. vtc. 18% I8V2 I8I/2 

Universal Picts 18% 18% 18% + % 

CAROLE LANDIS arrives from the Coast this 
morning. 

ERNST LUBITSCH is expected here from the 
Coast on Monday to attend the Aug. 4 Roxy 
premiere of "Heaven Can Wait," which he 
produced and directed for 20th-Fox. He will 
return West on Aug. 6. 



Refuse Assessment Slash 

Detroit— The Michigan State Tax 
Commission has refused to reduce 
the assessment for tax purposes on 
tae Palms-State Theater, first-run 
house. Appeal was taken by own- 
ers of several large downtown prop- 
erties when the city assessors in- 
creased valuations recently. Pres- 
ent figure will be "frozen" for three 
years. 



"Duke" Clark Subbing 
For Harry Goldstein 

Neil Agnew, Paramount general 
sales manager yesterday announced 
the appointment of M. R. "Duke' 
Clark, Los Angeles branch manager, 
to serve temporarily as district man- 
ager for Cleveland, Cincinnati, De- 
troit and Indianapolis, during the ill- 
ness of Harry Goldstein. Goldstein 
has been granted a six-month leave 
of absence to recover. Headquarters 
of the district are in Cleveland. 

Chester J. Bell, Denver branch 
manager, has been promoted to suc- 
ceed Clark as branch manager in 
Los Angeles. 

Announcement of Bell's successor 
in Denver is expected to be made 
shortly. 



Coe to Make Two Talks 
In Rochester on Aug. 3 



Charles Francis Coe will make two 
addresses in Rochester on Aug. 3 
when he speaks to the Rotary Club 
at noon and to executives of East- 
man Kodak officials, civic, political, 
religious, educational and women's 
club leaders in the evening. His 
evening address on the subject of 
"Motion Pictures Look Toward a 
New World" will inaugurate the new 
Eastman State Street Auditorium. 

During the afternoon, the MPPDA 
general counsel will confer with film 
people, radio commentators, editors 
and newspaper men. The local WAC 
will participate. 



Paramount Announces Its 
First New Season Block 



Paramount's first block of five 
pictures for the 1943-44 season was 
announced yesterday by Neil Ag- 
new, general sales manager. 

The group includes "Let's Face 
It," a musical starring Bob Hope 
and Betty Hutton; "True to Life," 
with Mary Martin, Franchot Tone, 
Dick Powell and Victor Moore; "Hos- 
tages," starring Luise Rainer, Ar- 
turo de Cordova, William Bendix and 
Paul Lukas; "The Good Fellows," 
comedy-drama with Helen Walker, 
James Brown and Cecil Kellaway, 
and "Tornado," starring Chester 
Morris and Nancy Kelly. 



Blumenstock to Chicago 

Mort Blumenstock, in charge of 
Warners advertising and publicity 
in the East, will accompany Charles 
Einfeld, director of advertising and 
publicity, to Chicago tonight for con- 
ferences with Army Emergency Re- 
lief officials on nation-wide premieres 
of Irving Berlin's "This is the 
Army." 

"Claudia" in Omaha Bow 

Omaha, the home town of Dorothy 
McGuire, who has the title role in 
20th-Fox's film version of the play 
"Claudia," will be the site of the 
world premiere of the production. 
The picture will bow on Aug. 19 at 
two houses there, the Omaha and 
the Paramount. 



Post-war 

. . . Jones 9 views 

(Continued from Page 1) 

fleet gigantic results. ... So much so it 
wouldn't be out of line for them to an- 
nounce 10 per cent or 15 per cent reduc- 
tion on flat rentals . . . and a 'cut' of 
some sort on percentage pictures. . . . Air 
lines recently did that. . . . Sometimes it 
seems the motion picture industry forgets 
it's a volume business — as such it should 
consider public benefit — that doesn't mean 
politicians — but people. . . . Majors should 
pass on portion of their good fortune to 
theaters and they in turn, when possible 
to the public. . . . 



"FOREIGN markets will open soon to 
' tremendous backlogs of big pictures. 
. . . All made and paid for. . . . Only cost 
will be distribution. . . . Exhibitors who 
carried the load when the foreign markets 
closed — now should share in the same. . . . 
Most businesses cut prices at every op- 
portunity. ... If exhibitors are given 
worth-while 'break' they will be able to 
build reserves. . . . Erect new theaters. . . . 
Modernize old ones. . . . And thus provide 
more revenue in the future for manufac- 
turers. . . . 

"The move taking cognizance of respon- 
sibility to the public must start at the 
top. . . . Major circuits with large holdings 
can lead the way. . . . Definite post-war 
plans must be made to combat inflation 
when War Bonds are cashed. ... To com- 
bat increased competition of television, 
better travel facilities, etc. . . . Discussing 
trade practices is a fine thing. . . . But 
without plans for after the war, we won't 
have much of a trade to practice on." 



152 Field Employes of 
20th-Fox Now In Service 



Latest figures compiled by the 
company disclose that 152 field em- 
ployes of 20th-Fox are in various 
branches of the armed forces. Here's 
the breakdown: 

Albany, 4; Atlanta, 7; Boston, 6; 
Buffalo, 1; Charlotte, 11; Chicago, 9; 
Cincinnati, 7; Cleveland, 5; Dallas, 
10; Denver, 4; Des Moines, 5; De- 
troit, 7; Indianapolis, 5; Kansas City, 
5; Los Angeles, 5; Memphis, 5; Min- 
neapolis, 4; New Haven, 5; New Or- 
leans, 2; New York, 7; Oklahoma, 6; 
Omaha, 2; Philadelphia, 1; Pitts- 
burgh, 5; Portland, 2; St. Louis, 1; 
Salt Lake, 2; San Francisco, 3; Seat- 
tle, 2; Washington, 4; Calgary, 2; St. 
John, 1; Toronto, 4; Vancouver, 1; 
Winnipeg, 2. 



Sturdivant Succeeds Bowles 

San Francisco — California The- 
aters Association, Inc., has elected 
B. V. Sturdivant prexy to succeed 
A. M. Bowles. 




COMinG and G0II1G 



iPVT. MAX GENDEL, of the Irving Berlin's 
"This is the Army" public relations unit is in 
Philadelphia working on the local campaign. 

IRVING BERLIN arrives in New York this 
noon from the Coast for conference with Army 
Emergency Relief and Warners executives on 
"This is the Army' premieres. 

NEIL SULLIVAN, ace RKO Pathe Ne(*\,eim 
eraman, is scheduled to leave shortly', the 
North African front as an accredited camera 
correspondent. 

NORMAN ELSON, general manager of the 
Trans-Lux Theaters, will be in Philadelphia 
today and in Washington tomorrow, returning 
to New York on Friday. 

DOROTHY LAMOUR is in Baltimore with her 
husband, CAPT. WILLIAM ROSS HOWARD, 
3rd, visiting the lafer's family. 

HERMAN RIFKIN of Republic Pictures, Boston, 
was a New Haven visitor for the frist time 
since his hospital stay after the Boston night 
club fire. 

JOE ERDANG, of Aetna Cleaning, up from 
New York to make the Loew-Poli circuit with! 
Harry Shaw. 

MRS. BEN LOURIE, wife of the new Columbia, 
Chicago salesman, Ben Lourie, moves this week 
from New Haven, his former post, to join Ben in 
Chi. 

VIRGINIA WEIDLER will start a P. A. en-' 
gagement in Philadelphia Friday. On Thursday 
she will visit Baltimore. 

MELVIN HIRSH, President of Crystal Pictures, 
left yesterday for a sales trip through Phila- ' 
delphia, 'Pittsburgh ■ and Cleveland. 

SPYROS SKOURAS stopped off in Washington 
on Creek War Relief business. 

HENRI ELMAN is en route from Chicago 
to New York on booking deals. 



Slott-Benisch Deal Confirmed 

Chicago — Nate Slott confirms the 
purchase of the Elmer Benisch the- 
aters, the Lindy, Madlin and Cen- 
tury. All Benisch personnel will be 
retained. 



Down to Four-a-Week 

Broadbrook, Conn. — Milton Gold- 
berg, operator of the Broadbrook, 
has cut his schedule tc four-a-week, 
instead of daily. 



C. E. O'Bryan's Mother Dead 

Detroit — Mrs. Eliza A. Pickering, 
67, is dead. She was the mother of 
Clarence E. O'Bryan, theater man- 
ager for United Detroit Circuit, and 
of Beryl O'Bryan, of the Butterfield 
Theaters office staff for many years. 



Reynolds Arbitration Adjourned 

Detroit — Hearing of the complaint 
brought by Howard T. Reynolds, op- 
erator of the Family Theater, Grand 
Rapids, in the Detroit tribunal, has 
been adjourned until Sept. 8. 




■■ 



Agnew Confirms 30 
On Paramount Lineup 

Paramount's new program will be 
flexible to meet the needs of the 
times as they develop, Neil Agnew, 
,; general sales manager, said yester- 
day in announcing that approximate- 
ly "' features would be released by 
the iipany in the 52 weeks start- 
ling Sept. 24. That Paramount plan- 
j tied to release 30 pictures for the 
'looming season was exclusively dis- 
closed in The Film Daily on May 11. 
T Agnew pointed out that in war 
times the tastes of the public change 
^rapidly and that Paramount's pro- 
|>ram would be geared to meet any 
situation that may arise. He as- 
ierted that the studio would deliver 
;he best product in the company's 
Jl-year history, with emphasis on 
oig productions. He reiterated a 
orevious statement to the effect that 
it least one-third of the 1943-44 pro- 
gram would be in Technicolor. 
['_ Among its more important pictures 
? or the new season will be "Lady in 
he Dark" and "Frenchman's Creek," 
( >oth in color, while in the field of 
•omantic comedy "No Time for Love" 
vill be a highlight. "The Unin- 
vited" also will be one of the bigger 
(ictures of the year, described as a 
i iiew type of love-mystery play. Mus- 
cals will have a dominant spot on 
he program, as well as farce com- 
idies, adventure dramas and "su- 
ler-escapist" entertainment, Agnew 
aid. 




'Army" Opening Deferred 

Cleveland, O. — Harry Goldberg, 
iVarner official, was in town this 
/eek in the interest of "This is the 
i.rmy," originally set to open July 
4 at Warners' Hippodrome, but 
'ostponed until an August date. 

Jaw Reports Teater Missing 

Indianapolis — Charles Leslie Tea- 
sr, formerly employed at the RCA- 
r ictor division of RCA, was among 
he missing in a Merchant Marine 
asualty list released by the Navy. 

i — 

durante In Camp P.A/s 
: Jimmy Durante will make six vol- 
nteer appearances during the next 
iree weeks at Army camps and Navy 
;ations. Tour will be under USO- 
amp Shows auspices. 




Ken Maynard 
Lenore Ulric 



Lawrence A. Urbach 
I. F. (Mike) Dolid 



Of Men and Maids: 

• • • DRAMA-LADEN dispatch by Daniel de Luce from Allied 
HQ, North Africa quoted in part AP Photographer Herb White's account 

of the landing of U. S. forces in Sicily "The skipper of my ship, 

Lt. H. R. Fleck, of New York City, is a World War veteran and dean 

of the skippers of this kind of vessel (landing craft) He made the 

causeway to shore with pontoons and our tanks and other things 

rolled into Sicily ready for action" Lt. H. R. Fleck, dear reader, 

is none other than Harold Fleck of Peerless Vaporate, film treatment 
process! 

T T T 

• • • FILM Fair-Sex: Ladies of the Variety Club out 

Cleveland way, along with their friends, have just held a meetin' in 
that Tent to organize a program of activities in behalf of the city's 

Stage Door Canteen and the USO They have been providing 

large store of food for these organizations, plus eagerly extended per- 
sonal services * Elsie Roberts, U of Houston (Texas) beauty and 

National Collegiate Bond Queen, leaves the Lone Star State in a 
few days for Hollywood for an RKO Radio two-week test that may result 

in a six-month contract Her mother will accompany her to 

Ye Coast When pic officials and stars were in Houston last 

May for opening of "Bombardier," Elsie, then newly-acclaimed in her 
freshman year as National Collegiate Bond Queen, was on hand as a 

member o' the welcoming group of theater people ..At that time, 

Charles Koerner, RKO Radio's vice-prexy in charge of production, 
met her and suggested a test, telephonic arrangements for which have 

just have been completed with Ben Piazza, casting director 

Since attaining a national prominence last Spring, Elsie's mail has 

averaged some 200 letters a week from all comers of the globe 

They came mostly from our soldier and sailor lads, with whom the 
comely Elsie is a "pin-up" sensation. ... * Anent Houston, Mrs. Al 
Lever, wife of Interstate's city manager, is one of the four semi- 
finalists in the women's championship flight of the War Bond Golf 
Tournament. ... % On the more dour side of femme doings is dis- 
patch from Springfield, III. where the weekly Citizen's Tribune is ad- 
vocating that the community's theater managers get out the old 27- 

second slide which reads: "Ladies, Please Remove Your Hats" 

Cause of this outburst is prevalence of picture hats (can it be the 
power of suggestion,? we ask) among Springfield women, and the 
custom .of leaving them on at the movies One redeeming feature 

(according to the nooze story) is that the lady of today is more polite 
about the hat nuisance than her mother was— probably because there 
are no hatpins and veils 

▼ ▼ T 

• • • MEN'S DEPARTMENT: Just in case you more'n 200 

pic guys who attended that swell testimonial dinner which the Variety 
Club tendered in Buffalo's Hotel Statler on Monday night to Syd Samson, 
promoted from Buffalo branch manager to General Manager for Canada 
for 20th-Fox, didn't see from more removed tables what gift, in addition 
to the friendship scroll you all signed, was given to him, — 'twas a 
diamond-studded, platinum wrist watch. . . • Frank Smith manager of 
the RKO Palace in Chi. is in charge of the big stage show to be pre- 
sented for the Navy on the night of July 30 in the huge Chicago 

Stadium More than 20,000 persons are expected to witness the 

spectacle. . . • Metropolitan bookies are betting 2-to-l that Herb (Jay 
Emanuel) Miller WAS at the Sam Wood luncheon t'other day 

Y T ▼ 
• • • AVENGE PEARL HARBOR! 



DATE BOOK 



July 22-23: Republic regional, North 
wood studios. 



Holly- 



July 26: Leon Herman testimonial, Ten Eyck 
Hotel, Albany. 

July 28-29: Kansas-Missouri Theaters Association 
convention, Kansas City. 

July 29: Loew's stockholders special meeting, 
home office. 

Aug. 3: Charles Francis "Socker" Coe addresses 
Rochester, N. Y., Rotary Club and Eastman 
meeting. 

Aug. 11-12: Allied board meeting, Baltimore. 

Sept. 9: ITOA installation luncheon, Hotel 
As tor. 

Sept. 9: Third Victory Loan drive opens. 

Sept. 15: First Fall meeting of Ampa. 

Oct. 18-22 SMPE technical conference, Holly- 
wood-Roosevelt Hotel, Hollywood. 



Akron Enforces Curfew; 
Violator's Parent Fined 

Columbus, O. — While Mayor Floyd 
Green has signed a curfew bill, ef- 
fective immediately, banning all Co- 
lumbus youngsters under 17 from 
the streets after 10:30 p.m., spe- 
cifically forbidding attendance in 
places of amusement and entertain- 
ment after that hour, unless ac- 
companied by elders, the first case 
of curfew violation in Akron re- 
sulted in a fine of $25 and costs 
against a parent for permitting his 
12-year-old son out after the 11 p.m. 
deadline. In Columbus, too, the pen- 
alties are against parents. For the 
first offense a child will be taken 
home and his parents warned, but 
for the second offense the parents 
or guardian may be fined up to $10, 
and for the third and later offenses, 
penalties are up to $25 fine and 10 
days in jail. 

Other curfew developments in Ohio are: 

ALLIANCE — City Council has passed an 
ordinance setting- a 10 p.m. curfew for boys 
and girls under 16, streamlining- a measure 
originally passed in 1908. 

WARREN — Thoug-h the city's curfew or- 
dinance long in existen.ce prescribes a 9 p.m. 
deadline, officials have decided to permit 
children of 16 and under to stay out until 
10 p.m. Later than that, they must be 
accompanied by oldsters. 

SALINEVILLE — Children under 14 must 
be home by 10 p.m., council decided, after 
a committee of women requested a curfew 
measure. 

KENT — Council passed a curfew ordi- 
nance, following petitions signed by 1,500 
residents, to keep kids under 15 off the 
streets after 10 p.m. 

Cities where curfew legislation is pend- 
ing, but held for further consideration, in- 
clude Salem, Canton, and Delaware. 



WEDDING BELLS 



Las Vegas, Nev. — Gertrude Niesen 
has been married here to Albert 
Greenfield, Chicago restaurateur. 



Sgt. Elliott Kronish, formerly at 
the Loew-Poli division office, New 
Haven, and now at Bangor Airfield, 
will be married July 27 to Ruth Sand- 
ers of Bangor. 



mm 



3% 



Wednesday, July 21, 1943 



DAILY 



Allied Board to Set 
Policy At Meet 

(Continued from Page 1) 

lied plans to take a definite stand on 
a number of industry problems and 
at the same time start the ma- 
chinery moving toward putting its 
policies in action. 

Meanwhile, independent sentiment 
on theater divorcement and renewal 
of the Government suit appears to 
be divided. While some sections of 
the country apparently are opposed 
to the decree and all of its provis- 
ions, other sections are taking a 
passive attitude and not caring much 
what happens as long as full-sea- 
son selling is restored. 

Regional West Coast meetings con- 
ducted by the Pacific Coast Con- 
ference brought about a decision to 
map out a program for changes in 
the consent decree which would be 
submitted to the Department of Jus- 
tice prior to Nov. 20. It was indi- 
cated that the independents all up 
and down the coast would stand to- 
gether on recommendations for re- 
visions. 

Loew's Theaters June War 
Bond Sales at $1,661,257 

Loew's theaters War Bond depart- 
ment reports Bond and Stamp sales 
for the month of June totalling $1,- 
661,257, exclusive of Bond sales to 
employes through payroll deduction 
plan and to executives. This brings 
the Loew theater booth sales since 
Sept. 1, last to $30,000,594.40, with 
an additional total of $5,391,728 to 
employes. From March, 1942 to 
June 30, 1943, period during which 
Loew's have acted as Bond sales- 
men, the grand total of sales has 
reached $41,633,521. 

C. C. Moskowitz, Loew executive, 
points out that the theater booth 
sales doubled immediately after 
Loew's theaters became official 
Treasury issuing agents. 

New York area theaters of the 
Loew circuit piled up a June total 
of $1,216,877, of which $129,202 was 
in War Stamps. Loew's out-of-town 
houses sold a total of $444,380. 



Mid-West Mayor, Circuits 9 Boohing Chief, 

Plans City Haul ($) to Help Blast Axis 

North Chicago— Mayor John Dromey of this lively cummunity of some 12,000 
is still a showman, his official standing notwithstanding. Before taking office, 
he was Great States theater chain's head booker headquartering in Chicago. Now 
he's staging, in fact tonight, a big civic celebration with the aid of 
the Great Lakes Naval Band and co-op. of Billy De Wolfe, well-known film 
comic; John Carter, radio singer; and the Tune Toppers,— all Great Lakes Naval 
Station sailors. Affair's objective is to raise $75,000 for a fighter plane to be 
named City of North Chicago. Sid Schatz, owner of the local Sheridan Theater, 
is also co-operating. Bob Elson, former ace WGN sports broadcaster will serve 
as master of ceremonies. 



WAR SERVICE 

. . .on the Film Front 



Pix Ads, Blurbs Get Overseas 

But Degree of Regularity Varies Widely 



(Continued 
media in satisfactory condition, but 
in widely varying degrees of regu- 
larity. 

The survey covered 34 foreign 
countries, but so far only 14 of these 
have been heard from in the first 100 
replies. Returns from the 14 coun- 
tries show that mail-checks acknowl- 
edging receipt of material have 
come back to New York on 100 ac- 
tual deliveries of publicity and ad- 
vertising material. 

105 Days to Cairo 

The quickest New York-to-foreign- 
country mail, according to the sur- 
vey, is on material sent to Mexico 
City, which arrived at that city in 
11 days. The longest time for mail 
to reach the same destination was 
34 days. The slowest point-to-point 
delivery was from New York to 
Cairo, which took 105 days for the 
delivery of a single parcel. 

Countries from which 10 or more returns 
have been received are: Argentina, Cuba, 
Mexico, Trinidad and Venezuela, all in the 
Western Hemisphere. Parcels took from 20 
to 64 days to reach Argentina; from 12 to 
34 days to reach Cuba; from 11 to 34 days 



from Page 1) 
to reach Mexico; from 21 to 41 days to 
reach Trinidad; and from 40 to 64 days to 
reach Venezuela. 

Two mailing's each to Honduras, New 
Zealand and Uruguay respectively took from 
48 to 62 days, 39 to 91 days and 34 to 54 
days. Eight parcels sent to Puerto Rico 
took from 15 to 67 days. 

Two acknowledgments from Australia show 
that one parcel took 29 days and another 
took 35 days to reach Sydney. Eight re- 
turns from Brazil show that delivery took 
from 28 to 41 days. One parcel, sent by 
case with other material, took 77 days to 
get to England. Five mailings to Guatemala 
took from 24 to 49 days. 

20 Other Countries Checked 

Mail-check forms sent with parcels to 20 
other countries including Chile, Colombia. 
India, Panama, Peru, Portugal, Sweden and 
Turkey have not come back to New York, 
although the first parcels containing these 
were mailed as long ago as Feb. 25. It is 
believed, however, that returns from many 
of these spots are now on the way back 
by boat mail. Material for Sweden, it should 
be pointed out, is sent via London for spe- 
cial handling from that point. 

In no instance was it indicated that any 
of the material was not received in either 
good or fair condition. In almost every case 
condition of the material was said to be 
good, despite the fact that every single 
parcel had to be opened and inspected at 
at least one point of censorship and sometimes 
at several. 



Detroit — Keyed to the current Allied 
drive in Sicily and subsequent points North 
and as a prelude to the theaters partici- 
pation in the Treasury Department's Third 
War Loan beginning Sept. 9, t\\a? ^ted 
Detroit Theaters are running an '. ..sion 
Bond Campaign. Houses are showing a 
special trailer urging Detroiters to "join 
the invasion and hasten the day of Victory" 
by buying an "invasion bond." The bonds 
are accompanied by a decorative sticker 
in honor of the Sicilian attack. 

Exhibitors who adopt this plan may ob- 
tain a negative of the trailer from the 
National Screen Service. 



Buy "Cisco Ed" Stories 

Writ Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Phil Krasne and Sam 
Burkett have bought the rights to 
"The Cisco Kid" stories from 20th- 
Fox. They have not selected a star 
as yet. 



C'est La Guerre? 

A visitor at Mort Blumenstock's 
office, during one of the season's 
muggiest days found the atmos- 
phere pretty warm for a supposedly 
air-cooled sanctum. 

"What's wrong with your cooling 
system?" the caller asked the War- 
ner exec. 

"Search me," replied Mort, "it 
worked swell all last winter!" 



Kuykendall and Bemhard 
Checking WPB Reorg. 

(Continued from Page 1) 

pected to have as serious conse- 
quences as appeared last week. Al- 
though the nature of the changes 
cannot now be revealed, insofar as 
the organizational setup is concern- 
ed, there is a possibility that exhibi- 
tors will have to increase their pa- 
per work for Washington, that con- 
trol over theater service will pass to 
men who have no known industry 
authorities among them, and that 
these men will have within their au- 
tority the right to regulate hours of 
operation. These are all remote pos- 
sibilities, it must be emphasized, al- 
though it is definite that there has 
been a change in authority over 
some operations with which theaters 
are concerned. 



Training Film Meet in Chi. 

Chicago— A two-day Mid- Western 
visual training films meeting has 
been scheduled for the University of 
Chicago, Friday and Saturday with 
exhibits from 20 manufacturers, ac^ 
cording to W. F. Kruse of Bell & 
Howell. 



Lyon Will Appoint 
Newsreel Contact Man 

(Continued from Page 1) 

of the OWI News Bureau, to whom 
the newsreel assignment has fallen. 
Lyon worked with the newsreels for 
several months prior to the forma- 
tion of OWI, when he was head^of 
the press section of the OEM Di- 
vision of Information. 

Lyon told The Film Daily yes- 
terday he hopes to have a "corking 
good newsreel man" put on his staff 
soon, a man the reels will have com- 
plete confidence in and who can "talk 
their language." Although OWI will 
not maintain a crew and will offer 
no footage to the reels, Lyon hopes 
to supply them with a steady flow 
of good story ideas. He hopes these 
stories will offer sufficient latitude 
so that all five reels can go in and 
shoot and each come out with a dif- 
ferent story, rather than having "one 
story and four carbon copies," as he 
puts it. 



Sicilian Invasion Shots 
In Next Week's Newsreelsi 

(Continued from Page 1) 

leases. Norman Alley, News of the 
Day cameraman representing the Al- 
lied newsreel pool, has arrived here 
with between 4,000 and 5,000 feet of 
film. The Navy and Coast Guard! 
also have brought back considerable 
footage. 

Film is said to be now in Wash- 
ington for reviewing and may be 
released to the newsreels tomorrow 
for next week's issues. 

Army-Navy Receives 12,000 
Feet of Film On Sicily 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Twelve thousand 
feet of news pictures on the Sicilian 
invasion were received by the Army's 
Bureau of Public Relations and the 
Navy here yesterday and will be run 
off this morning. Eight thousand 
came from .Army and newsreel pool 
men in the Mediterranean area, 
while the other 4,000 was brought 
back from the Mediterranean by Nor- 
man Alley, ace cameraman who was 
with the Navy in the invasion area 



Drop Wednesday Shows 

Rochester — Wednesday shows have 
been dropped for the Summer by the 
Empress, operated by Harry Tish- 
koff. 



Omaha Adopts Curfew 
Law, Effective July 27 

Omaha — The City Council has 
passed the 10 p.m. curfew ordinance, 
but still has reached no agreement 
on a means of warning those undei 
16 to get off the streets at 10. The 
law becomes effective July 27. 

Commissioner Harry Knudsen sug- 
gested four air raid sirens be blowr 
at 10, but Commissioner Roy Tow! 
objected this might make air raic 
warnings confusing. 

The ordinance was introduced tc 
give police a means to combat a ris- 
ing tide of juvenile vandalism thai 
has been common in theaters as wel 
as in other public places. Parents 
are made liable with fines running 
from $1 to $100 or ajail sentence li 
the penalty is not paid. 

10 p.m. Jamestown Curfew 

Jamestown, N. Y. — Curfew ordi 
nance has been revived here afte 
a lapse of several years. Curfei 
hour is set at 10 p.m. 



MHH 



/ 



A 



';»<M 



*i* *^' 

►-*■*. 



N 



>v, 



\ 



/^ 



The Strangest 
Love Story Ever 



flu 



\ 






V 



* 



4 



;\ 



0, 



'ne of the great love- 
dramas of today, filmed 
against a background of 
flaming destruction! 




THE THRILLS 
C MM A 



WARF 



•l 



BLOOD AND SWEAT 



AND TEARS COMES 
THIS MEMORABLE 
DRAMA! 






ESS?* 



»• 



v* i< 



>**"<Mi*" 






xc 

COURAGEOUS 
FIRE . . . COME 
ROMANCE! 



< 



Afc 



f/^ i 



& 






BUY WAR STAMPS EVERY DAY! 
SELL WAR STAMPS EVERY DAY! 



*' 




EMENT OF A 
VE... UNDER 
I MIGHTY 



? arl Esmond I F"l 





THE GREAT 

PERSONAL DRAMA 

OF WAR-TORN 

LOVERS! 



'^*wBu* 



fw*"* 



'"%, 



d4fi 



-I'm, 



Merle 

OBERON 

Brian 

AHERNE 

First Comes Courage 

with CARL ESMOND * ISOBEL ELSOM • ERIK ROLl/ 

ICTURJ 

MORE T 

PEOPLE WILL SEE THESE 

FULL PAGE COLOR ADS IN 

13 POPULAR NATIONAL 

MAGAZINES 



4 MODERN 
SCREEN 



3 MOVIE STORY • MOTION 
PICTURE -SCREENLAND 
SILVER SCREEN 
MOVIE SHOW 




in 



2 MOVIES 

MOVIE STAR PARADE 

SCREEN GUIDE • STARDOM 
1 PHOTOPLAY- 
MOVIE MIRROR 
SCREEN ROMANCES 
MOVIE LIFE 




Wednesday, July 21, 1943 



DAILY 



Majors Appeal On 
48-Hour Week 



(Continued from Page 1) 
cently that ,Scollard present a letter 
outlining the common position of 
the majors in respect to the 48-hour 
week. A decision from the Wash- 
•ton office is expected within three 
j our days. 

As for the matter of essentiality 
for exchange workers Scollard was 
advised by G. T. Beekman, Wash- 
ington assistant director, to file a 
petition to be considered by the ap- 
propriate authorities. This repre- 
sented a further retreat from his 
statement of a month ago when he 
told local branch managers that ex- 
change workers were in the eyes of 
the Washington area, WMC, essen- 
tial. Later he amended that to im- 
ply that they could not be so con- 
sidered unless they went on the 48- 
hour week. Now he just isn't talk- 
ing. # j 
Scollard, presenting a letter signed 
by Paramount, Columbia, Loew's, 
Republic, R K 0, Twentieth-Pox, 
United Artists, Universal and VrEa- 
graph, used a baseball team as an 
anology in presenting the case be- 
fore Beekman. It is absolutely nec- 
essary, he said, that all workers be 
on hand in the exchanges, even 
though they may not be working 
every day. Because exchanges are 
not engaged in production, he said, 
there is no way to increase their out- 
put by putting workers on longer 
hours. 

With the current print shortage 
and O'DT restrictions on deliveries 
there is a much faster turnover of 
prints, and the inspection force and 
other departments of the exchanges 
must be working at top speed each 
day during the time the work is on 
hand for them to do. There can be 
no carryover of work until the next 
day, he said, because that might mean 
dark theaters. Time is all-important 
with each day an entity. 

He pointed out also that exchanges 
have been exempted from the 48-hour 
week in all cities where it is in ef- 
fect thus far except one, where no 
decision has yet been reached. 



HOLLYWOOD DIGEST 



SIGNED 

PINKY LEE, termer, Hunt Stromberg. 

ASSIGNMENTS 

MARC CONNELLY, screenplay, "Passport to 

Dakar," Universal. 
HORTON FOOT, screenplay, "Seventy-two 

Hours," Universal. 



CASTINGS 

SIR CEDRIC HARDWICKE and THOMAS 
MITCHELL, "Woodrow Wilson," 20th-Fox; 
NANCY COLEMAN and HELMUT DANTINE, 
"Coffin for Dimitrios," Warners; PAUL LUKAS, 
"Uncertain Glory," Warners; RED SKELTON, 
"Hold On to Your Hat," M-C-'M; THOMAS 
MITCHELL, "The Sullivans," 20th-Fox; ALBERT 
BASSERMAN, "Rhapsody in Blue," Warners; 
HUCH MARLOWE, "The Canverville Ghost," 
M-C-M; CHARLES IBICKFORD, "The Eve of St. 
Mark," 20th-Fox; RICHARD DIX, "Chost Ship," 
RKO; KATINA PAXINOU, "The Rurales," Para- 
mount; GENE KELLY, "Cover Girl," Columbia; 
GALE STORM, "College Sweetheart," Monogram; 
BENSON FONG, "Charlie Chan in the Secret 
Service," Monogram; VERNELL VERNON, "Girl 
from Monterey," PRC; CEORGE RILEY, "Rhap- 
sody in Blue," Warners; FRANCIS 
McDONALD, RUSSELL SIMPSON and ]. FARRELL 
MacDONALD, "Texas Masquerade," Harry Sher- 
man-UA; WILLIAM R. FRANK, JR., "Dr. Paul 
Joseph Coebbels, His life and Loves," W. >R. 
Frank; CORNEL WILDE, "Four Jills and a Jeep," 
20th -Fox. 



VINCENT PRICE, "Woodrow Wilson," 20th- 
Fox; GRANT MITCHELL. "See Here, Private Har- 
grvoe," M-C-M ; JACKIE MORAN, "Andy 
Hardy's Trouble," M-G-M; RONALD GRAHAM, 
"Greenwich Village," 20th-Fox; WALLY BROWN, 
ALAN CARNEY, JOHN CARRADINE, ROBERT 
RYAN, AMELITA WARD and JAMES BELL, 
"An American Story," RKO; CEORGE GIVOT, 
"Government Girl," RKO. 



STORY PURCHASES 

ARCHIBALD RUTHLEDGE'S "The World's Big- 
gest Negro Business," 20th-fox. 

WLLIIAM HARD'S "The Typographical Union: 
Model for All," 20th-Fox. 

LOUISE RANDALL PIERSON'S "Roughly Speak- 
ing," Warners. 

EILEEN JOHNSTON'S play "Jeanne d'Arc," M- 
G-M. 

PAUL GALLICO'S "Romance of Henry Menafee," 
M-G-M. 

THOMAS WADLETON'S "Army Brat," M-G-M. 

BOOTH TARKINGTON'S "Kate Fennigate," Ed- 
ward Small. 

FRITZ LIEBER, JR.'s "Conjur Wife," Universal. 

WALTER GRAHAM'S "A Hundred Girls and a 
Plane," PRC. 

LOU BROCK'S "Door to Dardanelles," PRC. 

"Hold On to Your Hats," M-C-M. 

H. I. PHILLIPS' "All Out Arlene," Warners. 

HELEN DE WITT JOHNSTON'S "The Lady of 
the Lampoon," RKO. 

RICHARD LLEWELLYN'S "None But the Lonely 
Heart," RKO. 



Warners Will Re-issue 
Six Foran Westerns 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Selling of these pictures already has 
started, and the first three, "Song of 
the Saddle," "Cherokee Strip" and 
"Prairie Thunder," are expected to 
go in release by October. 

When originally released, about 
five seasons ago, the Foran pictures 
received only limited distribution. 
With the growing scarcity of sec- 
ond features for double bills, Warner 
sales executives considered it op- 
portune to revive the series. 



Three State Legislatures 
"Alive" Although Recessed 



Canadian Sendoff for "Mission" 
Toronto — Following the Canadian 
premiere of "Mission to Moscow" at 
Shea's Theater, executives of 12 
prominent Dominion organizations 
headed by William Dunn, treasurer 
of the Labor Council and member of 
the War Labor Board Advisory Com- 
mittee, joined with Dr. L. T. Morgan, 
Department of Economics, Univer- 
sity of Toronto, in sending a tele- 
gram to Jack L. Warner, commend- 
ing the picture. 



TO THE COLORS! 



• PROMOTED • 

THOMAS ORCHARD, USNR, former assistant 
producer, March of Time, promoted to 
lieutenant commander. 



Scroll to List Theaters 
Playing "This is the Army' 



Jack L. Warner, who arrived in 
New York on Monday from the 
Coast, said yesterday that when the 
company presents the proceeds from 
Irving Berlin's "This is the Army" 
to the Army Emergency Relief, the 
check will be accompanied by a 
scroll bearing the names of all the- 
aters that played the pic. 

Warner, who co-produced "This is 
the Army" with Hal B. Wallis, is 
here conferring with Army Relief 
officials on the Broadway world pre- 
miere of the picture and the long 
list of special advanced-price pre- 
mieres to be held throughout the 
country following the New York 
opening. 



Follies Girl" Into Earle 

"Follies Girl," the William Row- 
land Production made for PRC has 
been booked by the Warner Circuit 
in Philadelphia to play at the Earle 
sometime in August. This is the 
first PRC picture to play at the 
Earle Theater. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
are Missouri, Wisconsin and New 
Jersey. 

While a large number of bills af- 
fecting the motion picture industry 
were introduced in most states, none 
of any importance became laws. 
Most of them either died in com- 
mittee or failed to reach a committee 
hearing. 

The anti-blind checking measure in 
New Jersey is said to be still alive 
ijnsofair 'as consideration is (con- 
cerned, although the odds appear to 
be overwhelmingly against its pas- 
sage with only a slight possibility 
that it will reach a hearing at the 
coming session. 



Only Six Starting 
Bui 50 Shooting 



IV est Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Production's pace 
slackens again this week with only 
six new pix getting the gun, but the 
total before cameras stands at 50. 
The check-up: 

At Columbia: Six shooting. 

At M-G-M : Eight shooting, includ- 
ing "Andy Hardy's Blonde Trouble," 
with Mickey Rooney, Lewis Stone, 
Fay Holden, Sara Hadan, Herbert 
Marshall, Bonita Granville, Marta 
Linden, Lee and Lyn Wilde, Keye 
Luke and Jean Porter. Carey Wil- 
son producing and George B. Seitz 
directing. 

At Monogram: Two shooting. 

At Paramount: Six shooting, including the 
Pine and Thomas Production, "Timber 
Queen," melodrama of hard-hitting action 
geared for comedy, starring Richard Arlen 
and Mary Beth Hughes, with June Havoc, 
Sheldon Leonard, George E. Stone, Dick 
Pureell, Tony Hughes, Edmund MacDonald, 
Bill Haade, Clancy Cooper, Dewey Robinson, 
Horace McMahon, Jimmy Ames and Al Mur- 
phy. Frank McDonald directing. 

At RKO-Kadio: Five shooting, including 
"Gildersleeve On Broadway," starring Har- 
old (Gildersleeve) Peary, with Billie Burke 
in a prominent role. Gordon Douglas di- 
recting. 

Sam Goldwyn: Shooting two. 

At Republic: Two shooting. 

At 20th Century-Fox: Four shooting. 

At United Artists: Three shooting, includ- 
ing Samuel Bronson's "Jack London"; 
Gregor Rabinoviteh Production, "The Girl 
From Leningrad"; and, Harry Sherman's 
"Texas Masquerade," Hopalong Cassidy, 
starring William Boyd, with Andy Clyde, 
Jimmie Rogers, Mary Correll, Russell Simp- 
son, J. Farrell McDonald and June Pick- 
rell. George Archainbaud directing. 

At Universal: Seven shooting, including 
"The Professor Goes Wild," with Grace 
McDonald, David Bruce, George Dolenz and 
Lois Collier. Reginald LeBorg directing, 
Frank Gross, associate producer. 

At Warners: Five shooting, including the 
Jesse L. Lasky production, "Rhapsody in 
Blue," film story of the composer's life, 
starring Joan Leslie and Robert Alda, with 
Charles Coburn, Morris Carnovsky, Paul 
Whiteman, Al Jolson, George White, Oscar 
Levant, Virginia Sale, Christian Rub and 
George Riley. Irving Rapper directing. 



WAC Committee of Seven 
To Chart NEIC Course 



(Continued from Page 1) 

WAC's seven divisions, it was learned 
yesterday. 

No immediate action is indicated. 
In all probability, the ex officio com- 
mittee will study the NEIC program 
and setup for several weeks, and pos- 
sibly a month, before formulating 
its recommendations. 

George J. Schaefer is chairman 
of both the WAC and the NEIC. 
Preliminary discussion of WAC af- 
filiation at last week's WAC confer- 
ence here disclosed a variety of opin- 
ion on the subject, it is understood. 



Guilford Drops Matinees 

Guilford, Conn. — The Guilford 
Theater, usually looking forward to 
the Summer season, has cut out all 
matinees this year. Pleasure driving 
ban has hurt business severely along 
this beach section, where summer 
cottages are far from the theater. 



Shoot Table Tennis Short 

A table tennis short, produced by 
Max Cohen for Columbia, and fea- 
turing Coleman Clark, former na- 
tional champion, and Allan Thomas, 
will go into production this week 
at the Westchester Country Club, 
Rye, N. Y. Harry Foster will direct 
with casting handled by Max Rich- 
ards. 



A/C Ray Ellis Dies 

in Crash of Plane 

Waco, Tex.— A/C Ray F. Ellis, 
20, former page boy at the RKO 
Radio home office, was killed in a 
AAF training plane crash 
Wrij , Monday near this city. The 
pS^ eighth RKO gold star, Ellis 
had taken his preliminary 
training at the Preflight School at 
San Antonio, and had been trans- 
ferred to the Army Air Base at 
Waco only a short time before he 
met death. 



10 



w 



k DAILY 



Wednesday, July 21, 1943 






A -V RCVI6UJS Of THE nCIU FILfllS £• > 



'Behind the Rising' 
Sun" 



with Margo, Tom Neal, J. Carrol Naish 

RKO Radio 89 Mins. 

POWERFUL DRAMATIC EXPOSE OF 
JAPAN, PACKING ROMANCE, RUGGED 
ACTION AND BIG PROMOTIONAL VAL- 
UES. 

In the welter of war films to date, the 
chief accent has been upon exposing to 
the view of freedom-loving millions the 
nefariousness of the Nazi system, the 
brutality of its exponents, and the unbridled 
atrocities of its military machine. But now 
the full and revealing spotlight has been 
turned by RKO Radio, through the in- 
strumentality of James R. Young's re- 
vealing and authoritative book, upon the 
Far Eastern end of the Axis, Japan, — termed 
by Ambassador Joseph Grew as our prime 
enemy. "Behind the Rising Sun," title 
of both book and picture, is a stirring 
account of Japan, both in the present 
war and in the years immediately pre- 
ceding the conflict. 

Let it be clear here and now to exhi- 
bitors everywhere that this is no pedantic 
documentary film, but a slash-bang meller, 
based on facts, which will lift audiences 
out of their seats as the result of head- 
long action, stark events, and, at times, 
breathless excitement and scenes which 
rouse the onlooker both to indignation and 
a realization of the fierce foe with whom 
we are locked in combat in the Pacific 
sectors. 

Fundamentally, "Behind the Rising Sun" 
is something of a companion piece to the 
heavy-grossing "Hitler's Children" in that 
it dramatically discloses the nature of the 
Japanese militarists; their credo as a 
feudal class that the common man must be 
kept in bondage; that they are destined 
to rule the whole world; that the youth of 
the nation must be harnessed and educated 
for global conquest; and that the releasing 
of the most unspeakable manifestations 
of savagery is justified means to an end. 

The story which the picture recounts is 
of an American-educated Japanese boy 
who assimilates and finally champions the 
tenets of the ruling privileged social and 
military class; sacrifices all decency and 
honor, save to the system he embraces; and 
finally, after bearing despicable false- 
witness against the girl he professes to 
love, and against his American friends 
residing in Tokyo, meets death in the 
plane he is piloting as U. S. bombers 
blast the Japanese capital. There are 
bristling sequences of tortures and kindred 
cruelties against the American foreign 
colony and the helpless people of invaded 
China. But neither Young nor his cine- 
matic interpreters have failed to show the 
redeeming fact that the underprivileged 
citizens of Japan possess decency, and are 
the repository of potential democracy who 
will have their day when the war lords 
are finally defeated. 

Naturally the casting of the film pre- 
sented problems, but, none the less, the 
story is convincing. Margo, as the good- 
hearted daughter of a lower-class family, 
is truest to type. Tom Neal does well as 
the central male character, notwithstand- 
ing dissimilarity to a Japanese ethnologi- 
cally. J. Carrol Naish plays creditably 
the part of the liberal Japanese publisher 



"Coastal Command" 

RKO 62 Mins. 

BRITISH DOCUMENTARY FILM DE- 
PICTS WORK OF COASTAL COMMAND 
OF RAF IN SUPERB FASHION. 

The work of the Coastal Command of 
the RAF is depicted most effectively in 
this production made by the Crown Film 
Unit, producers of British war films re- 
membered gratefully for that superb docu- 
mentary, "Target for Tonight." 

The film under discussion is an ex- 
cellent documentary in which the heroism of 
the members of the Coastal Command is 
shown dramatically but without resort 
to hysterics. There is nothing in this 
film that smacks of fakery. The realiza- 
tion that everything in the production is 
real lends a "Coastal Command" a fas- 
cination that it would not have had other- 
wise. One gets an impression of cool ef- 
ficiency from observing the men of the 
Coastal Command in action. The film's 
matter-of-fact quality is one of its strong- 
est attractions. 

One cannot help but be immensely im- 
pressed at the sight of the British guardians 
of the air going quietly about their danger- 
ous every-day task of spotting submarines 
and other hostile forces that threaten 
Great Britain's lines of supply. 

Most of the footage in the film is de- 
voted to the work of the crew of a 
Sunderland flying boat in trading and put- 
ting out of action a cruiser raiding British 
shipping. The stalking of the German 
raider creates moments of high excitement. 

The identities of those who appear in 
the film are clouded in anonymity. The 
cast is made up wholly of British service 
personnel attached to the Coastal Com- 
mand of the RAF. The film was made 
under the supervision of Ian Dalrymple with 
the full co-operation of the RAF and the 
British Navy. The direction of J. B. 
Holmes is simple and direct. It is to 
be praised for permitting of no mock 
heroics. Jonah Jones' photography is 
graphic and represents a first-rate job. 



who at length commits hara-kari for his 
having so blindly espoused the cause of 
tyranny. Supporting cast is adequate, 
Edward Dmytryk's direction peppy, and 
Russell Metty's photography good. 

One of the attraction's highlights is the 
fight between Robert Ryan, an American 
athlete, and Mike Mazurki, cast as a Jap 
wrestler. Film should drag in plenty of 
coin wherever played. It has big promo- 
tional possibilities. 

CAST: Margo, Tom Neal, J. Carrol 
Naish, Robert Ryan, Gloria Holden, Don 
Douglas, George Givot, Adeline DeWalt 
Reynolds, Leonard Strong, Iris Wong, Wolf- 
gang Zilzer, Shirley Lew, Benson Fong, 
Lee Tung Foo, Mike Mazurki. 

CREDITS: Director, Edward Dmytryk; 
Author, James R. Young; Original Screen- 
play, Emmett Lavery; Cameraman, Russell 
Metry; Special Effects, Vernon L. Walker; 
Musical Director, C. Bakaleinikoff; Set 
Decorations, Darrell Silvera, Claude Car- 
penter; Art Directors, Albert S. D'Agos- 
tino, Al Herman; Recorded by James G. 
Stewart; Film Editor, Joseph Noriega; 
Assistant Director, Ruby Rosenberg. 

DIRECTION, Peppy. PHOTOGRAPHY, 
Good. 



'Bar 20' 



with William Boyd, Andy Clyde 
UA 54 MINS. 

FAST-FACED WESTERN HAS MORE 
THAN ENOUGH TO PLEASE HORSE-AND- 
SADDLE FANS. 

"Bar 20," Harry Sherman's latest addi- 
tion to the Hopalong Cassidy series, has 
more than enough to please the horse-and- 
saddle fans. Action is pretty constant 
throughout and there is plenty of excite- 
ment to keep western devotees on the alert. 

The film marks the debut of a new 
member of the trio around whom the action 
centers in the series. He is George Reeves, 
who replaces Jay Kirby. As the youthful 
member of the team, Reeves shows himself 
to be a personable fellow in his initial role 
in a Hopalong film. Once more Victor Jory 
is the chief villain, whom he plays ac- 
ceptably. The entire cast, in fact, is good, 
as westenrs go. Andy Clyde gets plenty of 
laughs, as usual. Some of the other players 
are Dustine Farnum, Douglas Fowley, Betty 
Blythe, Bob Mitchum, Francis McDonald. 

While the plot of "Bar 20" is old stuff, 
it has been developed with a world of 
punch. Jory is not suspected as being the 
crux of all the villainy until Boyd, Clyde 
and Reeves enter the picture by rescuing 
Miss Blythe and Miss Farnum, mother and 
daughter, from a group of brigands who get 
away with jewelry to be used at Miss 
Farnum's wedding to Mitchum, to whom 
the stuff belongs. Jory holds the jewelry 
for ransom in a plot to get a few acres of 
land belonging to Miss Farnum and her 
mother. Several innocent persons fall under 
suspicion, among them Mitchum and Boyd 
and his pals, before the jewels are recovered 
and everything is cleared up. 

Harry Sherman produced the film well, 
having had the benefit of capable direction 
by Lesley Selander. Morton Grant, Norman 
Houston and Michael Wilson collaborated 
on the screen play. Lewis J. Rachmil was 
associate producer. 

CAST: William Boyd, Andy Clyde, George 
Reeves, Dustine Farnum, Victor Jory, 
Douglas Fowley, Betty Blythe, Bob Mitchum, 
Francis McDonald, Earle Hodgins. 

CREDITS: Producer, Harry Sherman; Di- 
rector, Lesley Selander; Screenplay, Morton 
Grant, Norman Houston, Michael Wilson; 
Associate Producer, Lewis J. Rachmil; 
Cameraman, Russell Harlan; Art Director, 
Ralph Berger; Film Editor, Carrol Lewis; 
Sound, Jack Noyes; Set Decorator, Emil 
Kuri. 

DIRECTION, Okay. PHOTOGRAPHY, 
Fine. 



Press Safety Inspection 
Of All P. R. Pix Houses 



San Juan P. R. (By Air Mail) — 
All theaters in Puerto Rico are be- 
ing inspected from the standpoint 
of public safety by order of Lo- 
renzo J. Noa, Insular Superinten- 
dent of Insurance. 

Government inspectors already 
have visited all towns and cities be- 
longing to the districts of Humacao, 
Guayama and San Juan, where the 
largest motion picture houses are 
located. The district of Arecibo is 
about wholly inspected. Work will 
soon begin in Mayaguez, Ponce, and 
Aguadilla. 



"Petticoat Larceny" 

with Joan Carroll, Ruth Warrick 

RKO 61 Mins. 

MISS CARROLL'S YOUTHFUL APPEAL 
HELPS MAKE THIS FAIR FAMILY EN- 
TERTAINMENT; LAUGHS BOOST FJ 



lo U 



Joan Carroll's youthful charm shoulc 
much to put over this film as family en- 
tertainment in the neighborhood theaters. 
The production is a fair little comedy in 
which most of the laughs are dished out 
by a trio of crooks played by Tom Ken- 
nedy, Jimmy Conlin and Vince Barnett. 

As a child star in radio melodramas who 
rebels at her material, Miss Carroll is the 
focus of attention in this picture. The 
girl who lives with her aunt (Ruth War- 
wick), abandons home and takes up with 
Kennedy, Conlin and Barnett with the 
idea of learning how crooks really act 
and talk. Her disappearance creates a 
furor. The search for her is led by 
Walter Reed, publicist for the broadcast- 
ing company by which Miss Carroll is 
employed. Discovery of Miss Carroll's 
identity inspires an ex-convict (Paul Guil- 
foyle) to kidnap the youngster. The 
girl is rescued with the help of Kennedy, 
Conlin and Barnett, who by now have 
turned honest as a result of their asso- 
ciation with the child. Miss Carroll's 
prank has the effect of obtaining better 
material for her. Worked into the story 
is a romance between Miss Warwick and 
Reed. 

The acting is adequate for the purposes 
of a film such as this. Ben Holmes' 
direction makes for plenty of action and 
swiftness of pace. Bert Gilroy produced 
the film from a screenplay by Jack Townley 
and Stuart Palmer. 

CAST: Ruth Warwick, Joan Carroll, 
Walter Reed, Wally Brown, Tom Kennedy, 
Jimmy Conlin, Vince Barnett, Paul Guil- 
foyle, Grant Withers, Earl Dewey, Charles 
Coleman, Cliff Clark. 

CREDITS: Producer, Bert Gilroy; Director, 
Ben Holmes; Screenplay, Jack Townley, 
Stuart Palmer; Musical Score, Roy Webb; 
Musical Director, C. Bakaleinikoff; Camera- 
man, Frank Redman; Art Directors, Albert 
S. D'Agostino, Walter E. Keller; Set Decora- 
tors, Darrell Silvera, Al Fields; Sound, 
John C. Grubb; Film Editor, Harry Marker. 

DIRECTION, All Right, PHOTAGRA- 
PHY, Okay. 

"Land of Liberty" Still 
Getting Bows for Trade 

They still talk about "Land of 
Liberty," Charles Francis "Socker" 
Coe, vice-president and general coun- 
sel of MPPDA, said yesterday in 
discussing his trip to the West Coast. 

In big cities or small towns the 
story is the same; warm tribute to 
the producers who contributed the 
film, the distributors who handled it 
and the exhibitors who showed it, 
often as a purely patriotic gesture, 
according to Coe. 

"Personally," Coe added, "I think 
the saga of 'Land of Liberty' epi- 
tomizes the contribution our entire 
industry can make when exhibitors, 
producers and distributors extend a 
I joint effort." 



Wednesday, July 21, 1943 



TIC 



11 



DAILY 



Ohio Exhib. Com. to 
Tie In with L of D 



Todelo, O. — Formation of what he 
termed a "conference committee" to 
take quick action on motion pictures 
classified as "C" (condemned) by 
^N'-ional Legion of Decency head- 
ers in New York City has been 
proposed by Martin Smith, presi- 
dent of the ITO of Ohio. 

Smith said that he would appoint 
Leo T. Jones, Upper Sandusky, to 
take initial steps for the formation 
of such committees in the five dio- 
ceses of the state. Jones, a member 
of St. Peter Parish, operates the- 
aters in Upper Sandusky, Forest and 
Carey. 

The committee plan calls for or- 
ganization in each Ohio diocese of 
a group composed of Catholic lay- 
men who have no connection with 
the motion picture business, a num- 
ber of Catholic theater owners and 
a number of non-Catholic operators. 

Representation on the committee 
of theater exhibitors would provide 
te necessary connection with mo- 
tion picture distributors, Smith said. 
If the bishops were favorable, a 
diocesan representative would be in- 
vited to assist them. 

He believes that immediate action 
could be affected by such a commit- 
tee upon telegraphic receipt of C 
classifications from the national 
headquarters of the Legion of De- 
cency. He emphasized that only 
prompt notification from the Legion 
of Decency would enable the com- 
mittee to take immediate action to 
dispose of what he called "quick 
dates." 

Action of the ITO is an aftermath 
of the showing in Toledo of the C 
version of "Lady of Burlesque" by 
Loew's Valentine, Loew's Esquire, 
the Palace and the Colony. Follow- 
ing ignoring of a public protest by 
Toledo Council of Catholic Women, 
Toledo Deanery, the four theaters 
were penalized for three summer 
months by the women's organiza- 
tion. 

Jones said that the showing of 
"Lady of Burlesque" in Toledo by 
Loew's Valentine was on a quick 
date arrangement. This means, he 
said, that the United Artists office in 
Cleveland had permission to begin 
the first-run of the picture before 
cuts ordered by the Ohio Board of 
Censors could be effected. 



WB Managers to Vacation 

New Haven — Warner Theater man- 
agers from this zone vacationing 
as of July 24 include R. Mailer of 
the Strand, New Britain; E. Daley, 
Strand, Amesbury, and J. Melincoff, 
Warner, Lawrence. 



Shields' Kent to Evans 

Seattle, Wash. — Ernie Shields has 
sold the Kent theater to R. B. 
Evans, former operator of the Che- 
ney in Cheney. Shields plans a 
i lengthy vacation for his health. 



reviews of new fums 



"Heaven Can Wait" 

with Gene Tierney, Don Ameche 
20th-Fox 112 Mins. 

ACTING, PRODUCTION, TREATMENT, 
PHOTOGRAPHY MAKES THIS LUBITSCH 
COMEDY FIRST-CLASS ENTERTAIN- 
MENT. 

Everything about "Heaven Can Wait" 
points to grosses beyond the ordinary. 
Twentieth-Fox has taken extraordinary 
pains and spent lavishly to insure the pre- 
sentation to exhibitors of a film abounding 
with entertainment of the sort that stirs 
audiences to an enthusiastic pitch. 

The film is notable for a number of 
things. Chief among these are the story 
treatment, the acting, the camera work, 
the direction and the settings. The 
treatment is grown-up in keeping with the 
heme of he film. Here the Ernst Lubitsch 
influence is extremely noticeable. It mani- 
fests itself in the smart, sophisticated 
quality of the diversion — a quality that 
marks heavily the Lubitsch talent. 

The acting in this swell piece of en- 
tertainment is something to rejoice over. 
The roles have been lightly acted. Attractive 
indeed is the work of Gene Tierney and 
Don Ameche in the starring parts and 
of Charles Coburn, Spring Byington, Al- 
lyn Joslyn, Eugene Pallette, Marjorie Main, 
Laird Cregar, Signe Hasso, Louis Calhern 
and others in lesser assignments. 

One of the supreme delights of the 
film is the Technicolor photography, which 
makes "Heaven Can Wait" a great visual 
treat. Credit in this department must go 
to Edward Cronjager. 

The picture owers a tremendous debt 
to the direction of Lubitsch, who has ex- 
tracted a full measure of wit and satire 
from the Samson Raphaelson adaptation of 
the Lazlo Bus-Fekete play which forms the 
basis of the production. The Lubitsch touch 
is evident in the gay, tongue-in-cheek 
nature of the story. 

Another vital asset of the picture is its 
settings, which are rich, expensive and 
authentic-looking. Here the bow goes to 
Art Directors James Basevi and Leland 
Fuller and Set Decorator Thomas Little. 

The story takes the character played 
by Ameche from birth to death, a span 
of 70 years. It opens with Ameche apply- 
ing for admission to Hell on the strength 
of his romantic escapades. The Devil de- 
cides he is not a fit subject for Hell and 
dispatches him to Heaven. 

Lubitsch, doubling as producer, has given 
the picture a classy production. 

CAST: Gene Tierney, Don Ameche, 
Charles Coburn, Marjorie Main, Laird 
Cregar, Spring Byington, Allyn Joslyn 
Eugene Pallette, Signe Hasso, Louis Cal- 
hern, Helene Reynolds, Aubrey Mather, 
Michael Ames, Leonard Carey, Clarence 
Muse, Dickie Moore, Dickie Jones, Trudy 
Marshall, Florence Bates, Clara Blandick, 
Anita Bolster, Nino Pipitone, Jr., Claire 
Du Brey, Maureen Rodin-Ryan. 

CREDITS: Producer, Ernst Lubitsch; 
jager; Musical Score, Alfred Newman; 
Art Directors, James Basevi, Leland Fuller; 
Set Director, Thomas Little; Film Editor, 
Dorothy Spencer; Special Effects, Fred 
Sersen; Sound, Eugene Grossman, Roger 
Director, Ernst Lubitsch; Screenplay 
Samson Raphaelson; Based on play by 
Lazlo Bus-Fekte; Cameraman, Edward Cron- 
Heman. 

DIRECTION, Fine. PHOTOGRAPHY, 
Fine. 



* SHORTS * 



"The Fly In The Ointment" 

(Phantasy Cartoon) 

Columbia 7 Mins. 

Inconsequential 

Mildly diverting fare, recounting 
the tiff between a tough-guy fly, 
who finds himself caught in a fierce 
spider's web, and the occupant there- 
of. Something of an 0. Henry twist 
is injected at the finale when the fly 
is all set to devour the spider. Set 
it down as a run-of-the-mine cartoon 
without much specific interest. Oc- 
casionally the dialogue and some of 
the animation are above the dull 
level. 

"North Star" for Russ Showing 

John S. Young, personal aide to 
Admiral William H. Standley, has 
requested a print of Samuel Gold- 
wyn's "The North Star" for earliest 
possible showing to high Soviet of- 
ficials at the American Embassy in 
Moscow. Still shooting, the film will 
not be ready for release before Fall, 
at which time a print will be made 
available to Ambassador Standley. 



OWI Will Continue 
As "Clearing House" 

(Continued from Page 1) 

agencies wishing the industry to dis- 
tribute and exhibit war information 
films. A Washington dispatch to the 
contrary was published yesterday. 

A formal request from Palmer 
Hoyt, newly-appointed Director of 
the Domestic Branch of the OWI, 
arrived at WAC headquarters, sub- 
mitting the 47-minute War Depart- 
ment Technicolor film, "Report From 
the Aleutians," and requesting that 
it be made available to motion pic- 
ture theaters desiring to play it. 

Total of 194 prints of this film 
are available for theatrical use, pro- 
vided the Program Committee of the 
Theaters Division approves this 
film, which is being screened for lo- 
cal members of this committee to- 
day at 4 p.m. Members of the Dis- 
tributors Division are also attending 
this showing. 

This is the first official communi- 
cation received at WAC headquart- 
ers since Hoyt's appointment as head 
of the Domestic Branch, and marks 
a resumption of the intimate rela- 
tionship between the OWI and WAC 
which has existed since the estab- 
lishment of the OWI over a year 
ago. 



«^f" 



[ROY ROGERS TRIGGER 

\ KING OF WE COWBOYS SMARTEST HORSE IN WE MOVIES 

in 

'SONG OF 
TEXAS' 

A \ 

REPUBLIC 
PICTURE^ 




auVoMJA 

TWns 





/toot"** 



msT run 



&oop MR*, P£44fa, 




Deanna Durbin completes her romantic coming-of-age in 
"Hers to Hold/' In the process she brings untold joy to her 
admirers and promises of heavy grosses to the exhibitor. 

In her latest film Miss Durbin stands forth a fully-blossomed 
personality with a warmth, a poise and an assurance never 
before flashed by the singing star. Also evident are 
considerable growth as an actress and development along 
comedy lines that is a pleasant surprise. Pitted against 
players like Joseph Cotten and Charles Winninger, she gives 
an account of herself of which she may well be proud. The 
convincing quality of her portrayal of a rich girl in love 
with an aviator of no financial or social standing bears 
witness to the expansion of her talents." — n 



deanna DURBIN Joseph GOTTEN 




Directed by FRANK RYAN • Produced by FELIX JACKSON • Associate Producer, FRANK SHAW* 




(A 



tel, 



AHJttt 

CHARLES WINNINBEF 

Evelyn Ankers Gus Schilling 

Nel la Walker Ludwig Stosse) 

Screen Play by Lewis R. Foster 

Based on a story by John D. Klorer 



Theater Men Won't Suffer By WPB Adjustments 

THE 



Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 




{See Column 2 Below) 



-1? DAILY 



The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



ffi. 84, NO. 15 



NEW YORK, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 1943 



TEN CENTS 



REPORTJONSENT DECREE TO BE RENEWED 

Local 306 Takes Empire's Members Into the Fold 



Indie Union Continues as 
Legal Entity Until Cent- 
ury Case is Determined 

Ending 12 years of bitter labor 
strife, local 306, Operators, yester- 
day accepted into membership and 
merged with the Empire State Mo- 
tion Operators Union, a New York 
State chartered indie organization. 
Local 306 added the 234 men of the 
Empire to its membership of 2,155. 
Formal exchange of documents end- 
ing the long labor battle were made 
in the office and witnessed by Mayor 
F. H. LaGuardia. 

With the merger 100% union- 
(Continued on Page 6) 

Harold Field Adds 
Six Iowa Theaters 



Des Moines, la. — In one of the big- 
gest theater deals in Iowa during 
recent years, the Harold D. Field in- 
terests of St. Louis Park, Minn., pur- 
shased six houses in the state. 

The deal included the Lake, Tracy 
and Vista theaters at Storm Lake, 
owned by George Norman, and the 

{Continued on Page 9) 



Ecuadorean Rep. Lauds 
Industry's War Job 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — The motion picture in- 
dustry is doing a great job toward 
ouilding better understanding be- 
tween all members of the United Na- 

(Continued on Page 7) 



WFA Bans AAA Use 
of Motion Pictures 

Washington Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — "Preparing, dis- 
tributing or exhibiting motion pic- 
tures" is prohibited under a gag 
placed on the 200,000 State and 
County employes and committeemen 
of the Agricultural Administration 
Agency by the War Food Adminis- 
tration. The gag prevents discus- 
sion by the AAA agents of the 
Government's farm programs. 



Tele. Ready For 

Post War Market 

Television receivers in any de- 
sired size, with screens from six 
to 24 inches wide, will be available 
as soon as it is possible to recon- 
vert radio manufacturing plants after 
the war, Ralph R. Beal, research 
director of RCA said yesterday. 
"Unquestionably," he commented 
"television receiving sets will be 
within the range of the average 
pocketbook and we expect to be 
able to do a good job of program- 
ming without too many awkward 
growing pains." Beal noted that it 
is impractical to name the price 
range of television receivers at this 
time. 



Kuykendall Unworried 
By WPB Reorg. 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — Confidence in the 
continuation of amicable and mutual- 
ly helpful relations between WPB 
and American theater owners was 
predicted yesterday by Ed Kuyken- 
dall, MPTOA head, in Washington 
in order to keep apprised of the 

{Continued on Page 6) 



Polio Epidemic Increases 
Throughout Texas Area 



Dallas — With polio cases increas- 
ing and new points of incidence re- 
ported daily, theater box-offices in 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Several Changes to be Embodied in the Provisions 
Of Decree After Nov. 20, According to Report; No 
Indication as to Effect of Exhib. Recommendations 

Renewal of the consent decree in the New York equity case 
with several changes in its provisions looms as the assured 
procedure after Nov. 20, it was reported reliably yesterday. 

While there has been no official an- 
nouncement as to the Department of 
Justice's intentions, sources close to 
the situation have indicated that the 
decree will be continued. 

What the changes in the decree 
will be have not been disclosed, but 
it is understood that some revisions 
in the arbitration system are on the 
docket. A thorough study of the 

(Continued mi Page 9) 



Metro Seb Up New 
Exhib. Aid Program 



M-G-M has no desire to roll up 
profits at the expense of exhibitor 
losses, Howard Dietz, director of 
promotion, said yesterday in com- 
menting on the company's decision to 
set aside $125,000 to be used for 
exploitation and promotional aids 
for its customers in adversely af- 
fected areas. Decision was made at 
the recent two-day conference of 
sales executives, district managers 
and publicity and advertising repre- 
sentatives. 

Small town theater men whose 

(Continued on Page 5) 



Para. Sets Sales Record 
With Single Block of Pix 

Paramount established an all-time 
sales record on a single block of pic- 
tures during the last three weeks 
when 3,202 independent contracts 
were signed for the sixth and last 
group for 1942-43, Neil Agnew, gen- 
eral sales manager, announced yes- 
terday. This is more than double 
the previous high mark established 
on the fifth group, he said. 

Each individual week of Block 6 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Sees Larger Far East Market 

War Giving Better Knowledge of U. S. 



Urges Stricter Policing 
Of Ail-Night Theaters 



Detroit — A strong recommendation 
for better policing of all-night the- 
aters, especially along Woodward 
Ave. follows the first inquiry into 
(Continued on Page 8) 



Developments born of the war will 
have the effect of improving the Far 
East tremendously as a market for 
American film product, it was pre- 
dicted yesterday by Nick Perry, Co- 
lumbia's managing director for Aus- 
tralia and New Zealand and super- 
visor for the Far East, who is on 

(Continued on Page 7) 



rr 



Aleutian" Okay No 
Tip to OWI's Policy 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — Palmer Hoyt, OWI 
Domestic Director, said yesterday 
that his approval of the long version 
of the Army's "Report from the 
Aleutians" for public showing des- 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Chaplin Suing Selznick, 
Others on 20th-Fox Deal 



Institution of a suit by Charles 
Chaplin, in his own behalf and that 
of all United Artists stockholders, 
against David O. Selznick, UA, 20th- 

(Continued on Page 9) 



Visions Expanded 

Australian Field 

Post war possibilities for American 
films in Australia yesterday were de- 
scribed as "immense" by Nick Perry, 
Columbia managing director for Aus- 
tralia and New Zealand. He noted 
that patronage is now so good he 
fears a saturation point is being 
reached in view of the duration ban 
on new theater building. Perry sees 
no reason to believe that Australia 
will not defreeze American film 
funds as have other British Empire 
nations. 



TO* 



WW 

DAILY 



Thursday, July 22, 1943 




Vol. 84, No. 15 Thurs., July 22, 1943 lOCents 
JOHN W. ALICOATE : : : Publisher 

DONALD M. MERSEREAU : General Manager 



CHESTER B. BAHN :::::: Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year: 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address: 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco-Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 

Copyright, 1943, by THE FILM DAILY 
(Wid's Films and Film Folk) 



FINANCIAL 



(Wednesday, July 21) 



NEW YORK STOCK 

High 

Am. Seat 

Col. Picts. vtc. <2'/ 2 %> I8I/4 

Columbia Picts. pfd 

Con. Fm. Ind 2% 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd.. . 17 

East. Kodak 167 

do pfd 

Cen. Prec. Eq 21 S/ 8 

Loew's, Inc 62% 

Paramount 29 



MARKET 

Net 
Low Close Chg. 



I8I/4 181/4 + % 

'i% "vk :\::: 

167/ 8 17 +l/ 4 

67 167 — i/ 2 



RKO 



9% 



RKO $6 pfd 93 

20th Century-Fox . . 23 1/2 
20th Century-Fox pfd. 33% 

Univ. Pict. pfd 

Warner Bros 15 

do pfd 

NEW YORK BOND 

Para. B'way. 3s55 

Para. Picts. deb. 4s56 

Warner Bros. dbs. 6s48 

NEW YORK CURB 

Monogram Picts 3% 

RKO War 1% 

Sonotone Corp 3% 

Technicolor 15% 

Trans-Lux 



21% 215/ 8 + i/ 4 

623/ 8 623/ 4 + % 

281/2 29 + 1/2 

91/s 93/ 8 

92 93 — 1/2 

231/s 231/2 

33i/ 2 335/s + i/s 



14% 147/ 8 
MARKET ' 



MARKET 

31/2 31/2 

1% 1% 

3% 37/ 8 

H3/4 147/ B 



MANPOWER 

YES, WE BELIEVE WE CAN 
SUPPLY GRADED MANPOWER 
TO FILL ANY VACANCY IN 
YOUR ORGANIZATION. 

CALL— 

FRANK McGRANN 

POSITION SECURING BUREAU, IN.C 

(Agency) 
331 Madison Ave. (43rd St.), New York 

MUrray hill 2-6494 



cominc (MD G0MG 



CHARLES BETHELL, manager and operator of 
the Cinema Savoy, Nassau, Bahamas, is in Miami 
looking up bookings. 

HARRY COHN starts back to the Coast to- 
morrow. 

PETER COLLI, Warners Central American 
supervisor, is in New York from Havana. 

ARTHUR SACHSON, Warners' assistant gen- 
eral sales manager returned yesterday from the 
Coast. BEN KALMENSON and other home office 
execs who attended the regional sales meeting 
in San Francisco are making stopovers on the 
way East. 

IRVING BERLIN arrived in New York yesterday 
afternoon by plane from the Coast -to be on 
hand for the world premiere of his Warner 
film, "This is the Army." 

STEVE . BROIDY, Monogram vice-prexy, and 
N. EDWARD MOREY left yesterday for Boston; 
they will return to New York early next week. 

PETE ROSIAN is here from Cincinnati. 

JOE WALSH, RKO Pathe director, has re- 
turned to his desk from Indianapolis where he 
shot scenes at the Riviera Swimming Club for 
a subsequent "Sportscope." 

MATT SAUNDERS, Poli, Bridgeport manager, 
is off for a vacation in Chicago. 

LOUIS B. MAYER and HOWARD STRICK- 
LINC are expected to arrive here from the 
Coast over the week-end. 



ERNST LUBITSCH leaves the Coast tomorrow 
for New York. 

NORMAN ELSON returns tomorrow from 
Washington. 

FORTUNAT BARONAT goes to Hollywood to- 
morrow. 

NORMAN AYERS, Eastern district manager for 
Warners, was in New York yesterday conferring 
with Arthur Sachson, Jules Lapidus and other 
home office executives. 

HARRY CRAHAM is in town from Atlanta. 

W. F. RCDCERS returns from Chicago tomor- 
row. 

HOWARD DIETZ, SI SEADLER and BILLY 
FERGUSON arrived from Chicago yesterday. 

E. M. SAUNDERS, E. K. O'SHEA, A. F. 
CUMMINGS, EDDIE AARON and HAROLD POST- 
MAN return to New York today. 

H. M. RICHEY comes in from Washington to- 
morrow. 

WILLIAM J. GERMAN, vice-president and 
treasurer of J. E. Brulatour, Inc., left yesterday 
for Rochester. 

IRVINC DOLLINGER and his wife are on a 
Canadian lake cruise. 

HARRY LOWENSTEIN is vacationing at 
Schroon Lake. 



Republic Opens Studio 
Sales Conference Today 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Republic's third and 
final sales meeting in company's 
current series opens today at the 
studio, with sessions concluding to- 
morrow night. Herbert J. Yates, 
Sr., President James R. Grainger, 
Western District Sales Manager F. 
A. Bateman, and exchange-men from 
this district will participate in dis- 
cussions similarly to those recently 
held in New York and Chicago. 

Among chief topics will be the 
new season's product, promotion 
plans for future deluxe attractions, 
and the continuing promotional sup- 
port accorded to Roy Rogers, with 
emphasis on standout success of the 
campaign in Chicago. 

Following exchange reps, will at- 
tend the meetings today and tomor- 
row: Franchise Holder J. T. Shef- 
field, Northwest territory; Branch 
Managers F. M. Higgins, Seattle; 
J. H. Sheffield, Portland; Gene Ger- 
base, Denver; H. C. Fuller, Salt 
Lake City; John Frey, Los Angeles; 
and Sid Weisbaum, San Francisco. 

William Saal and Charles Reed 
Jones of the home office are attend- 
ing the studio meeting also. 



"Stormy Weather" Opens Big 

"Stormy Weather," 20th-Fox mus- 
ical, yesterday opened at the Roxy 
and the Alhambra, uptown, to rec- 
ord crowds, it was announced by 
Tom Connors, vice-president in 
charge of sales. At the Roxy, the 
opening day figure equalled that of 
"Coney Island," company's biggest 
grosser to date. 



Twins Die at Birth 

Bridgeport, Conn. — Vincent Pal- 
meri, manager of the Merritt, Bridge- 
port, lost his twin sons at birth. 



Morrison Cites "Progress' 
On Departure for Coast 



Charles Morrison, who recently 
journeyed to New York in the inter- 
ests of setting up his own motion 
picture producing outfit with James 
J. Walker as its president, declared 
last night as he left with Mrs. 
Morrison on their return trip to 
Hollywood that progress has been 
made with reference to his project. 

He denied reports current in trade 
circles that he is talking a specific 
association deal with any one major 
distribution outfit, and indicated that 
details essential to such a move 
have not been completed by him. 
"There are many considerations re- 
maining to be settled,' Morrison 
said, "such as literary and other 
properties, directors, writers, etc., 
and it will take two months, and 
possibly more, for me to set up these 
and additional organization angles." 

Walker, he pointed out, has definite 
commitments to fulfill before he 
could take over firm's helm. "In 
the meanwhile," he added, "we will 
coast along putting plans in shape." 



Hughes Detroit House 
Set for Aug. 15 Bow 



Detroit — Opening date of Aug. 15 
has been tentatively set by Howard 
Hughes, for the Downtown theater. 
The 2,000-seat first-run house has 
been dark six years. Re-seating is 
being completed this week, and total 
cost of remodeling will run about 
$60,000. 

House will use stage shows, in 
addition to independent or other 
film product, George McCall, How- 
ard Hughes' representative, dis- 
closed here. Opening run of "The 
Outlaw" is expected to run eight to 
10 weeks, followed by the stage 
show policy. 



AGVA to Discuss 20% 
Tax With Treasury 

Steps to lighten the burden placed 
upon the variety artist by the pres- 
ent application of the 20 per cent 
withholding tax are being sought by 
the American Guild of Variety Ar- 
tists. To this end executives of the 
Guild will visit Washington to dis- 
cuss the situation with the Treasury 
Department. AGVA will sug r ' +. 
that the variety performer be 
mitted to deduct immediate and cur- 
rent expenses incurred on any en- 
gagement before deduction of the 
withholding levy. 

AGVA's contention is that it is 
unfair to deduct the 20 per cent tax 
from a performer's gross salary 
without first making provision for 
agent's commissions and other dis- 
bursements the variety artist is com- 
pelled to make by the nature of his 
work. 



NEW YORK 
THEATERS 



RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL 

ROCKEFELLER CENTER 
CARY GRANT 

"MR. LUCKY" 

With LARAINE DAY 

AN RKO RADIO PICTURE 

Gala Stage Revue Symphony Orchestra 

First Mezzanine Seats Reserved. Circle 6-4600 



Lena HORNE Bill ROBINSON 
Cab CALLOWAY 
and his band 



sm&#. 



& 



# 



A 



20th CENTUDY FOX PICTURE 



P O X Y 7<h **•■ 



STAGE SHOW 



"DIXIE" • 1- Person 

with * ANDREWS SISTERS 

BING CROSBY "fr TIM HERBERT 

DOROTHY LAMOUR ir MITCH AYRES 

A Paramount Picture -ykr and his orchestra 

Cool PARAMOUNT Times Square 



EJUS 



B'WAY & 
47th St. 



"FALCON IN DANGER" 

TOM CONWAY . JEAN BROOKS 
— and — 

"SQUADRON LEADER— X" 

ANN DVORAK • ERIC PORTMAN 



l^s STATE 



ON SCREEN 

"WHAT'S 
BUZZIN' 
COUSIN" 

ANN MILLER 

ROCHESTER 

First N. Y. Showing 



IN PERSON 
'SLAPSIE' 

MAX IE 
ROSENBLOOM 





pffc- 




//o-ttf afi-d pcuu[ 



The Baer facts (artist Howard Baer oi Esquire Magazine did it). It's his inspiration of the Du Barry Girl 
after seeing Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's Technicolorful Musical Comedy, "DU BARRY WAS A LADY." 










- -»*.;, i 









Let's Keep 
Seeing Bonds.' 






r? J 



■ :*-■.■ ' 



^»- - "* »f* 



.*• 



'» 



.11 



starring 



• GENE ^%to 
TO HHY 

^ -*-^ . ..:„„ Brecher * 



*»» 



A.daP' a,ion bV 
DeSvtva ne Svlva • W A„MwYn- Maver 

ROY DEL 1 

J T U 



Thursday, July 22, 1943 



rnu 

DAILY 



Metro Sets Up New 
Exhib. Aid Program 



(Continued from Page 1) 

patrons have moved to large cities 
and defense areas admittedly have 
suffered a business slump, and 
M-G-M's $125,000 appropriation will 
enable them to show aggressiveness 
in attracting the people they have 
fefiL Dietz said. M-G-M, Dietz added, 

"prepared to give the same atten- 
njn to the small theaters propor- 
tionately that it gives to the big 
key city first-runs. 

The two-day meeting crystallized 
the announcement previously made 
that M-G-M intended to price its 
product to its customers on a basis 
to meet present-day conditions. 

W. F. Rodgers told the meeting 
that of the 10 pictures to comprise 
the block, available in September, 
three will be in Technicolor; namely, 
"Salute to the Marines," "Lassie 
Come Home" and "Best Foot For- 
ward." Others in the group will be 
"Above Suspicion," "Whistling in 
Brooklyn," "Young Ideas," "Swing 
Shift Maisie,' "Sabotage Agent," 
"Girl Crazy' and "Dr. Gillespie's 
Criminal Case." 

The short subject program will 
consist of 16 one-reel cartoons, 14 
one-reel Pete Smith Specialties, 12 
one-reel FitzPatrick TravelTalks, 10 
one-reel M-G-M All-Stars, four two- 
reel specials including "Crime Does 
Not Pay" subjects and 104 issues of 
"News of the Day." 

Rodgers announced that the week- 
ly payment plan on short subjects 
had been discontinued. 



U Sponsors Workers Club 

Sponsored by Universal, the "We 
Make 'Em— He Flies 'Em Club" was 
officially launched last night. Fifty 
women, mothers or wives of men who 
are flyers in the armed services, were 
the guests of Universal at a dinner 
at the Astor Hotel. Each of the 
women is a worker in an airplane 
factory. Club was inspired by Dean- 
na Durbin's new picture, "Hers to 
Hold." 



Bob Snyder Joins Dezel 

Detroit — Bob Snyder, formerly city 
salesman for PRC, is joining Al De- 
zel Roadshows, distributors of Film 
Classics, as a partner in the Michi- 
gan distributing company. He will 
also be branch manager here for 
Dezel. 




Dan Totheroh Norman 

Fernando Mendez 



Moray 




'Nother Movie Miscellany: 

• • • OUT Hollywood way, Nicholas Bela, encouraged by success 
of his one-act blood chilling comedy, which had a successful run at the 

Belasco Theater, is polishing a three-act play for Fall production 

'Tis a comedy with hair-raising trimmings, titled "Mountain Fervor". . . . 

• That was a swell article by Ed Van Olinda in the Albany Times- 
Union on Oscar Perrin, dean of the city's theatermen, who is celebrating 
his second anniversary as manager of WB's Delaware Theater there 

Oscar, tremendously popular in the Capital City area, has been 

active in show biz for 43 years. ... • Here's one that will even stick 

hell out of the Quiz Kids: Who was the distinguished managing 

editor of a certain trade publication, published at 1225 Vine St., Phila- 
delphia, who sat on Sam Wood's left hand throughout the recent lunch- 
eon tendered by Paramount to the famed director in the Hotel Astor? 

Managing editor's initials are "H. M." Clues: Was it (1) 

Harry Mandell, (2) Herb Morgan, (3) Herb Miller, or (4) Henry Morgen- 

thau? For the first correct answer, Phil M. will give a pass to an 

OWI short, or to a sneak preview of a trailer 

T T T 

• • • IT'S a hot contest among the local younger generation for 
those 37 passes which the Century. Circuit is giving to the kids who 
sell the most War Stamps this month in the current Shangri-La 
drive. . . . • Dear Messrs. Exhibitors: Why don't you urge the 
British Information Services to release, "Silent Village," made by the 

Crown Film Unit as a memorial to the people of Lidice It's 

aces. ... • In Detroit, which only a few weeks ago made headlines 
with its shameful race riots, "Ox-Bow Incident" has done a terrific biz 

at the Adams Theater It's 20th Fox's second highest grosser at 

the Strand Record is held by "Chetniks". ... • July Lion's 

Roar," commemorating Leo's 19th anniversary, tops by a mile all 
previous issues in content, makeup and interest, and is a credit to 

Howard Dietz, his promotional lads, and the entire M-G-M org 

One of the many intriguing features deals with Toy Garnett, director 

of "Bataan" Toy's experience some time back with Jap duplicity 

is recounted as follows "I experienced Nip deception in Yokohama. 
I had just purchased the latest model American movie camera for the 
trip (to Japan). While going through customs it mysteriously dis- 
appeared. We searched everywhere. Finally we cornered the head 
inspector and blasted a few choice American expletives. The Nip was 
like granite. He was 'so solly' but the camera had been locked up by 
mistake and the man who knew the combination had left. We dashed 
quickly to the Foreign Ministry, quickly, brushed aside overly polite 
but determined assistants, and demanded our camera. The head man 
spoke perfect, polished English and was very sorry, too. They were 
celebrating Neiu Year's, he pointed out, and it would last five days. 
There was nothing he or we could do. Five days later the camera 
was returned. We immediately set it up to film some scenes. But 
when we started the motor, there was a grinding of gears. We knew the 
camera had been in perfect shape as we had checked it completely 
before docking. We soon realized what had happened. No two parts 
were in their right places, and pieces of wax mold were still clinging 
to several wheels. The Japs had made a duplicate of it but couldn't 
get it back together right." ... • When James R. Young, author of 
"Behind the Rising Sun," on which is based RKO Radio's potent pro- 
duction of the same title, starts his radio tour 'round the nation in 
behalf of the pic, U. S. citizens will hear plenty on the subject of Nip 
duplicity, and sterner stuff, too It will aid in making millions. 

T T T 

AVENGE PEARL HARBOR! 



IN NEW POSTS 



A. D. CILMERE, manager, Lyric, Boonville, Mo. 

(AMES O. MARTIN, manager, Auditorium, Mar- 
shall, Mo. 
DICK WRIGHT, manager, Electric, Springfield, 

Mo. 
RAY McLAIN, city manager, Fox Midwest, Jop- 

lin, Mo. 
H. D. CARROLL, city manager, Fox Midwest, 

Coffeyville, Kan. 
DALE THORNHILL, city manager, Fox Midwest, 

Archinson, Kan. 
WOODY HILSBECK, city manager, Fox Midwest, 

lola, Kan. 
CHARLES MOHLER, manager, People's, Chanute, 

Kan. 
JAMES O. KENT, salesman, PRC, Detroit. 

Northwestern Exhibs. 
Want Singles Back 

Portland, Ore. — A return to sin- 
gle feature programs was favored 
by a majority of exhibitors attend- 
ing meetings in Seattle and Port- 
land sponsored by the Pacific Coast 
Conference of Independent Theater 
Owners and conducted by Rotus 
Harvey, chairman of the board of 
trustees. 

A large number of exhibitors at 
both sessions indicated that if the 
affiliated circuits would take the lead 
in a move to single bills, the indepen- 
dents would follow suit. They ex- 
pressed the belief that any shortage 
of product might be relieved by a 
universal policy of single features 
plus a variety of shorts. 

The Seattle and Portland sessions 
were the first of a series to be held 
in this territory. Others will be held 
this month in San Francisco and Los 
Angeles. 



Mills Novelty Co. Will 
Switch Corporate Name 



Chicago — Mills Novelty Co., manu- 
facturer of "Soundies" and other 
theater equipment, will change its 
name to Mills Industries. Fred L. 
Mills stays as president of the new 
company, while Ralph J. Mills, Den- 
nis W. Donohue and Gordon B. Mills 
are vice-presidents, Herbert S. Mills, 
treasurer, and Hayden R. Mills, sec- 
retary. Change in corporate name 
takes effect Sept. 1. 

Company now has 2,000 employes, 
with the three plants engaged whol- 
ly in war work. 



Fourth Gold Star on 
Disney Service Flag 

West Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — A fourth gold star 

was added to the Walt Disney studio 

service flag when word was received 

that Tech. Sergt. Burdette 
fe^ Sykora, 29, a former Disneyite 
KS^ and son of Mr. and Mrs. John 

Sykora of Windom, Minn., was 
killed in action in the North Pacific 
area on Memorial Day. He was 
believed to have been in the battle 
of Attu Island. 



mv- 



m 



DAILY 



Thursday, July 22, 1943 



ff 



Aleutian" Okay No 
Tip to OWI's Policy 



(Continued from Page 1) 
pite his admitted belief the shorter 
version would be a better picture 
for the public, must be considered 
as an "incident apart." 

"It does not indicate future OWI 
policy," Hoyt said. 

"We don't intend to abrogate any 
of our rights in regard to the re- 
lease to the public of any films from 
Government agencies," he insisted, 
and added that he thought the pre- 
sentation of his decision in The Film 
Daily (July 20) did not create the 
right impression. That interpreta- 
tion was based largely upon a tele- 
phone conversation with Hoyt on 
July 16, in which he said the decision 
he would make would be of im- 
portance in regard to future OWI 
authority over release of Army pix 
for public showings. He said yester- 
day that he had probably created the 
wrong impression during that con- 
versation. 

Hoyt insisted that his decision had not 
been made in the face of Army pressure — 
"except for a flat statement from General 
Surles" to the effect that Army would re- 
lease only the longer version of the film. 

The former Oregon publisher insisted that 
the shorter version, two reels as against 
four, is the proper one for public distri- 
bution. Lowell Mellett had "very properly" 
insisted the two reelers be offered he said, 
and Hoyt agreed with him. "But just be- 
cause the Army was stubborn that's no 
reason we should be." he added. 

The argument, he said, was actually about 
circulation, for there is "nothing: in the 
policy of content of the film to which we 
could object." 

Hoyt said it was extremely difficult for a 
new man to step into a situation as far 
along as was this one. The controversy 
regarding release of the picture was on for 
several weeks before Hoyt came to OWI 
late last month. "We should have refused the 
long version long ago." he said. 

Hoyt said in conclusion that al- 
though OWI offers the 45 minute 
version to the WAC, "we shall con- 
tinue to press for the release of a 
shorter version as well, to the end 
that the greatest possible number 
of people may be able to see the 
picture." 

Salgada Sees "Air Power" 

A private showing of Walt Dis- 
ney's "Victory Through Air Power," 
was given at the UA prevue room 
yesterday for Dr. Joaquim Pedro Sal- 
gada, Minister of Aeronautics of 
Brazil. 



Local 306-Empire in Merger 

La Guard ia Witnesses Exchange of Documents 



WEDDING BELLS 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Betzi Beaton, actress 
will be married this week to Richard 
Ainley, actor at present in the 
service. The ceremony will be per- 
formed in Gadsen, Ala., where Ain- 
ley is stationed. 



Des Moines, Ia. — Sergt. Woodrow 
W. Sherrill, former office manager 
for M-G-M exchange, was married 
to Mary Ann Green here. Sherrill 
is stationed at Camp Van Dorn, 
Miss. 



(Continued 

zation of booths here under the 
IATSE banner shape's up on 
the industry horizon. Next move 
by Local 306, it is understood, 
will be to seek to merge several 
indie groups of projectionists, 
such as United and Independent. 
Latter groups as a rule com- 
prise some 12 or 15 operators. 
As a result of yesterday's merg- 
er, Local 306's sway spans about 
700 theaters, of which 90 were 
on Empire's list. 

Principal signers of the agree- 
ment of ratification were Herman 
Gelber, President of Local 306 and 
Abraham Kindler, President of the 
Empire State Union. Other wit- 
nessing signatures were those of 
Father John P. Boland, former chair- 
man of the State Labor Relations 
Board and License Commissioner 
Paul Moss, both of whom played an 
important part in bringing officials 
of the two unions together. Local 
306 and Empire yesterday conferred 
an honorary life membership on 
Moss in recognition of his services. 
Mayor LaGuardia, familiar 
with the situation, congratulated 
both groups on their "intelligent 
and progressive leaderships" and 
urged them to raise the stand- 
ard of motion picture projection 
in New York City. 
The term of the agreement ratified 
in the Mayor's office provide that 
all members of Empire immediately 
join 306. This was done at a special 
membership meeting held yester- 
day morning in Manhattan Center. 
The agreement further provides that 
all officers of Empire resign and 
that the officers of 306 be elected 
officers of Empire. This was done 



from Page 1) 

at a special midnight meeting of the 
Empire Union held early yesterday 
morning at the Claridge Hotel. 

This procedure was adopted in view of 
the fact that the original proposals for the 
immediate dissolution of Empire had been 
stymied by a temporary injunction issued 
by Judge William C. Wilson in Kings County 
Supreme Court July 8. The injunction was 
obtained by Century Circuit, a corporation 
owning 27 theaters and employing more 
than 100 Empire Union men. 

Empire Finally to Fold 
Thus to satisfy the temporary injunction. 
Empire stays alive as a legal entity until 
the case is decided by the Courts and the 
members of Empire will hold dual mem- 
bership but for all practical purposes the 
two organizations are one and it is ex- 
pected that Empire will be finally dissolved 
after the case is decided. 

Empire's contract with Century Cir- 
cuit has eight years to run. Union in 
the future will move to re-open it an- 
nually until it expires. Empire's con- 
tracts with other houses run for a 
year or two years. Some pay boosts 
are foreseen as a result of the merger, 
with a gradual raising of wage scales 
for indie houses anticipated. 
Observers yesterday saw the merger hold- 
ing distinct benefits for the theater fields 
here. It was pointed out that it assured 
the house operator an opportunity to fully 
appraise his labor market from year to 
year and that it stood as a bar to juris- 
dictional disputes with their inevitable pick- 
eting, etc. 

Strife Marked by Strikes 
Behind the obvious fact of the merger is 
a history of 12 years of labor strife which 
heavily affected the New York movie theater 
going public. Strikes and counter-strikes, 
pickets and counter-pickets were common. 
Thousands of arrests of pickets were made 
during this period and the theater going 
public was made thoroughly aware of the 
battle between the two unions. Countless 
efforts were made to bring the two or- 
ganizations together, but all failed. 

The final successful effort was initiated 
by Father Boland, then head of the State 
Labor Relations Board, when numerous 
cases involving the two unions were filed with 
the board. 



"Canteen" Getting Heavy 
Dough In Cleveland Area 



Cleveland — "Stage Door Canteen" 
is doing phenomenal business all 
through this territory, according to 
local UA officials. Here, the pic 
broke a 22-year house precedent with 
a three-week engagement at Loew's 
State during which time it also 
smashed the house attendance rec- 
ords. Pic then moved to the Still- 
man for another house-breaking rec- 
ord. Other runs were three weeks 
at Loew's Akron; two weeks in 
Youngstown; two weeks in Steuben- 
ville and sixteen days in Mansfield. 

Morrison Orr, UA branch man- 
ager, reports that "Stage Door Can- 
teen" has been bought by practical- 
ly all local independent theater cir- 
cuits. 



Warner Talks "Army" Plans 

Jack L. Warner met yesterday af- 
ternoon in the company's home of- 
fice with the Women's Division of 
the First Nighters Committee of 
Irving Berlin's "This is the Army." 
They discussed plans for world pre- 
miere of the Warner-Army Relief 
production next Wednesday night at 
the Hollywood Theater. 



Para. Sets Sales Record 
With Single Block of Pix 

(Continued from Page 1) 

selling has set a record for a block, 
Agnew said, pointing out that inde- 
pendent contracts obtained the first 
week totalled 1,045, going up to 1,313 
in the second week and 844 for the 
third week. 

The sixth block includes "So Proud- 
ly We Hail," "Dixie," "Henry Aid- 
rich Swings It," "Alaska Highway" 
and "Submarine Alert.' 



Ira Becksted Funeral 
Services in Cleveland 



Cleveland — Funeral services were 
held yesterday for Ira Becksted, a 
32d degree Mason and for 25 years 
projectionist at the Jennings The- 
ater. Becksted held one of the first 
cards issued by the Local 160, 
IATSE. He is survived by his wife 
and a son, Warren. 

He was one of the founders of the 
Cleveland Film Workers Union, fore- 
runner of Local 160, IATSE and was 
a member of the AF of L's American 
Society of Cinematographical Engi- 
neers. 



Kuykendall Unworried 

ByWPBReorg. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

changes now going on within WPB 
as they affect the industry. 

An order already signed shifts the- 
ater services from the Service 
Equipment Division of WPB to the 
Office of Civilian Requirements, but 
does not shift the authority ov- 
the manufacturing of equipment ( 
repair parts nor the authority ovci 
operation of supply houses. Full 
effect of the change is not yet ap- 
parent, Kuykendall said, but he im- 
plied that there was no great cause 
for worry ' as things now seem to 
shape up. 

"The theater owners of America 
feel that any changes or adjustments 
that may occur in WPB will be be- 
cause of the necessity for taking a 
load off of some that may have had 
more than they can reasonably at- 
tend to," said Kuykendall. "We feel 
reasonably sure that the men direct- 
ing the force of WPB will keep in 
mind the necessity for having one 
at the head of the amusement divis- 
ion, though which the theaters are 
operated, that understands our me- 
chanics. While no definite changes 
have yet been proclaimed publicly, 
we feel that there will be a change 
in the immediate future and that in 
all probability the theater owners 
will suffer no hardship because of 
it." Kuykendall added that he, as 
MPTOA head, "has complete confi- 
dence in the administrative officers 
of WPB." 



Reachi "Blacklisted" 
By Cuban Film Board 



Havana (By Air Mail, Passed by 
Censor) — The Cuban Film Board of 
Trade (independent distributors) has 
notified the Association of Mexican 
Motion Picture Producers and Dis- 
tributors that it will not negotiate 
with that association as long as San- 
tiago Reachi is president. 

Measure was taken by the Board 
following several unsuccessful efforts 
by it, and by Dr. Carriedo Galban, 
president of the Banco Cinematogra- 
fico of Mexico, to come to an agree- 
ment in the controversy which arose 
when Reachi signed a contract with 
RKO for the distribution of "The 
Three Musketeers." 



Italians Hold Perry 
Ex-Disney Arranger 

West Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — First Lieut. Herbert 
Perry, a navigator in the U. S. Army 
Air Force, and a former Disney music 
arranger, parachuted from a dis- 
abled Flying Fortress but was cap- 
tured by the Italians and removed 
to Venice during the invasion of 
Sicily on July 5. He is the husband 
of the former Nora Cocreham, secre- 
tary in the Disney Cutting Depart- 
ment. 



Thursday, July 22, 1943 



iw 



k DAILY 



Synthetic Hootch Spurs Vandalism in Maritimes 



Rowdies, Drunk on Lemon 
Extract and "Jakey," Go 
Wild, Wreck Houses 



Halifax, N. S. — Exhibitors are the 
innocent bystanders who get the 
works by reduced liquor rations and 
liquor store sales hours. When 
■T-y e was no limit on what anybody 
"Id buy, and with the package 
s\ores open about 14 hours each 
week-day, theater owners and staffs 
complained of the practice of bring- 
ing filled bottles into the the thea- 
ters, consuming the contents and 
then throwing the bottles on the 
floor, against walls, or into toilets 
or wash bowls. But, that was very 
mild compared to conditions today 
in the Maritimes. 

Lemon and vanilla extracts, Ja- 
maica ginger, face lotions and liquid 
shoe polishes, are being used on a 
wholesale basis, as substitutes for 
liquor. Men, women, boys and girls 
i carry them into theaters, and not 
only create annoyance and disorder 
after consuming the synthetic bever- 
ages, but smash the bottles on car- 
pets, tile, woodwork, mirrors, plas- 
ter, and in the toilet and wash bowls 
and urinals, causing untold damage 
to equipment, fixtures and furnish- 
ings. 

Broken glass is scattered about 
carpets and ground into the floor 
coverings by footwear. Leatherette 
and metal in the seats are ruined 
and drapes are torn. Large, orna- 
mental mirrors in rest rooms are 
broken or cracked, when competi- 
tions are held to see who can do 
the most damage. 

Screens and curtains also have 
been used as targets. In one case, 
employes of a theater picked up suf- 
ficient refuse that had gone through 
the screen, curtain, drapes, etc., to 
fill a barrel. Hoodlums express 
their dislike of screen characters by 
tossing or throwing bottles at the 
screen images. 

The police seem to be little inter- 
ested in the sale of the substitutes 
for beverage purposes. Under the 
law, the extracts and ginger can be 
sold legally only for cooking. Now, 
they can be bought by the dozen 
bottles, and the manufacturers, 
wholesalers and retailers are sell- 
ing them at a volume never before 
known, and demanding prices from 
100 to 500 per cent higher than for- 
merly. After each night, the wreck- 
age, not only in the rest rooms but 
in the body of a theater, is creating 
much concern. 



WAR SERVICE 

. . . on the Film Front 



Vandalism "Bull" Is Taken by Proverbial 

Longhorns via Texas Circuit's IVeu? Campaign 

Dallas — Interstate houses here have joined civic and school authorities to 
curtail vandalism generally, and particularly in theaters. Stands will "up" illumin- 
ation, double staffs in some instances, and install special officers. House staffs 
will be trained to function most effectively for individual situation, as well as 
being grounded in the over-all purpose. Appeals will be made to public via screen 
trailers, pointing out difficulty in procuring new equipment and replacing dam- 
age. Stress will also be placed upon the public's interest in first-class service. 
James 0. Cherry, Dallas City Manager, has made the plans and handled details. 



Sees Larger Far East Market 

War Giving Better Knowledge of U. S. 



(Continued from Page 1) 



his first visit to the States in two 
years. 

Perry revealed that Columbia was 
laying plans now to take advantage 
of the post-war improvement. The 
company was said to be lining up 
certain important men to dispatch 
to the Far East at the close of the 
war. 

The fact the war was giving the 
people in the Far East a better 
knowledge of America and the wide 
use of film for military and educa- 
tional purposes were cited by Perry 
as two important reasons for the 
advancement of American films there 
after the conflict. "The people in 
the Far East, are discovering the 
power of films," he asserted, adding 
that the growth of literacy in China 
and India also would work to the 
advantage of our film product in the 
territory under his supervision. 

Perry asserted that the film indus- 
try in this country would benefit im- 
mensely by the development of China 
into a prosperous nation. 



Possibilities in Australia after the 
war were described as "immense." 
Perry said that the move to develop 
irrigation in Australia would bring 
a new prosperity to the continent, 
with resultant benefit to the Amer- 
ican picture industry. 

Perry asserted that there was no 
reason to believe that Australia 
would not follow the example of the 
rest of the British Empire and un- 
freeze American film funds there. 

According to Perry, picture busi- 
ness has increased "tremendously" 
in Australia since the war started. 
He said patronage was so good he 
feared a saturation point was being 
reached in view of the proscription 
against the building of new theaters 
for the duration. 

To be appreciated war films in 
Australia have to be varied with 
escapist entertainment, Perry as- 
serted. 

Perry expects to leave for the 
Coast at the end of August, with his 
return to Australia scheduled for the 
middle of September. 



Chicago — Local theaters are co-operating 
with the WAVES to stage a "Meet Your 
Navy" show in the Stadium, the night of 
July 30. 



Ecuadorean Rep. Lauds 
Industry's War Job 

(.Continued from Page 1) 

tions, according to Col. Augustin 
Alban-Borja, Ecuadorean representa- 
tive on the Inter-American Defense 
Council, who visited Warner Bros. 
studio yesterday. 

"I have been particularly anxious 
to see Hollywood because of the im- 
portant work the motion picture in- 
dustry is doing in maintaining mor- 
ale in Latin American countries and 
in building better understanding be- 
tween all members of the United 
Nations," Col. Alban-Borja said. "It 
is significant, of theh trend" he con- 
tinued, "that Latin Americans, who 
formerly looked to Paris, now re- 
gard Hollywood as the art center of 
the world, drawing great artists and 
musicians from every country. Also, 
the training films which Warner 
Bros, and other studios have been 
making for the United States Army 
have proved invaluable in preparing 
the Army of my own country for 
war." 



"It Started In Odessa" 
Now "Seeds of Freedom' 



Modernized version of Sergei 
Eisenstein's "Potemkin" soon to be 
distributed by Artkino Pictures, Inc., 
has undergone a change of title from 
"It Started in Odessa" to "Seeds of 
Freedom." 

Produced by William Sekely and 
directed by Hans Burger, "Seeds 
of Freedom" represents a complex 
technical undertaking involving the 
creation of a new story framework, 
step-printing, dubbing, and careful 
substitution of enacted scenes for 
the printed sub-titles in Eisenstein's 
original, silent version. 

New framework for the film, pre- 
pared by Albert Maltz, features 
Henry Hull and Aline MacMahon, 
supported by Russell Collins, Grover 
Burgess, Martin Wolfson, Peter 
Frye and others. 



"Army" Look-See on Tuesday 

Warners will preview "This Is the 
Army" for New York critics, trades 
and dailies, Tuesday afternoon at the 
home office. 




TO THE COLORS! 



• PROMOTED • 

COL. A. CONGER GOODYEAR to brigadier 
general, with assignment as c.o., Second 
Brigade, New York Guard. General Good- 
year is a member of Paramount's board. 



* ARMY * 

RALPH WALLACE, manager, Lyric, Boonville, 

Mo. 
JOE REDDICK, manager, Auditorium, Marshall, 

Mo. 

EILEEN BURKE, WAC, formerly, 20th-Fox Cin- 
cinnati, to corporal. 

RALPH PATTERSON, USMC, formerly, manager, 
Park, West Falm Beach, Fla., to corporal. 

CHARLES LINDSEY, manager, State, Lake Wales, 
Fla. 

H. SWAN, manager, Cine, Chicago. 

* NAVY * 

JAMES IMMERMAN, son of Walter Immerman, 
B & K general manager, Chicago. 

— • — 

* SEEBEES * 

BURTON CLARK, Wometco Theaters, Miami, 
Fla. 



Polio Epidemic Increases 
Throughout Texas Area 



(Continued from Page 1) 

a wide Texan area are taking it on 
the chin. 

Mothers in the vicinity of the 
Airway, nabe, operated by P. G. 
Cameron, met and decided against 
any theater attendance for their 
youngsters. It has all but closed the 
house. Cameron has another nabe 
seriously affected. 

L. C. Tidball for his New Isis, 
Fort Worth nabe, reports a 90 per 
cent loss. Soldiers at Camp Wolters, 
Mineral Wells, will not be allowed 
leaves to visit Fort Worth and Dal- 
las, although no cases have been re- 
ported at the camp or in the city. 
This will hit the box-offices in these 
cities, as customarily hundreds of 
these men have made the trip weekly. 

At Springhill, La., the the R. B. 
McLendon Tri-States circuit, the 
Parish (county) authorities have 
asked for exclusion from theaters of 
those under 16. 

Jacksonville, in the Jefferson cir- 
cuit, was affected over the week-end, 
and new areas are as far west in 
Texas as Wichita County. The 
reach now is from Oklahoma City 
to Galveston, with total cases for 
Texas alone upwards of 500. 



The ... . 

FEMME TOUCH 



AMELIA GREENBERC, 20th-Fox exchange poster 
dept., New York. 

MRS. C. BANKS, Adsales dept. head, 20th-Fox, 
Atlanta. 

K. CAGER, Adsales dept. head, 20th-Fox, Chi- 
cago. 






DAILY 



Thursday, July 22, 1943 



* • R6VI6UJS Of SHORT SUBJECTS * • 



"Happy Times and Jolly Moments" 
(Broadway Brevities 
Warner 20 Mins. 

Tremendously Interesting 

This footage is made up of scenes 
from Mack Sennett comedies. It 
provides exhibitors with an extra- 
ordinary entertaining short and one 
that will stir no end of interest and 
talk. The sight of comedy stars of 
the early days of the industry who 
got their start in the Sennett fun- 
ny films will rouse the memories 
of those who had the good fortune of 
seeing in action the players who 
move across the screen in these 
highlights from the Sennett product. 

The strange thing about it all is 
that the antics of those early day 
slapstick comics are still funny. 
Among the old-timers seen are Sen- 
nett, himself, Ben Turpin, James 
Finlay/sonj, Harry (Langdon, ,Slim 
Summerville, Ford Sterling, Chester 
Conklin "Fatty" Arbuckle, the Key- 
stone Cops and the famous Sennett 
bathing beauties, including Mable 
Normand, Louise Fazenda and Glor- 
ia Swanson. Book this and hear 
the customers howl. 



"The Uninvited Pest" 

(M-G-M Cartoon) 

M-G-M 8 mins. 

Amusing Stuff 

Because it depicts how one's sleep 
can be disturbed by minor annoy- 
ances which assume major import- 
ance, this reel will amuse all adults, 
and its simple, direct, and humor- 
ous story will likewise please the 
younger generation. Mr. Bear is 
settling down for a good snooze when 
a little squirrel enters his cabin to 
raid a bowl of nuts therein. Vast 
confusion follows, with the bear get- 
ting the worst of it, and finally turn- 
ing over the edible booty to the in- 
vader. 



"A Revival of Moments of Charm" 

(Headliner) 
Paramount 10'/2 mins. 

Fair 

The name of Phil Spitalny should 
help a lot in drawing attention to 
this musical offering. The baton 
wielder leads his all-girl orchestra 
in a group of musical compositions 
among which are "Toy Trumpet," 
"Ave Maria" and "Begin the Be- 
guine." Evelyn, she of "the magic 
violin," does a solo, with "The Bee" 
as her selection. The voice of Max- 
ine is heard in the Ave Maria num- 
ber. The short is in color that leaves 
much to be desired. 



"Porky Pig's Feat" 
(Looney Tune) 
Warner 7 Mins. 

Funny 

Leon Schlesinger has united Porky 
Pig and Daffy Duck in a Technicol- 
or cartoon that is productive of a 
fair number of laughs. The action 
revolves around the efforts of the 
two characters to slip out of a 
hotel where they owe a fat bill. They 
try devious means of escape with 
humorous results. Speed has been 
stressed in the animation. 



"Secret Agent" 

(Superman) 

Paramount 9 mins. 

Like All the Others 

This is Superman's fadeout. It 
cannot be trutfully said that our 
mighty man winds up his screen life 
in a blaze of glory. The last of the 
series of Technicolor cartoons is 
just as fantastic as its predecessors, 
with the appeal strictly to the kids. 
This time Superman smashes a gang 
of saboteurs after a femme agent 
who has gotten the dope on the lice 
and is about to spill it to the au- 
thorities. It is denied that Superman 
has left the screen to go into the 
Army, where the likes of him would 
indeed be welcome. 



"Higher Than a Kite" 

Columbia 18 mins. 

Same Old Tricks 

The Three Stooges deviate from 
their set routine not one iota in their 
latest screen appearance. While the 
material is painfully familiar, the 
film will succeed in extracting laughs 
from those who relish slapstick, be 
it good or bad. Laughs, however, 
are obtained at the waste of much 
footage. The story places the Stooges 
in England, where they are working 
as garage mechanics while awaiting 
to realize their ambition to become 
RAF pilots. They have a chance 
to become heroes when a huge bomb 
in which they crawl by error is 
dropped on German army headquart- 
ers, where they cop valuable docu- 



ments. Del Lord and Hugh McCol- ladies' jewelry. The short is in 



lum produced, with the former also 
directing. 



"Seeing Hands" 

(Pete Smith Specialty) 

M-G-M 11 mins. 

Will Thrill Patrons 

Every theater using tab reels, — 
even if, as a regular policy, they 
don't — , can play "Seeing Hands" 
to telling advantage. It's the amaz- 
ing and inspiring story of a small 
boy who lost his sight, but persevered 
to become a brilliant manual worker 
in war industry, accomplishing with 
his sensitive hands what many of 
the foremost craftsmen cannot do 
equally well with their full senses 
and co-ordination. Patrons every- 
where will get a big thrill out of 
this latest offering by Pete Smith. 
G. V. Fritsch's direction is excellent. 



"Unusual Occupations" 

(L2-5) 

Paramount 10 mins. 

Interesting 

This one is on a par with the others 
of the series. Some of the stuff is 
mighty interesting. Two items are 
distinctly worth seeing. One has to 
do with a girl who teaches horses to 
dive. The other is concerned with 
the training of the Navy's deep-sea 
divers. The rest of the footage is 
given over to a fellow who collects 
shaving mugs and a biologist who 
uses scales from gar fish to make 



Urges Stricter Policing 
Of All-Night Theaters 

(Continued from Page 1) 

causes of the Detroit race riots, pre- 
pared by Sheridan A. Bruseaux, op- 
erating a private investigation 
agency. 

Much of the earlier trouble during 
the first night of the riots, as they 
spread from scattered fights into 
out-and-out mobbing that took so 
many lives, occurred right in this 
sector of Woodward Avenue, and 
one theater turned in 12 riot calls 
during the night. Some advised pat' 
rons to leave by the rear doors, and 
all were closed early on the morn- 
ing after a police authority. 

In the conclusions of the investi- 
gator, the all-night houses occupied 
a prominent part, and, with consid- 
eration for their mixed racial pat- 
ronage, more vigorous policing was 
urged. Local exhibitors who have 
spoken on the situation concur 
strongly in this verdict. 



Two New AAA Clerks 

Two new clerks have been named 
by the American Arbitration Asso- 
ciation to manage the motion pic- 
ture tribunals in Charlotte and 
Omaha. J. B. Shatzer has been ap- 
pointed clerk of the Charlotte office, 
succeeding Joseph Wright. In Omaha, 
Harry J. Andrews has been named 
to replace George H. Thompson. 



Raps Publicity-Seekers 
Using Films As Target 

Chicago — Criticizing persons who 
seek publicity by attacking motion 
pictures, Ira Latimer, Executive Sec- 
retary of the Civil Liberties Com- 
mittee here, has written a letter to 
Vernon A. Nickell, Superintendent 
of Public Instruction for the state 
of Illinois, commending him for 
ignoring the censorship attempts of 
Attorney General George F. Bar- 
rett against Warner's "Mission to 
Moscow." 

"Mr. Barrett has a right to get 
publicity for his views against Sov- 
iet Russia," the letter says in part, 
"but he does not have a right to re- 
quest you to use the public schools 
of Illinois to promote a boycott of 
this or any other motion picture. 
The very attempt of Mr. Barrett to 
use the schools of Illinois to pro- 
mote his particular political opin- 
ions is a danger signal which must 
be a warning to you and all citizens 
of the state against those who would 
intimidate or stop freedom of dis- 
cussion of all social, economical and 
political problems." 



Magnacolor. 



"The Truck That Flew" 

(Madcap Models) 

Paramount 8 mins. 

Good 

George Pal's new offering is a 
very amusing little item artistica/"* 
created. It's a fantasy based o\ 
story by Dudley Morris. It tells ox 
a little chap whose thoughts turn 
to a flying truck at bedtime. Pres- 
to, he dreams of being wafted sky- 
ward, with his bed transformed into 
a big truck. The lad's dream jour- 
ney is marked by excitement and hu- 
man incidents. The short, which is 
in fine Technicolor, makes a classy 
booking. 



"The Hungry Goat" 

(Popeye) 

Paramount 7 mins. 

Mild 

In his newest animated cartoon 
appearance Popeye tangles with a 
billy goat with a voracious appe- 
tite. The goat comes aboard Pop- 
eye's ship and proceeds to eat every- 
thing of metal in sight, including 
the battle wagon itself. Popeye and 
the admiral, whose ship it is, have 
a hopeless time besting the goat, 
which winds up having the last laugh 
on them. The number of laughs is 
limited. 



Huss Licks the Mumps 

Cincinnati — Wes Huss Jr., prexy 
of Associated Theaters and of the 
Southern Ohio Independent Theater 
Owners Association, has recovered 
from a severe attack of the mumps, 
and is back at his desk. 



"Where Cactus Grows" 

(Grantland Rice Sportlight) 

Paramount %Vz mins. 

Good 

The lure of the desert country has 
been well caught in their short, 
which is highly interesting and en- 
tertaining. The audience is taken 
to the California-Arizona desert 
lands for a glimpse of life, human 
and otherwise, there. Included in 
the footage are scenes of our troops 
training in desert warfare. The 
outdoor calls strongly to you in this 
film, which has been enriched with 
magnificent photography that cap- 
tures all the beauty of the setting. 



"Nursery Rhyme Mysteries" 

(Passing Parade) 

M-G-M 11 mins. 

Intriguing Short 

As far as trade records at hand 
are concerned, Producer John Nes- 
bitt commercially spots no middle 
name. "Ingenious" will do. This, 
like his predecessor shorts, is de- 
cidedly original and intriguing. He 
shows that some of the innocent 
sounding nursery rhymes spring 
from true and important historical 
episodes. He illustrates the conten- 
tion by showing what is back of 
three of the best-known jingles, deal- 
ing actually with Mary of Scotland, 
Henry VIII and James II, England's 
erstwhile rulers. Here is an ace 
subject that will please and inform 
virtually everyone. E. Cahn's di- 
rection of it is keen. 



Thursday, July 22, 1943 



DAILY 



Renewal of Decree 
Reported Assured 



(Continued from Page 1) 

workings of the decree since its in- 
ception by D of J officials is reported 
to have resulted in the determina- 
tion of its weaknesses, with the prob- 
ability that the weak points will be 
strengthened and certain provis- 

~-^g discarded or replaced. 

To what extent the D of J has 

"considered the recommendations of 
exhibitor associations and distribu- 
tors has not been learned, although 
it has been reported that the depart- 
ment has weighed all proposals care- 
fully. 



HOLLYWOOD DIGEST 



Chaplin Suing Selznick, 
Others on 20th-Fox Deal 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Fox, et al, and reported to involve 
the sale of plays and players by 
Selznick, was confirmed yesterday, 
and formal service of papers in the 
action is expected this week or early 
next week, it is learned from chan- 
nels close to the proceedings. 

Representing Chaplin in the action 
is the prominent motion picture law 
firm of Schwartz & Frohlich. Action 
is in jurisdiction of the New York 
Supreme Court. 

UA Statement Denies Cause of 
Action Against David Selznick 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Following the United 
Artists stockholders meeting yes- 
terday, President Edward C. Raf- 
tery issued this statement: "United 
Artists has received ,a demand made 
by Charles Schwartz, New York 
counsel for Charles Chaplin, that the 
company sue David 0. Selznick and 
his various companies in connection 
with a series of deals made by the 
Selznick organization with 20th-Fox. 
We have told Schartz, among other 
things, that United Artists has no 
cause of action against Selznick or 
any of his companies. 

"It was upon receipt of this state- 
ment that Schwartz, on behalf of 
Chaplin, filed a stockholders action 
in Supreme Court, New York Coun- 
ty, naming Selznick and his com- 
pany, 20th-Fox Film Corp. and 
United Artists as defendants. United 
Artists will defend the action so far 
as itself and any of its officers are 
involved. The company's affairs are 
in no way affected by the pending 
action." 

Present at meeting were Mary 
Pickford, Selznick, Alfred N. Reeves, 
Mendel Silberberg, Daniel T. O'Shea, 
Charles Milliken, George Bagnal and 
Raftery. 



CASTINGS 

EDWARD FRANCIS O'SHEA, "Jack London," 
Samuel Bronston-UA; DOLORES MORAN, "Dan- 
ger Signal," Warners; BILL EDWARDS, "Hail 
the Conquering Hero," Paramount; JEAN 
PARKER and RUSSELL HAYDEN, "The Navy 
Way," Paramount; HILARY BROOKE, "Stand- 
ing Room Only," Paramount; PHIL SILVERS, 
"Cover Girl," Columbia. 
• 

STORY PURCHASES 

JACQUES THERY and LUDWIC BEMELMAN'S 
"Yolanda and the Thief," M-C-M. 



REOPTIONED 

DAVE O'BRIEN, Alexander Stern Productions. 
JIM NEWILL, Alexander Stern Productions. 
GUY WILKERSON, Alexander Stern Productions. 
GEORGE BARNES, cameraman, David 0. Selznick 



TITLE SWITCHES 

'Army Wife," formerly "Paris, Tenn.," 20th- 

Fox. 
'So This is Washington," formerly "Dollar a 

Year Man," RKO. 
'The Gang's All Here," formerly "The Girls 

He Left Behind," 20th-Fox. 
'Return of the Vampire," formerly "Vampires of 

London," Columbia. 



SCHEDULED 

"Gorilla Menace, Continental (]. D. Kendis). 
"Calling All Stars," story, MONTE BRUCE, pro- 
ducer, IRVING BRISKIN, Columbia. 
"College Sweetheart," producer, LINDSLEY 

PARSONS; director, ARTHUR DREIFUSS; 

songs, EDWARD KAY and EDWARD CHER- 

KOSE. 
'Nine Lives," original story, MYLES CONNOLLY 

and JEFFERSON PARKER, producer, 

MAURICE CERAGHTY, RKO. 
"Convention Murder," original story, JOHN 

FAXON, King Bros, for Monogram. 
"Coffin for .Dimitrios," producer, HENRY 

BLANKE; author, ERIC AMBLER; screen- 
play, A. I. BEZZERIDES. 
"Yolanda and the Thief," producer, E. Y 

HARBURC, M-G-M. 
"Danger Signal," screenplay, THOMAS ]0B 

and JO BACONO; producer, WILLIAM 

JACOBS, Warners. 
"The Little Church Around the Corner," story, 

BERTRAM HORLICK, Monogram. 



ASSIGNMENTS 

HENRY KING, director, "Woodrow Wilson," 
20th-Fox. 

PFC. VICTOR A. PAHLEN, USA, technical advis- 
or, "Girl from Leningrad," R & F Pro- 
duction-UA. 



Harold Field Adds 
Six Iowa Theaters 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Chieftian and Casino at Sac City and 
a house at Cherokee. The Sac City 
and Cherokee theaters were owned 
by Norman and Jack Kuech. 

Field is head of the Pioneer the- 
ater circuit with houses in Minne- 
sota and Iowa. 

Field recently incorporated the 
Three F Theater Corp. The papers 
listed 5,000 shares of non par value 
stock. 

Listed as the officers were Har- 
old D. Field of St. Paul, Minn., pres- 
ident; Herman Fields of Clarinda, 
la,, vice-president; (and Gertrude 
Framhein of St. Louis Park, Minn., 
secretary-treasurer. Harold Field 
is the head of the Pioneer theater 
circuit. 



Lowenstein Names Seven 
Committees for N. J. Unit 



Win 20% Assessment Cut 

Slash of 20 per cent in assessment 
of $310,000, previously levied against 
the land and building of the York- 
town Theater, 252 W. 89th St., has 
been ordered, following a Supreme 
Court hearing. G. A. Hammer of 
Charles F. Noyes, for the owner, and 
Samuel Augenblick, for the city, tes- 
tified as experts. 



Seven committees to function with 
New Jersey Allied have been ap- 
pointed by Harry Loewenstein, unit 
president. Appointments, which will 
be effective for one year, are as fol- 
lows: 

Executive Committee: Harry Lowenstein, 
chairman; Louis Gold, Ralph Wilkins. David 
Snaper, Edward Lachman, David Mate and 
Maurice Spewak. 

Finance Committee: David Snaper, chair- 
man; Helen Hilding-er, Edward Lachman and 
Sidney Seligman. 

Membership Committee: South Jersey — 
Sam Frank, chairman: Herbert Hill. Jr.. 
Frances Fineman and D. Roscoe Faunce; 
North Jersey — David Mate, chairman: Ed- 
ward Lachman, M. H. Fogelson and Dr. 
Henry Brown. 

Entertainment Committee: Irving' Dol- 
Iiug'er, chairman: Louis Gold, Maurice Mil- 
ler, Dr. Henry Brown, Herbert Hill. Jr., 
and Harry Hecht, 

Public Relations Committee: Lee New- 
bury, chairman: Georgre Gold, Irving' Dol- 
ling-er and Simon Myers. 

Business Relations Committee: Jack Unger, 
chairman; Samuel Hoehberg, Frank Henry 
and A. Lewis Martin. 

Eastern Regional Directors Committee: 
Finance, David Snaper; business relations, 
Lee Newbury and Ralph Wilkins: public 



'Bands' for Bridgeport Lyric 

Bridgeport, Conn. — It is reported 
the Lyric will reopen the end of Aug- 
ust with "name" bands and other 
vaude for week-end program and an 
undetermined policy rest of the 
week. 



Wiethe and Hoskins Sell 
Cincinnati Bond Theater 

Cincinnati — The Bond theater, 
erected in 1937, was sold by its pres- 
ent owners, Louis Wiethe and Dr. J. 
S. Hoskins to an undisclosed party 
rumored to be the Emery Estate. 
Wiethe and Hoskins will continue to 
operate, taking a 15-year lease. 
They also operate three other mod- 
ern suburban houses in greater Cin- 
cinnati. 



W 



v^ 



f v** B 



SEEKING A DEPENDABLE 
SOURCE OF SUPPLY FOR YOUR 

THEATRE 
TICKETS? 



INTERNATIONAL OFFERS: 
Dependable service . . . Low cost . . . 
45 year's experience serving theatres, 
stadiums, amusement parks, etc. 
We can supply your needs. Roll, 
machine folded, reserve seats, etc. 
Write (or samples, prices or other information. 

Delivery tree Maine to Virginia. 

INTERNATIONAL 

TICKET ffim COMPANY 

52 GRAFTON AVE. \S/ NEWARK, N. J. 
Sales Offices in Principal Centers 



[ROY ROGERS TRIGGER 

J KING OF TNE COWBOYS SMARTEST NORSE IN TNE MOVIES 

in 

"SONG OF 
TEXAS' 




ENTHUSIASTIC EXHIBITORS 




to the Community Security results they are getting with 
these Screen Broadcasts Government Campaigns. # 



OPA 

WAR SAVINGS 



ODT OCD 

LABOR -JOB SAFETY 



WPB 
PUBLIC HEALTH 



Why don't you add YOUR THEATRE to this impressive 
list of Screen Broadcasts Exhibitors? 



*?You are compensated 
for these showings 






A. W. ADAMSON THEATRES 

Medford, Ore. 
AFFILIATED THEATRES CIRCUIT, INC. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
ALLISON THEATRES 

Cresson, Pa. 
ALTOONA PUBLIX THEATRES, INC. 

Altoona, Pa. 
ALLIANCE THEATRE CORP. 

Chicago, 111. 
AMERICAN THEATRE CORP. 

Louisville, Ky. 
ATLAS THEATRE CORP. 

Denver, Colo. 
BIJOU AMUSEMENT CO. 

Nashville, Tenn. 
BLATT BROS. CIRCUIT 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
BRANDT THEATRES 

New York, N. Y. 
CENTRAL STATES THEATRE CORP. 

Des Moines, Iowa 
CHEROKEE AMUSEMENTS, INC. 

La Follette, Tenn. 
COLE THEATRES, INC. 

Rosenberg, Tex. 
COMMONWEALTH AMUSEMENT CORP. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
J. H. COOPER ENTERPRISES, INC. 

Denver, Colo 
CRESCENT AMUSEMENT CO. 

Nashville, Tenn. 
S. W. CRAVER THEATRES 

Charlotte, N C. 
CUMBERLAND AMUSEMENT CO., INC. 

McMinnville, Tenn. 
DIXIE THEATRES 

New Orleans, La. 
ELLIOTT-WARD ENTERPRISES 

Lexington, Ky. 
ENDICOTT CIRCUIT 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
FOURTH AVE. AMUSEMENT CO. 

Louisville, Ky. 
FOX INTERMOUNTAIN THEATRES, INC. 

Denver, Colo. 
FOX MIDWEST AMUSEMENT CORP. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
GIBRALTAR ENTERPRISES, INC. 

Denver, Colo. 



HARVEY AMUSEMENT CO. 

San Francisco, Cal. 
HAVEN CIRCUIT 

Forrest City, Ark. 
HAVERFELD-FLEXER THEATRES 

Memphis, Tenn. 
HUDSON THEATRES CO. 

Richmond, Ind. 
HUISH THEATRE ENTERPRISES 

Salt Lake City, Utah 
IDEAL AMUSEMENT CO. 

Johnstown, Pa. 
INTERBORO CIRCUIT, INC. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
INTERSTATE CIRCUIT, INC. 

Dallas, Tex. 
JOY'S THEATRES 

New Orleans, La. 
KAYBERN THEATRES 

New York, N. Y. 
LAM AMUSEMENT CO., INC. 

Rome, Ga. 
E. M. LOEW'S THEATRES 

Boston, Mass. 
LONG THEATRES 

Bay City, Tex. 
LUCAS & JENKINS, INC. 

Atlanta, Ga. 
SIDNEY LUST THEATRES 

Washington, D. C. 
M. & P. THEATRES CORP. 

Boston, Mass. 
MALCO THEATRES, INC. 

Memphis, Tenn. 
MARTIN THEATRES 

Columbus, Ga. 
CHAS. MORSE THEATRES 

Boston, Mass. 
NEWBURY CIRCUIT 

Belmar, N. J. 
PAL THEATRES 

Vidalia, Ga. 
PARAMOUNT-WILBY-KINCEY 
THEATRE CIRCUIT 

H. F. Kincey Theatres, 
Charlotte, N. C. 

R. B. Wilby Theatres, 
Atlanta, Ga. 
PIRTLE CIRCUIT 

Jerseyville, 111. 



PUBLIXBAMFORD THEATRES 

Arheville, N. C. 
REDWOOD THEATRES, INC. 

San Francisco, Cal. 
ROSENBLATT-WELT THEATRES CORP. 

New York, N. Y. 
RUFFIN AMUSEMENT CO., INC. 

Covington, Tenn. 
S. & S. THEATRES 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
SCHULTE"S THEATRES 

Detroit, Mich. 
SETTOS THEATRES 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
SCHINE CIRCUIT, INC. 

Gloversville, N. Y. 
SHARBY THEATRES 

Keene, N. H. 
SIMONS AMUSEMENT CO. 

Missoula. Mont. 
MORT H. SINGER THEATRES CORP. 

Chicago, 111. 
SNAPER CIRCUIT 

New York, N. Y. 
SOUTHERN AMUSEMENT CO., INC. 

Lake Charles, La. 
SPROULE THEATRE CIRCUIT 

Hutchinson, Kans. 
STRAND ENTERPRISES, INC. 

Memphis, Tenn. 
SUN THEATRE CO.. 

Plainwell, Mich. 
M. SWITOW & SONS ENTERPRISES, 
INC. 

Louisville, Ky. 
T. &D. JR. ENTERPRISES, INC. 

San Francisco, Cal. 
TAMA THEATRE CO. 

Tama, Iowa 
TANNER THEATRE CIRCUIT 

Pana, 111. 
THEATRICAL MANAGERS, INC. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
TRI-STATES THEATRE CORP. 

Des Moines, Iowa 
UNITED THEATRES, INC. 

New Orleans, La. 
WARREN L. WEBER 

Burlington, Kans. 
WATERS THEATRE CO. 

Birmingham, Ala. 



Write for Theatre Relations Representative to 
call to discuss details and show you these films. 



.©BBSS! IBIM)&®@J^PI 



923 FIFTEENTH STREET, N. W. 



WASHINGTON. D. C. 



MOTION PICTURE ADVERTISING SERVICE CO., INC., NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA 

Distributors in Southern, Atlantic and New England States 

UNITED FILM SERVICE, INC., KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 

Distributors in Northern, Mid-Western and Western States 



1 J CIN Z Z DAN 

IS H 1VV M UZ 

I N I A 1 ' ' N » I S J 



DO 






Intimate in Character 
International in Scope 
Independent in Thought 




The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Twenty-Five Years Old 



_J>> 84, NO. 16 



NEW YORK, FRIDAY, JULY 23, 1943 



TEN CENTS 



MPTOAUNITS TO TRY^ CONCILIATION PLAN 

Chaplin's Selznick Accounting Suit Asks Million 



Editorial 



"What's in. 

... a name?" 



= By CHESTER B. BAHN = 

WHAT'S in a name?" ... If the ghost 
of the Bard still has a lingering doubt, 
it — or, if you prefer, he — might profit by 
cogitating Metro's announcement of the 
week that the company has appropriated an 
initial $125,000 budget to be expended sole- 
ly and especially for exploitation and promo- 
tional aids to its small-town customers hard 
hit by conditions arising from the war. . . . 
For verily, it is not for nothing that Metro's 
other name in this industry is "the friendly 
company." . . . 

• 

METRO'S approach to the pressing and 
frequently acute problem of the "little 
fellow" is an distinctive as is its action in 
setting aside a specific sum for the given 
purpose. . . . The import of Howard Dietz's 
comment, "We intend to stimulate trade 
in every section of the country that has 
suffered from the shifting of population 
during these abnormal times," will not 
escape the observant. . . . Efforts to amelior- 
ate the plight of the exhib. in situations 
where the war has taken its toll of movie- 
goers heretofore have been largely of the 
"adjustment" variety. . . . There's nothing 
wrong with that, of course. . . . 

• 

DUT the new Metro approach may be 
** still better. . . . Perhaps a more inten- 
sive exploitation and promotion campaign in 
those spots where business has fallen off 
sharply under the impact of war-time con- 
ditions can restore and maintain box-office 
levels. . . . It's possible, surely. . . . And 
in that connection, you need only recall 
how there were those who cried out that 
with the loss of the foreign market, all was 
lost. . . . Yet more thorough cultivation of 
the domestic market by distributors and 
exhibitors alike has raised company earnings 
to peak figures. ... Of course, war-time 
prosperity has helped — that's patent and 
cheerfully conceded. . . . 

• 

DUT equally patent is the fact that the 
^ industry, put to the test, found itself a 
new audience of 5,000,000 weekly in a 
year. ... It could be that there are still 
more where those millions came from. . . . 
Metro's experiment, within a reasonable 
period, may provide the answer. . . . And 
this columnar commentator has a hunch that 
the $125,000 — note it's a starting bud- 
get — will prove one of the best investments 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Complaint Turns Spotlight 
On Selznick-UA Agree- 
ment, 20th-Fox Named 



Suit was formally filed yesterday 
in New York Supreme Court by 
Charles Chaplin, suing on his behalf 
and all other stockholders of United 
Artists Corp. similarly situated, 
against David O. Selznick, David O. 
Selznick Productions, Inc., Vanguard 
Films, Inc., Twentieth Century-Fox 
Film Corp. and United Artists Corp. 

Complaint charges that David O. 
Selznick and David O. Selznick Pro- 
ductions in the latter part of 1942 
sold, assigned and transferred lit- 

(Continued on Page 6) 

Adult Delinquency 
Northwest Problem 



Pittsburgh 1st Runs 
Tilt Prices a Dime 

Pittsburgh — Effective over the 
week-end and with the change of 
current programs, Loew's Penn, Stan- 
ley, Warner, J. P. Harris, Senator, 
Fulton and Ritz Theaters, all first- 
run downtown houses, increased their 
adult admission prices by approxi- 
mately 10 cents; children's admis- 
sions remain the same. 



Kansas-Missouri Ass'n 
Among First to Sponsor 
Dispute Settling Method 



Soviet Purchases 
Warners' "Moscow 



Portland, Ore. — Adult delinquency 
is as great if not greater problem 
than juvenile vandalism and hood- 
lumism in this territory, with cir- 
cuit executives and house managers 
reporting theater maintenance as a 
result one continuing headache. 

As an example of what operators 

(Continued on Page 7) 

McConville Names O'Mal- 
ley Foreign Ad-Pub. Head 

Joseph A. McConville, Columbia 
vice-president and foreign manager, 
yesterday announced the appoint- 
ment of David A. O'Malley as direc- 
tor of foreign advertising and pub- 

(Continued on Page 4) 



The Soviet Government has pur- 
chased "Mission to Moscow" for dis- 
tribution in Russia and a master 
print is now en route there by air, 
it was learned authoritatively yes- 
terday in the wake of published sto- 
ries to the effect that Premiere Sta- 
lin had nixed the Warner pic as re- 
leased in the U. S. for exhibition 
within the Soviets. 

Considerable confusion as to exact 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Hearst-Sponsored Festival 
As "Rising Sun" Send-Off 



Boston — A new twist in premiere 
bally, RKO Radio will launch "Be- 
hind the Rising Sun" here to the 
accompaniment of a giant War Bond 
boxing-wrestling-musical festival in 
Boston's Garden, the latter curtain- 
raiser set for Aug. 1, two days ah«ad 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Affirm Gary Case Dismissal 

Appeal Board Hits Combined Actions 



$22,000-Plus for Army 
Relief from Pic's Debut 

World premiere of Warners' film 
version of "This Is the Army" at the 
Hollywood next Wednesday will yield 
Army Emergency Relief well in ex- 
cess of $22,000. Ticket sale alone 
will hit that figure, while proceeds 
from the program will swell it. 



Practice of combining in one ar- 
bitration proceeding two separate 
and distinct causes of action against 
separate and distinct defendants and 
interveners was criticized by the ar- 
bitration appeal board which af- 
firmed an arbitrator's decision dis- 
missing the clearance case filed by 
the Palace Theater, Gary, Ind. 

Complainant had named some of 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Use of conciliation before resort- 
ing to arbitration will be tried by 
some MPTOA units shortly, it was 
reported yesterday. Among the first 
to adopt conciliation is the Kansas- 
Missouri Theater Association which 
is sponsoring its first conciliated 
complaint this month. 

It is reported that the Charlotte, 
N. C, unit has been practicing con- 
ciliation for some time without any 
publicity and it appears likely that 
the system will be taken up more 
(Continued on Page 4) 

McMurphey Gets OCR 
Amusement Post 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — Exhibitors will deal 
hereafter with George W. McMur- 
phey on matters affecting theater 
operation. McMurphey, with long 
experience in Government, most re- 

(Continued on Page 6) 

Report Pickford-Gordon 
Close for "Junior Miss" 



An agreement whereby Mary 
Pickford and Max Gordon will ac- 
quire the screen rights to "Junior 
Miss" was reportedly reached yes- 

(Continued on Page 7) 



36-40 for 20th-Fox 
as Budget Skyrockets 

West Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Boosting its budget 
to an all-time high of $41,000,000, 
30 per cent more than the top figure 
in the past, 20th-Fox will make a 
minimum of 36 and a maximum of 
40 features for 1943-44, according 
to production plans finalized here 
by Spyros Skouras and Joseph M. 
Schenck with Darryl F. Zanuck. Peak 
allocations go to Wendell L. Willkie's 
"One World" and "Wilson," both 
of which Zanuck will personally pro- 
duce. 



THE' 



iynw 

k DAILY 




Vol. 84, No. 16 Fri., July 23, 1943 lOCents 



JOHN W. ALICOATE : : : : Publisher 



DONALD M. MERSEREAU : General Manager 



CHESTER B. BAHN : : : : : : Editor 



Published daily except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays at 1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. 
Y., by Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President and Publisher; Donald M. 
Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer. Entered as 
second class matter, Sept. 8, 1938, at the 
post-office at New York, N. Y., under the 
act of March 3, 1879. Terms (Postage free) 
United States outside of Greater New York 
$10.00 one year: 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, 
$3.00. _ Foreign, $15.00. Subscriber should 
remit with order. Address all communications 
to THE FILM DAILY, 1501 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7117, 
9-7118, 9-7119, 9-7120, 9-7121. Cable address: 
Filmday, New York. 



Representatives: HOLLYWOOD, 28, Calif.— 
Ralph Wilk, 6425 Hollywood Blvd., Phone 
Granite 6607. WASHINGTON— Andrew H. 
Older, 520 Third St. N.W., Phone District 1253. 
LONDON— Ernest W. Fredman, The Film 
Renter, 127-133 Wardour St., W. I. PARIS— 
P. A. Harle, Le Film, 29 Rue Marsoulan (12). 
HAVANA — Mary Louise Blanco, Virtudes 
214. HONOLULU — Eileen O'Brien. 
BUENOS AIRES— Dr. Walter P. Schuck, 
Casillo de Correo 1929. MEXICO CITY— 
Marco- Aurelio Galindo, Apartado 8817, Mex- 
ico, D. F. 



FINANCIAL, 



{Thursday, July 22) 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 

High low Close Chg. 

163,4 1634 163/ 4 + l/ 4 
) 181/2 181/ 2 18 l/ 2 + l/ 4 



Am. Seat 

Col. Picts. vtc. <2'/ 2 % 
Columbia Picts. pfd.. 

Con. Fm. Ind 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd.. . 

East. Kodak 

do pfd 

Cen. Prec. Eq 

Loew's, Inc 

Paramount 

RKO 

RKO$6 pfd 

20th Century-Fox . . . 
20th Century-Fox pfd, 

Univ. iPict. pfd 

Warner Bros 

do pfd 



23/ 4 23/ 4 23/ 4 — l/ 8 

17 1634 17 

16734 1671/2 1673/4 + 3/ 4 



215/ 8 21 3/g 213/g — 1/4 

63 625/g 63 + 1/4 

291/s 2834 29 

91/2 91/4 91/4 — i/ 8 

94 93 93 

231/2 231/4 233/g - i/ 8 

333/4 331/ 2 333/4 + 1/s 



15 



I43/4 I43/4 — 1/g 



NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Para. 8-way 3s55.... 771/2 77i/ 2 77i/ 2 

Para. Picts. deb. 4s56 

Warner Bros.' dbs. 6s48 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 
Monogram Picts. ... 354 354 35/ 8 — i/ 8 

RKO war 1% 134 134 

Sonotone Corp 3% 3 3 4 3% 

Technicolor 15% 15y 8 15% + 3/ 8 

Trans-Lux 3i/ 8 2% 2% — 14 

Universal Picts. vtc. 18'/ 4 18V4 I81/4 

N. Y. OVER-THE-COUNTER SECURITIES 

Bid Asked 

Met. Playhouse, Inc. 2nd deb. '45 

Roxy Thea. Bldg. 4s 1st '57 



Ampa's Membership Com. 
Headed by Paul Benjamin 

Ampa's membership committee for 
the new year, announced yesterday 
by President Vincent Trotta, em- 
braces Paul Benjamin, NSS, chair- 
man; Phil Laufer, Rivoli; Jonas 
Rosenfield, 20th-Fox; Blanche Liv- 
ingston, RKO; Fred Odium, Broad- 
way Uptown, and William McKee, 
Ross Federal Service. 



"What's In... 

. . . a name?" 

(Continued from Page 1) 

that Leo the Lion, et al (meaning essen- 
tially William F. Rodgers and Howard Dietz) 
have made. . . . 

• 

INCIDENTALLY, it might be, in fact, it 
' should be noted, that Metro does not 
stand alone to benefit from the investment. 
. . . If it turns up a host of new customers 
or increases the frequency of film attendance 
by the established house clientele, the bene- 
fits generally will be spread around Metro's 
competitors as well. . . . That's important, 
too, although Metro's announcement mod- 
estly spoke only of its desire to aid "exhib- 
itors whose prosperity is considered by 
M-G-M so important to the community life 
of America." 



Buffalo Theaters Files 
As Basil Intervenor 



Buffalo — _ Buffalo Theaters,' "Inc., 
has filed as intervenor in two clear- 
ance cases brought by Basil Bros. 
Theaters. On behalf of Shea's North 
Park and Shea's Kensington, Buf- 
falo, it intervened in case brought 
for Basil's Varsity, and on behalf of 
Shea's Bellvue, Niagara Falls, it in- 
tervened in case brought for Basil's 
LaSalle, Niagara Falls. The five 
signers of the New York consent de- 
cree are defendants in both actions. 

In the Varsity case, Basil asked 
reduction of clearance of four to ten 
days favoring Schine's Granada to 
immediately after the Granada. S. 
G. Theater Corporation, Gloversville, 
for the Granada, and Dipson The- 
aters, Inc., for the Amherst inter- 
vened previously. 

In the LaSalle case, Basil asked 
reduction of present clearance of 35 
days favoring the Bellvue, Cataract 
and Strand, three Niagara Falls 
first-runs, to "a reasonable time, as 
determined by the arbitrator." Cat- 
aract Theater Corporation had in- 
tervened previously for the Cataract 
and Strand, Hayman houses. 



Duncan, Okla., Exhib. 
Files "Run" Complaint 

Charging that Paramount has re- 
fused to license second-run product 
to the Ritz Theater, Duncan, Okla., 
J. A. Guest, operator of the house, 
has filed a demand for arbitration in 
the Oklahoma City tribunal. Guest 
claims that second-run is sold by 
Paramount to theaters of the Grif- 
fith circuit. He also asks for reas- 
onable clearance. 



Apollo Hearing on Aug. 12 

Buffalo — First hearing in arbitra- 
tion case brought by Basil Bros. The- 
aters for its Apollo, Buffalo, has 
been postponed to Aug. 12 before 
Arbitrator Roland H. Tills. 



Roffman Joining Hillman 

Richard H. Roffman joins the staff 
of Hillman periodicals as of Aug. 1 
as director of publicity and promo- 
tion. In his new association, he will 
be connected with Movieland mag- 
azine as well as others of the Hill- 
man chain. 



Friday, July 23, 19^ 



Marvin Grieve Cited 
On Italian Mission 

Marvin M. Grieve, former mem- 
ber of Mort Blumenstock's Warner 
Bros, advertising department, now 
2nd lieutenant, USAAF, was cited by 
the War Department as co-pilot of a 
B-26 bomber which took part in an 
attack over Italy. While returning 
to its North African base, his plane 
was able to escape enemy planes 
through the bravery of its pilot who 
ordered the crew to jump while he 
remained at his post and was killed. 



160 "Aleutians" Prints 
To be Shipped in Week 



Theatrical release is now assured 
for the 47-minute Technicolor film, 
"Report from the Aleutians," made 
by the Army Signal Corps and sub- 
mitted to the WAC by the OWL Pic 
will be available to theaters which 
may wish to book it in each exchange 
area. William F. Rodgers, chairman 
of the WAC Distributor Division, 
is requesting the chairmen of the 
various Exchange Managers Com- 
mittees to handle its release in their 
own exchanges as was done with 
"Prelude to War." 

It is expected that the 160 prints 
available for theatrical bookings will 
be shipped within a week and an- 
nouncement of exact release date 
then determined. 

By arrangement with Hal Home, 
of the WAC Public Relations Divi- 
sion, the 20th Century-Fox press 
book department is preparing a cam- 
paign book, which will be delivered 
to houses from National Screen Ser- 
vice exchanges. 

There will be a trailer, and pre- 
liminary discussions are being held to 
determine its length, also whether it 
will be in color or in black and white. 



FWC Planning Roadshows 
For Alcazar in Frisco 



San Francisco — Fox West Coast 
announced yesterday that negotia- 
tions for acquiring Sid Grauman's 
Alcazar theater here are being con- 
cluded by Charles P. Skouras, presi- 
dent of National Theaters, and Grau- 
man. 

The Alcazar, closed for several 
months, will be reopened about Sept. 
1 under the FWC management if 
Skouras and Grauman reach an 
agreement, B. V. Sturdivant, north- 
ern California FWC supervisor, said. 
The theater will be used exclusive- 
ly for roadshows, with reserved 
seats at advanced prices. 

Fox West Coast plans to spend 
between $25,000 and $50,000 remod- 
eling the Alcazar, Sturdivant said. 



G-B N. Y. Co. Dissolves 

Albany— Gaumont British Picture 
Corp. of America, New York City, 
has filed a certificate of voluntary 
dissolution in the office of the Sec- 
retary of State. 

Papers were filed through Adolph 
Schimel, attorney, 1250 Sixth Ave- 



COMIIIG and GOIflG 



CEORCE A. SMITH, Para.'s Western division 
manager, plans to leave Monday on a tour lil 
exchanges in his territory. 

ROBERT M. CILLHAM, arrived on the Coa; 
yesterday from the East. 

LEN DALY of the United Artists foreij 
publicity department, who has been in Mexic 
City the past two months, leaves Mexic 'oda 
for Havana. f 

MRS. VINCENT TROTTA is in ChiJIgp I 
visit her son, Vincent, Jr., a seaman secon 
class now training in aerial gunnery at tli 
Naval Pier there. Mrs. Trotta will visit Mii 
waukee before returning to New York. 

HARRY M. KALMINE, assistant general mana 
ger cf Warner Theaters, and HARRY GOLDBERC 
director of advertising and publicity, return \ 
New York today from Philadelphia. 

OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND, is expected in Ne> 
York the first week in August for a brie 
visit. 

MICHAEL TODD, the Broadway producer, 
back from Mexico City. 

JANE LAWRENCE of the cast of "Oklahoma 
will head for the Coast the beginning of Augus 

LEE SHUBERT has left town for a Mexica 
vacation with C. P. CRENEKER, his press rep 
resentative. 

JACK COETZ and ARTHUR GOTTLIEB, Iea\ 
next week for California and a tour of Unit! 
Artists exchanges in conjunction with a ne 
"World in Action" shorts series which UA wi 
distribute for Warwick Pictures. 

ARTHUR GREENBLATT, PRC sales chief, leave 
Hollywood Monday for Frisco, Seattle, Denvei 
Omaha, Chicago and New York. 

CHARLES SKOURAS and CHARLES A. BUCK 
LEY are due here Monday from the Coast. 

JACK HOEPFLER, Great States circuit cit 
manager in Quincy, III. has gone to his Summe 
home at Grand Marais, Minn. 

GEORGE FREEMAN, manager of the Loew 
Poli Springfield, Mass., has returned from hi 
vacation spent at Hampton Beach, New Hamp 
shire. 

DON WIDLUND of Jam Handy arrived yes 
terday from Orlando, Fla., and left last nigh 
for Detroit. 

HANK LINET left la